close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2110878

код для вставки
.12’. (i
. 29 i.
Wrilter ramp resume; @heain, lierhert F/Hugule»
ton Stanley, Tamworth, and <iohn illicit" lily
nrioclr, Sutton, England
No Drawing. lippiication @ctoher 4, i933, derial
No. 692,222. ‘in Great innit/sin Novernher it.
11932
2i! Claims. (ill. ?tii-mliddl
The present invention relates to the prepara
rnosphcres. A yield of 10.2 grams oi alcohol per
tion ‘of catalysts suitable for accelerating the iilil cos. of catalyst was obtained per hour. ‘Us
combination of oleflnes and water vapor to form inc so atmospheres total pressure, and a temper
the corresponding alcohols. Themechanical sta ature oi 2d0° ‘C2, the steam pressure being 10 at
di hliity oi’ the catalyst is of the utmost importance mospheres, the yield of ethyl alcohol was ill grains
when high partial pressures of steam are used at per hi0 cos. oi catalyst per hour. litter 72 hours
high temperatures.
or" running the catalyst had suiiered no deteri
Accordionr to the present invention catalysts
oration whatever.
m duced in a mechanically stable form, without
their activity being impaired. by incorporating
with the active catalytic material during prep¢
aration of the catalyst a drying oil, such as lin
seed oil, and by subsequently subjecting the min
W true to heat treatment. The amount of oil added
is preferably not more than 20 per cent by weight
oi‘ the catalytic materials employed in the prep
aration of the catalyst.
'
'
The alcove-described method of preparation is
go particularly applicable to catalysts containing an
excess of phosphoric acid over and above the
amount required to'forrn the orthophosphate oi’
the element or elements employed. When at
tempt is made to use catalytic material contain
‘ 25 inc relatively large amounts oi’ phosphoric acid
under conditions of high partial steam pressure
such as is required at total working pressures
between 20 and 100 ‘atmospheres without first
preparing the material as above described, it tends
30 to break down mechanically. The mechanical
‘stability of such material could be improved by
decreasing the amount of phosphoric acid pres
ent in it, but we have found that this reduces ma
terially the activity of the material and dimin
35 ishes-the amount of alcohol which can be pro
duced per unit volume of such materialin unit
time.
.
'
'
. The following examples illustrate the manner
in which the invention may be carried into effect
40 and results obtained by their uses:-
Example I
A mixture of one gm. mol. of manganese car
bonate, half :1 gm. mol. of boric anhydrlde and
'
Example ii’
suitable for the hydration of olei‘lnes are pro
8.9 grams of alcohol per W0 cc. of catalyst were ‘
obtained per hour. Using a total pressure of i0
atmospheres and 290° C. the yield oi alcohol was
111% grams per 100 cos. of catalyst per hour.
After 'lll'hours continuous running the catalysts
hadisufiered no deterioration whatever.
Although applicable for the preparation of cat
alystscontaining an excess oi‘ phosphoric acid
this method of preparation can equally be applied
to other catalytic materials containing an excess
of acidic radical, for example tunestic acid and
the liire._
pared ln the mannerdescribed there is formed a.
carbonaceous residue which seems to give me
chanical stability or structural strength to the
catalyst sothat it maintains substantially all of
its physical and chemical characteristics during
long periods of use in the catalytic conversion of
ole?nes and water vapor into the correspondincr
alcohols.
I
What we claim is:—
40
’
,
1. The process of catalytically converting ole
iines into alcohols which comprises passing a
mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor at ele
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst
with water and during the evaporation 18.5 gms'.
comprising essentially a solid hydration cata
lytic material and the intimately dispersed car
bonaceous residue of~ a drying oil resulting from
mixing said material and the drying oil and heat
resulting mass is then baked at 200° C. and after
50 grinding. a further 3% of raw linseed oil is added
30
It is one of the advantages of the invention
that by baking the composite catalyst body pre
45 3.6 gm. mols of orthophosphoric acid are digested
of raw linseed oil are added and at the point of
solidi?cation the mass is violently stirred. The
Ml
in place of the 13.5 grams of linseed oil men
tioned in Example I tune oil to the extent of 18.5
grams was used in the ?rst stage. After looking
at 250° C. the mass was ground with 3% of lin
seed oil and was tabletted, and the tablets were
haired at 200° C‘. When ethylene and steam were
passed over this catalyst under the store-men
tioned conditions at 2T0” C. and dill atmospheres.
ing the mixture.
' '
and the mass tabletted and the tablets baked at
200° C. for one to two hours. Over the catalyst
so prepared and at a temperature of 270° c, ethyL.
?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a ‘
one and steam were passed at a total vpressure of
vated temperatures and pressures over a cata
20 atmospheres, the steam pressure being 6 at
2. The process of catalytically converting ole
mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor. at ele
lyst comprising essentially a solid hydration cat
2,110,878
11. The process of catalytically converting ole
alyticmaterial and the intimately dispersed car
bonaceous residue of linseed oil resulting from
mixing said material and the oil and heating the
mixture..
?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a mix
ture of the olefine and water vapor at elevated
temperatures and pressures over a catalyst pre
.
3. The process of catalytically converting ole
?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a
pared by making an inorganic hydration catalytic
phosphate containing phosphoric acid in excess
mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor at ele
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst
incorporating adrying oil in the composition and
comprising essentially a solid hydration catalytic
baking same.
10 material and the intimately dispersed carbona
ceous residue of tung oil resulting from mixing
said material and the oil and heating the mix
5
of that necessary to form the orthophosphate.
