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Патент USA US2127099

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Aug. 16, 1938.
A. K. WHITAKER
2,127,099
RIDGE TYPE VENTILATOR'
Filed July 1, 1936 '
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
HW1M%HIalH-].W
,A/vTv/v K. WHITAKERE
Aug- 16, 1938.
A. K. WHITAKER
2,127,099
RIDGE TYPE VENTILATOR
Filed July 1, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
ANToN A’. WHITAKER
My?
2,121,099.
‘ Patented Aug. 16, 1938
UNITED STATES - PATENT
OFFICE‘
2.121.099
amen ma vau'rma'roa
Anton K. Whitaker, Cnyahoga Fails. Ohimauign
or to The Burt Manuiacturing 09mm.
' Akron; Ohio, a corporation of Ohio
I
Application July 1, 1936, Serial No. 88,395
towns.
The present invention relates to long or ridge
type ventilators for buildings. A ventilator oi
the ridge type has a number of advantages over
individual or unit ventilators as it gives uninter
5 rupted ventilation over the root or rootv section.
whereas the unit type of ventilator concentrates
ventilation at isolated spots and leaves interme
diate areas unventilated.
Thev ridge type ven
tilator is also more sightly than the unit type.
10' Ridge type ventilators have been known and
used prior to the present invention, but earlier
forms have had certain disadvantages and limi
tations which the present invention overcomes.
One of the advantages of the ventilator shown
15 and described herein is that outside currents of
air striking the ventilator are directed within
the interior thereof and are conducted through
the ventilator so that a suction or siphoning
effect is secured, increasing the e?‘iciency of the‘
20 ventilator. A further object of the invention is
to provide for a vertically moving damper which
increases the e?lcient length of the ventilator.
Prior ventilators of this type have been equipped
with dampers which move longitudinally as they
25 are raised and lowered, thereby reducing the
area of the opening in the building. The mecha
nism for raising and lowering the damper is also
improved over previous designs.
Further objects of the ventilator are to im
3 O prove upon the means for joining ventilator sec
tions so that a long ventilator may be built up
from individual sections. In the event that
longer installations are required that would pre
vent the operation of the damper by a single
35 device, the ventilator has been designed so that
it may be divided into operative sections without
breaking the symmetry of the installation.
'
Other objects and advantages are secured from
the invention as will be apparent from the de-'
40 scription and drawings, and it will be seen that
, changes and modi?cations may be made without
altering the principles of the ventilator or chang
ing its functions and purposes.
45
In the drawings in which the best known or
preferred form of the invention is shown:
'
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a unit of the ridge
ventilator, one end being broken out to show the
end closure and the other end being broken out
on the line l—-l of Fig. 2;
'
Fig. 2 is an end' view looking into the unit fro
the right of Fig. 1;
.
-
Fig. 3 is a section at the closed end of the ven
tilator on the line 3-4 of Fig. 1;
55
Fig. 4 is a view showing the’ means oi’ joining
(c1. 9H2)
,
or splicing two units, the section being taken on
the line 4-4 01' Fig. 5;
' '
FlFlgl. 5 is a horizontal section on the line 5-4 of
Fig. 6 is a section on the line 6-6 of Fig. '7, 5
showing the partition which is used in splicing
two sections of the ventilator with individual
dampers; and
. »
Fig. 7 is a vertical section on the line 'I—1'oi
Fig. 6.
l0
The ventilator is adapted to any form or shape
of root, the support and attachment of the ven- '
tilator being changed to ?t any type of root
encountered.
I
In the form shown the ventilator, which is 15
formed in lengths or units, is mounted upon two
oppositely positioned strips shown at 2-2 which
are shaped to ?t any roof construction to which
the ventilator is adapted. These strips are lo
cated on opposite sides of the ventilation opening 20
3 leading from‘ the interior of the building. At
the end of the ventilator the metal may form the
peak of the roof as shown at l. The inner edges
of the strips 2 are bent upwardly to form the
vertical ?anges 5 upon which the ventilator is 25
supported. These ?anges may be braced at con
venient intervals by horizontal braces ‘I and
arched braces l.
-
Along the sides of the ventilator are arrang/ "l
the two parallel and oppositely positioned wind 30
or storm bands III which are formed off-sheet
metal with the central vertical. webs and in
wardly inclined upper and lower edge portions
12 and M, respectively. The windband is sup
ported from the vertical ?anges 5 by the rectan- 35 '
gular straps l6 and inclined braces l'l which are
secured by the bolts I8 whichalso form the at
tachments for the horizontal braces ‘I. It will
be noted that the lower edge of the ?ange i4 is
spaced from the roof an appreciable distance 40
over the entire length of the ventilator to pro
vide a longitudinal wind opening IS on either
side of the ventilator. In this respect the pres
,ent type of ridge ventilator diii'ers from and pre
sents marked advantages over previous ventila- 45
tors of this type as the construction is such that
currents of air from outside the building will
enter and be conducted through the ventilator
so as to create a suction or aspirating e?ect and
thus increase its e?ectiveness. The lower edge 50
may be maintained at the proper distance from
the ?anges 5 to permit the free entrance of ex
ternal air currents by spacer sleeves i 8 which
are received over bolts l9 passing through the
lower .edge of the windbands and the vertical 55
?anges. The windband is sti?ened along the‘
ing link 52 to the lower end of which the chain
lower edge by a reversely turned ?ange 23 and
along the upper edge by a similar ?ange 2|.
42 is attached. At one end of the damper, links
54- and 55 are connected to the rail 5| and the
link 52, respectively, and are pivoted at 56 to
the inside faces of the ?anges 5. .A supple
The upper edges of the windbands are spaced
apart along the top 01' the ventilator at some dis
tance above the opening 3 to form the longitudi
nal discharge opening 24 and are braced by'the
horizontal straps 25 and by inverted. arched
straps 2i, which‘latter form a convenient upper
10
limit or‘stop for the damper. _The straps 25
form a convenient rest for a screen 23, if such is
15
mental or idle link 53 is provided at the other
end of the damper. It will be seen that as the
chain ,42 is pulled, the rails II are elevated
and the damperraised, the‘rolling' contact with
the underside of the damper permitting it to
move in a vertical direction. The operation
to be employed, screws 23 passing through the
upper edge of the windband and into the edges
is easy and a long damper member. may be
of the screen.
tendency for the damper-operating mechanism
I
4
The metal forming the vertical sides 5 of the
ventilator is bent backwardly to form de?ector
strips which are indicated by the numeral 30.
These de?ector strips, in the form shown, are
V-shaped and on their lower sides substan
20 tially parallel the lower edge portions of the
windbandabeing spaced therefrom to form the
channels or passages 32 communicating with
the passages ‘I! which conduct and direct the
outside currents of air through the ventilator.
25 In former ridge ventilators, it has been the in
' tention and‘ object to prevent air ‘currents from
the exterior entering the ventilator. This is
contrary to the principle and mode of operation of the present ventilator which admits the
30 external currents of air in very substantial.
moved. with little exertion, nor is there any
to bind at‘ any point.
-
Rain, snow or debris entering the ventilatory
15
is intercepted directly by the damper and di
rected toward the sides of the ventilator, pass-~
ing out. onto the roof through the openings
II. By this improved construction it isnot 20
necessary to provide a central ridge member in
the top of the ventilator to make the device
weatherproof,_ as in prior forms of ventilators
of this type, and consequently freer passage
of air is allowed through the ventilator.
25,
To make the ventilator weatherproof at the
end, a closure piece'tll is provided which ?ts
around the windbands and is provided with
a horizontal ?ange 62 which extends over the
opening 3 and is provided with downwardly 30
quantities but guides and directs them after ?aring skirts 64 which direct water into the
they enter the ventilator so as to increase the. opening l5. An upstanding ?ange 65 is pro
e?iciency of, the. ventilator. For this purpose vided at the side of the piece ill to prevent
it will be observed that currents of air enter
the over?ow of water into the opening 3.
The ventilator which has been shown and de 36
35 ing the openings l5 are directed by the de?ectors
30 along the passages 32, from whence-‘they scribed ismade in unit lengths which may be
move upwardly along the inner walls of the wind
joined together. The several units are spliced
bands and pass out ‘through the opening 24 end to end as-shown in Figs. 4 and 5. For this
in the general direction of the arrows marked A. purpose the de?ectors 30 on one unitare stepped
The upward movement of these currents will back from the end of the unit to permit telescop
~10
create a suction or aspirating effect upon the ing of the units. This is shown at 66 in Fig. 5.
air moving upward through the opening 3, such
The side strips 2 and the windbands are over
currents being noted by the arrows B. As these
currents A and B meet around the lower edges
of the damper, the suction effect of the .strong
currents A will draw the air from the interior
lapped and connected, the reversely bent rein
forcing ?anges being stepped back. A cover
plate 61 is secured to and overlaps both damp
of the building upward through the opening
units is not too long to permit the operation of
the damper by a single mechanism, provision is
made for joining the damper-operating mech
anisms. In the form illustrated in Fig. 1, the 50
section will be added to the left of Fig. 1, the
3 and out of the ventilator.
The ba?ies or de
?ectors 30 also direct the incoming air currents
50 away from the opening 3 and there is no down
draft.
The damper is indicated by the numeral 40
and is movable between its lower position, shown
in dotted lines in.Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 6, where, it
rests upon the upper edges of the vertical ?anges
5 and closes the opening 3, and its extreme
upper position against the braces 26 (shown
in full lines).
It is moved to a greater or less
extent by a chain or cord shown at 42. ‘This
60 damper is superior to other dampers used in
.this type of ventilator because it moves ‘in a
vertical direction and does not shift longitu
dinally, being guided in its movement by rollers
44 attached to the sides of the damper andv
moving in vertical trackways 45 attached to
the underside of the edge portions I2 of the
windbands and to the upper side of the de?ectors 30.
The damper is of su?lcient width to cover the
opening 3 and is formed with a central ?attened
trough or channel 40 by which the damper is
supported upon rollers 50 arranged at convenient
intervals in parallel rails 5| extending for a dis
tance along the underside of the damper. The
75 rails 5| are connected at one end to an actuat
ers. In the event that an ‘assembly of these
end piece .60 being removed and the splice made
at that point.
The added section will be pro
vided with additional links 58, bar 5| and roll- '
ers. A tying link“, broken o? and shown in 55
dotted lines in Fig. 1, connects the bar 5| with
the corresponding bar on the next adjacent sec
tion.
'
In the event the installation is too long to
permit of the operation of the damper by a 60
single operating device, or should separate damp
er controls be desired, it is necessary to pro-1
vide a weatherproof joint at the division line
between two sections. Such a device is shown
in Figs. 6 and 7 and ‘consists of a vertical wall 65
.10, preferably formed of a two-ply metal, the '
lower edges of which are bent outwardly to pro
vide cover plates 'Il over the opening 3, extend
ing for a su?icient distance to intercept rain be
tween the ends of the dampers. Upright walls 70
12 prevent water from running off‘ the plates
into the opening and skirts ‘I3 extend down
wardly and overlap the side walls and de?ector
strips.
.
The ventilator secures the maximum e?ficiency
3
/ ‘2,127,090
from‘ the wind, but is storm and weatherproof
throughout. The baille or de?ector strip 80, in
path, and means to intercept rain and to prevent
its admission into the ventilation opening at thev
combination with the spaced windband, gives'a
ends of the damper.
The mechanism for raising and lowering-the
damper is simple and easy to operate. .In fact,
of the‘ walls, and spaced therefrom, the storm
,
'
4. A continuous ventilator of the ridge type
new and highly e?lcient mode of operation. Rain
adapted to be placed over‘ an elongated ridge
or snow entering the ventilator is de?ected be
neath the lower edge of the windband at the opening, comprising two spaced parallel strips
sides and ends and also at any division points attached to the building at either side'of a ridge
between dampers. The vertical movement of the opening, vertical walls rising from the inner
damper reduces to a‘ minimum the amount of \edges of said strips, vertical ‘parallel strips con
10 closure required at the end zone of the ventilator. stituting storm bands located on opposite sides 10
the mechanism operates so easily that as many
as four ten-foot lengths may be operated by a
15 single chain. The weight of the damper is always
su?icient to close it when the chain is released.
For v?reproofness'a fusible link may be inserted
in the chain.
What is claimed is:
,20
1. In a ventilator of the ridge type adapted to
be mountedover a building ventilation opening,
a casing composed of two parallel windbands
bands being provided with upper and lower in
wardly directed inclined edges, inclined deflector
members carried on'the vertical walls and form
ing air directing channels with the lower edges
of the storm bands, vertical end walls at the ends
of the ventilator, and a movable damper located
over the ventilation opening and below the top
of the storm bands.
5. In a continuous ventilator of the ridge type
adapted to be placed over an elongated ventilation
opening, comprising two spaced parallel strips
spaced at their. upper edges to provide a free dis- ‘ attached to the building at either side of the ridge
charge opening, walls within the casing on op
25 posite sides of the building ventilation opening,
a damper located in the casing and movable to
ward and from the ventilation opening in a ver
tical line, said damper being extended laterally
to intercept rain entering the discharge opening
30 and to direct it to the sides of the casing, the
lower edges of the casing being spaced from the
roof to permit free access of wind below the
ventilation opening, de?ectors below the ventila
tion opening to direct the wind against the inner
35 walls of the casing and upwardly past the ven
tilation opening to the discharge opening, and
means at the end of the casing to cover the
ventilation opening su?iciently to prevent the
entrance of rain at that point.
2. A continuous ventilator vof the ridge type
40 adapted to be placed over an elongated ridge
opening, comprising two spaced parallel strips
attached to the building at either side of a ridge
opening, vertical walls rising from the inner edges
of said strips, vertical parallel strips constituting
45 storm bands located on opposite sides of the
walls and spaced therefrom, the storm bands
being provided with upper and lower inwardly
directed inclined edges, inclined de?ector mem
bers carried on the vertical walls and forming
50 air directing channels with the lower edges of
the storm bands, vertical end walls at the ends
of the ventilator, a movable damper located over
55
the ventilation opening and below the top of the
storm bands, the ends of the damper being closely
adjacent the end walls, and means to move the
damper in a direct vertical path.
I 3. A continuous ventilator of the ridge type
adapted to be placed over an elongated ridge
60
opening, comprising two spaced parallel strips
opening, vertical parallel storm bands extending
the length of the ventilator and spaced on op 25
posite sides of the strips, end walls on the ventila
tor, a movable damper over the ventilation open
ing located between the storm bands and extend
ing from end wall to end wall, and means to move
the damper in a direct vertical path.
,
6. In a continuous ventilator adapted to be
placed over an elongated opening, comprising
spaced parallel strips on either side of the open
ing, vertical walls rising from the strips and de
?ning an elongated ventilation opening, vertical
parallel storm bands extending the length of the
ventilator on either side of the walls and spaced
therefrom, inturned edge portions on the storm
bands de?ning the outlet of the ventilator, and
an elongated movable plate located in the space
de?ned by the storm bands, the inturned edge
portions and the upper edges of the vertical walls,
said platebeing'adapted to operate as a damper
and being of su?lcient width to intercept rain
entering the outlet opening and prevent it from
entering the ventilation opening in any position
of the damper.
7. In a continuous ventilator adapted to be
placed over an elongated opening, comprising
spaced parallel strips on either side of the open
ing, vertical walls rising from the inner edges 50
of said strips and de?ning an elongated ventila
tion opening, vertical parallel storm bands ex
tending the length of the ventilator on either
side 01' the walls and spaced therefrom, inturned 55
edge portions on the storm bands de?ning the
outlet of the ventilator, a vertically movable elon
gated plate located between the outlet opening
and the ventilation opening and constituting a»
damper, end walls on the ventilator, the ends of
the damper lying adjacent the end walls, and
means to move the damper in avdirect vertical
line.
edges of said strips, vertical parallel strips con
8. A ventilator of the continuous ridge type
stituting storm bands located on opposite sides
adapted to be placed over an elongated building 65
of
the
walls
and
spaced
therefrom,
the
storm
65
opening, comprising two parallel strips on op
bands being provided with upper and lower in
posite sides of the opening, vertical walls rising
wardly directed inclined edges, inclined de?ec
tor members carried on the vertical walls ‘and from the strips and de?ning the ventilation open
‘forming air directing channels with the lower ‘ing, vertically arranged storm bands on opposite
edges of the storm bands, ‘vertical end walls at sides of the ventilation opening but spaced to 70
70
the ends of the ventilator, a movable damper provide passages extending along- the building
located over the ventilation opening and below between the lower edges of the storm bands and‘
the top of the storm bands, the ends of the the roof, a movable damper over the ventilation
damper being closely adjacent the end walls, opening below the upper edges of the storm bands
means to move the damper in a direct vertical and spanning the space between said vertical 75
v75
attached to the building at either side of a ridge
. opening, vertical walls rising from the inner
4
‘
-
2,197,090
walls and adapted to seat thereon in lowered
position and inclinedde?ectors on the-sides oi
the walls located within the passages and adapted
to direct air 'currents which enter the ventilator
irom below along the inner surfaces of the storm
bands.‘
.
9. A ventilator oi‘the continuous ridge type
adapted to be placed over an elongated building
opening, comprising two parallel. stripson op
10 posite sides of the opening, vertical walls rising
- from the strips and de?ning the ventilation open
ing, vertically arrangedstorm bands on opposite
sides of the ventilation opening but spacedto
provide passages extending along the building
between the, lower edges of the storm bands and
the roof, inclined de?ectors on the sides of the
walls located within the‘ passages and adapted
to direct air currents which. .enter the ventilator
from below along the inner surfaces of the storm
bands and past the ventilation opening to create
an aspiratlng' e?ect at the ventilation- opening,
and a movable plate between the storm bands 10
constituting a damper.
.
. _
-.
ANTON K. WHITAKER.v ,
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