12. The process oi’ catalytically converting ole
ilnes into alcohols which comprises passing a
mixture oi’ the ole?ne and water vapor at elevated
temperatures and pressures over a catalyst pre
ture.
4. The process of catalytically converting ole
15 ?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a
mixture of the ole?ne and. water vapor at-ele
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst
comprising essentially a solid hydration catalytic
material and the intimately dispersed carbona
ceous residue of linseed oil and tung oil resulting
irom mixing said material and the oils and heat
ing the mixture.
- 5. The process of catalytically converting ole
~ ?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a
pared bymaking an inorganic hydration catalytic
phosphate containing phosphoric acid in excess of
that necessary to form the. orthophosphate, in
corporating linseed oil in the composition and
baking same.
'
13. The process of catalytically converting'ole
?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a 20
mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor at ele
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst
prepared by making an inorganic hydration cat
alytic phosphate containing phosphoric acid inv
25 mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor at ele
excess or that necessary to form the orthophos~ 25
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst ' phate, ‘incorporating linseed oil in the composition
comprising essentially a solid hydration catalytic . and tabletting and baking same.
material and the intimately dispersed carbona
ceous residue oi’ a ‘drying oil resulting from mix
ing said material with up to 20 per cent by weight
‘oi’ said 011 and heating the mixture.
14. The process of catalytically'converting ole
,?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a
mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor at ele an
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst
6. The process of catalytically converting ole
?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a
mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor at ele
prepared by making an inorganic hydration cata
lytic phosphate containing phosphoric acid in
35 vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst
phate, incorporating linseed oil in the composi
tion, then baking and grinding same, and ?nally
tabletting with additional linseed oil and rebak
comprising essentially a solid inorganic hydration
catalytic phosphate and the intimately dispersed
carbonaceous residue of a drying oil resulting
from mixing said phosphate and the ‘drying oil
40
and heating. the mixture.
_ _
'
excess of that necessary to form' the orthophos
in8.
-
15. The process of catalyticallyconverting' ole
?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a mix
40
ture of the ole?ne and water vapor at elevated
7. The process oi’ catalytically converting ole
?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a temperatures and pressures over a catalyst pre
pared by making an inorganic hydration catalytic
mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor at ele
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst phosphate containing phosphoric acid in excess of
that necessary to form .the orthophosphate, in 45
._ comprising essentially a solid inorganic hydra
corporating tung oil in the composition, then
tion catalytic phosphate and the intimately dis
baking ‘and grinding same. and ?nally tabletting
persed carbonaceous residue oi‘ linseed oil result
ing from mixing said phosphate and linseed oil
and heating the mixture.
50
'
with additional tung oil and rebaking.
_
‘ 16. A hydration catalyst for the hydration of
8. The process oi! catalytically converting jole
?nes into alcohols which comprises passing a mix
ture of the ole?ne and water vapor at elevated
ole?nes comprising essentially a‘ solid hydration
catalytic material and having dispersed therein by
temperatures and pressures over a catalyst com- ,
drying oil whereby the physical structureof the
catalyst may be maintained substantially con
stant- under elevated temperatures and pres
prising essentially a solid inorganic hydration
catalytic phosphate and the intimately dispersed‘
carbonaceous residue of tung oil resulting from’
' mixing said phosphate and tung oil and heating
the mixture.
9. The process of catalytically converting ole-v
00 ?nes into- alcohols which comprises passing a
mixture oi’ the ole?ne and water vapor at ele
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst
comprising essentially a solid inorganic hydra
tion catalytic phosphate and excess phosphoric
acid and the intimately dispersed carbonaceous
residue of a drying oil resulting from mixing the
aforesaid materials and heating the mixture.
10. The process oi catalytically converting ole-‘
fines into alcohols which comprises passing a
70 mixture of the ole?ne and water vapor at ele
vated temperatures and pressures over a catalyst
comprising essentially pellets of intimately ad
mixed inorganic hydration catalytic phosphate,
excess phosphoric acid, and the carbonaceous resi
76 due oi a drying oil charred in situ.
production in situ the carbonaceous residue of a
sures.
-
'
17. A hydration catalyst for the hydration of
ole?nes ~comprising essentially a solid hydration
catalytic material and having dispersed therein
by production in situ a carbonaceous residue of
60
a substance taken from a group consisting of
linseed oil and tung oil whereby the physical
character of the catalyst may be maintained
substantially constant under elevated tempera
tures and pressures.
-
g
18. A hydration catalyst for the hydration of
ole?nes comprising essentially a solid hydration
catalytic material and having dispersed therein
the carbonaceous residue of linseed oil by pro
duction in situ whereby the physical structure of 70
the catalyst may be maintained substantially -
constant under elevated temperatures and pres
sures.
.
19. A hydration catalyst for “the hydration of
ole?nescomprising essentially a solid hydration 75
2,110,878
catalytic material and having dispersed therein
the carbonaceous residue of tung oil by produc
tion in situ whereby the physical structure of the
catalyst may be maintained substantially eon
the carbonaceous residue of linseed oil and tung
oil'by production in situ whereby the physical
structure of the catalyst may be maintained sub
stantially constant under elevated temperatures
stant under elevated temperatures and pressures.
20. A hydration catalyst for the hydration of
and pressures.
ole?nes comprising essentially a solid hydration
eatalytio material and having dispersed therein
'
WALTER. PHILIP JOSHUA.
HERBERT MUGGLETON STANLEY.
JOHN BLAIR DYMOCK.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
399 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа