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Патент USA US2150773

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,
March 14, 1939.
„L LAWSON ET AL
2,150,773v
KNITTED FABRIC AND PROCESS FOR KNITTING THE SAME
Filed Jan. 25, 1953
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KNITTED FABRIC AND PROCESS FOR KNITTING THE SAME
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INVENTOR s.
.To HN LAWS o N
RoßE/PT E LAWSoN
March 14, 1939-
J. I_AwsoN ET AL
2,150,773
KNI'II'TED FABRIC AND PROCESS FOR KNITTING THE SAME
Filed Jan. 25, 1933
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March 14, 1939.
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Jj LAWSON ET AL
2,150,773
KNITTED FABRIC' AND PROCESS FOR KNITTING THE SAME
Filed Jan. 25, 1933
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A2,150,773
`Patented Mar. 14, 1939
„ UNITED STATES
PATENT ol-‘Fl‘ca
2,150,173
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KNTTTED FABRIC AND PROCESS Foa
_
xm'r'rrNG 'ma SAME
John_lawson, Bristol, and Robert H. Lawson,
Pawtucket, R. I., assignors to _Hemphill Com
pany, Central Falls, R. I., a corporation of
Massachusetts
Application January za, 1933,4 serial No. 653,150
9 Claims.
’I'his invention relates to knitted fabrics and
processes for knitting the same, being more par
ticularly directed to hosiery of the so-cailed seam
less and other types wherein are knitted stripes
(0l. 66-180)
When knitting the so-called lap stripe with an
additional wrapping of yarn or thread the main
or body- yarn is also knittedby the needles that
knit the wrapping yarn. If two yarns or threads
only are fed to the needles, the lap stripe shows
or other figures or designs, extending generally
lengthwise of the stockingand characterized by ' clearly; but if it is desired to combine 'the lap
the knitting-in of -a supplemental yarn or yarns stripe with reverse plating then it'becomes dimf.
in addition to- the main or body yarn and more -cult to knit vthe main, the plain plating and the
.specifically to the knitting ~of stripes or ñgures
by means of a wrapping of yarn or thread fed
to certain selected needles in each course of knit
ting, in the manner disclosed in the patent to
Lawson and Lawson‘1,702,608, February 19, 1929,
of winch the present application is a continua
-tion as to all common subject matter. This ap
plication is also a continuation, as to all common
subject matter, of application Ser. No. 333,318,
filed January 18, 1929.
For purposes of illustration, Flgs.'2-6 of the
drawings, which show the inner or rear faces of
the several fabrics, show body yarns as well as
plating yarns in the plain plated wales, and all
three yarns-including the Wrap stripe 4yarn---in
some of the wrap stripe wales; although actually
' the body yarns alone show, or show more promi
-nently, at the inner faces of the fabrics.. Of
course, where reverse plating occurs the body
wrapping yarns, when knitting wide stripes, with
out the plain plating yarn breaking the continuity
of the lap stripe.
'
-
The various forms of the fabrics disclosed in the
drawings and speciñcation all have two yarns,
namely, a main or body yarn and a plain plating
yarn, both yarns being knit-in throughout the
wales not within the lap stripe areas, designs being
knitted by reversing the body and lplain plating
yarns, as indicated at D, Fig.` 1, in' the wales not
supplied with the .lap'stripe plating yarn; or the
body yarn may be knit-in throughout andthe
plating yarn substantially throughout but ñoated
back of the body yarn wheredesigns or other
figured effects are desired as at E, Flg.‘1, the body
yarn showing upon the face of the fabric at the
25
’
wales where the plain plating yarn ñoats.
During the knitting of the lap stripe, the plain
plating yarn is floatedl back of all the lap stripe
yarn shows at the face wales, and the plain plat- . wales or some of .them only, . whereby, at. said
wales, not more than two yarns will be knit-in,
ing yarn on the inner or rear face of the fabric.
the plain plating andin some cases also the main 30
In» the accompanying'drawings:
»
~
‘
yarn or thread floating back of such wales -to
Fig. 1 shows a side view of a half hose or stock
ing having stripes knitted therein, which stripes vgether with the rear stretches of the lap stripe .
'extend lengthwise of the leg and foot portions,
the half-hose or stocking also being shown as
having stepped or broken designs;
»
y ~ Figs. 2, 3, 4,15 and 6 disclose inner or rear face
views of fabrics, showing variations in the struc
tures of the stitches particularly where the stripes
are knitted, all forms showing the ñoating of cer
plating yarn.V vThe body yarn even where knit-in
with the lap stripe yarn does Inot show through
on the front face of the fabric, the lap stripe or 35
reinforcing yarn effectively plating thereover,
and overcoming the objection of imperfect plat- ’
ing vmore or less apparent >when knitting wide
stripes with the lap stripe plating, Plain plating,
40
tain-of the knitting yarns or threads back of the. and body yarns all knit-in at the same wales.
Fig. 1 of the drawings shows a striped stocking
wrapping of yarn or thread forming the stripe or
- other ñgured design;
,
Flg.'7 is a -view of a few wales »and courses of a
or halféhose indicated generally by the reference
character A, said half-hose having knitted there
‘
' - in vertical stripes B some of which-span more
p Fig. 8 is a view of a few wales and courses of a wales than the others. At C are shown stepped,
r fabric similar to Fig. 7 but showing a single wrap ' lap stripe designs made possible by selective con
lfabric showing stepped designs;
y
t
l stripe Wale following which are shown spaced,
wrap stripe wales; and
'
Fig. 9 is a view somewhat similar to Fig. 8 but
showing the wrap stripe wales as having' wrap
threads knitted therein;
'
Fig. l0 shows to a greatly enlarged scale a fab
ric knitted as in Fig. 4, but wherein the wrap or
trol of the needles.- The half-hose shows the
stripes extendingthroughout the leg and' foot
portions thereof though, if desired, the ‘stripes
may be omitted fromcertain portions as in the
sole. During heel and toe knitting .the striping
yarns are idle and consequently do not show.
In Fig. 2 is shown the preferred form of several-
namentalportion is somewhat of the shape i'ndl- « different fabric structures that overcome the ob
cated at Fig. 1 but being a solid pattern.
jection of imperfect plating, the numeral I indi- f
2
2,150,773
eating the last plain plated Wale; 2A the first lap
or wrap stripe Wale; 3, 4, 5 the intermediate lap
stripe wales; 6 the last lap stripe Wale; ‘I the fol
lowing plain plated Wale. In this form the plain
In the form of fabric shown in Fig. 6, plain
plated Wales 4I, 42 are followed by intermediate,
lap stripe wales 43, 44, 45, such lap stripe wales
being, in turn, followed by plain plated Wales 46,
plating yarn 8 floats across all of the wales of the
41. The plain plated wales are knitted With the
lap stripe areas, which though shown in Fig. 2
plain plating yarn 48 and the body yarn 49; where
and Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6 as consisting of the same
as the lap stripe wales are knitted with the lap
stripe yarn 5I) only, the plain plating and body
number of Wales, from course to course, may, as `
disclosed in Fig. l at C, Vary from course to course.
10 The body yarn 9, Fig. 2, on the other hand, is knit
in throughout the lap stripe areas as Well as in
yarns 48, 49, floating across the intermediate
Wales. The interlocking of the lap stripe floats 10
with the floats of the plain plating and body
the plain plated portion of the stocking or fabric. _yarns is availed of to connect the intermediate
The lap stripe plating yarn I0 is fed to the selected wales with the plain plated wales. .
1t win be understood than in au the forms '
needles by wrapping the said yarn therearound,
disclosed, the main or body yarn, the plain plat 15
15 the rear or non-knitted portions of the wrapping
yarn appearing as floats back of the knitted , ing yarn, and the lap stripe, plating yarn may
wales. Each lap stripe float passes to the rear havedifferent characteristics as to Weight, color
of the plain plating yarn float, then around again
forward of the said float Where it is caught by the
20 ñrst needle in the following course and knit-in t0
gether with the main yarn, the lap stripe and plain
plating yarn floats thus interlocking. The striped
fabric shown in said Fig. 2 is uniform throughout
to the extent that there are two knit-in yarns in
_
25 all of the wales._l
In the form shown in Fig. 3, the first Wale, which
is plain plated, is indicated by the numeral II:
the first lap stripe Wale is indicated by I2, and has
three knit-in yarns; I3, I 4, I5 are the intermediate
30 lap stripe wales whereat two yarns only are knit
in, the plain plating yarn floating; I6 designates
the last lap stripe Wale and has three knit-in
yarns; ‘ I1 designates the next following plain
plated Wale beyond the lap stripe area. 'I‘he plain
plating yarn I8 is thereby effectively hidden by
floating back of the intermediate wales of the lap
stripe, being knitted together with the main yarn
I 9 and lap stripe yarn 20 at the ilrst and last
lap stripe wales only of a given course.
In the form shown in Fig. 4, 2| is the last plain
plated Wale; 22 is the first lap stripe Wale, at
which Wale all three yarns are shown as being
knitted; 23, 24, 25 are the intermediate wales hav
ing one knitted yarn only,” namely, the lap stripe
45 yarn, there being three floats including the rear
stretch of the lap stripe yarn; 26 is the last lap
stripe Wale, all three yarns being knitted-in in said
Wale; 2'|_ is the following plain plated Wale and is
and quality, cotton, silk and artificial silk ordinar
ily being used.
'
The fabric shown in Fig. '7 corresponds to that
shown in Fig. 2 excepting that the designs knitted
into the fabric are stepped, in other Words, the
Wrap stripe thread 5I is knitted into the fabric at
one or tWo- wales (two such wales 52 and 53 being
shown) and thereafter is knitted into adjacent 25
Wales 54 and 55 only, floating across wales 52 and
53,-'following which the said wrap stripe thread 5I
is knitted into wales 56 and 51 only, floating
across wales 52-55 inclusive.
The fabric design disclosed in Fig. '7 has, for 30
illustrative purposes only, been shown and de
scribed as corresponding to the form of fabric dis
closed in Fig.I 2; however, the broken or stepped
designs may obviously be knitted into the fabric
and either or both body yarns may be floated 35
across somewales and knitted into others as dis
closed in Figs. 3-6.
-
Although a striping yarn has been referred to
throughout this specification, it is not the inten
tion to restrict this invention to the use of a single 40
striping yarn as, ordinarily, and as disclosed in
the Lawson and Lawson Patent 1,702,608, several
such striping or lap stripe, plating yarns are used,
certain needles‘lmitting one of the said striping
yarns and other needles-knitting another such 45
yarn.
-
In all the forms disclosed, the plain plating and
lap stripe plating yarns are knitted, preferably
composed of two yarns only. The fabric disclosed ' though not necessarily, under tension, 'as light a
tension as possible being maintained on the lap 50
50 in Fig. 4 differs fro-m that shown in Fig. 3 in that
the intermediate Wales 23, 24, 25 are composed of a
single knitted yarn, the plain plating yarn 28 as
well as the main or body yarn 29 floating back of
and across the intermediate wales 23, 24, 25 of the
55 lap stripe, the lap stripe yarn 30 only, being
knitted-in at the said wales.
Fig. 5 discloses still another form more like the
form shown in Fig. 2 than those of Figs. 3 and 4
in some respects; both Figs. 2 and 5 showing fab
60 rics wherein there are not more than two yarns
knitted at any Wale. In the form disclosed in Fig.
stripe or reinforcing yarn; the body yarn, on the
other hand, being free from tension or ~substan
tially so.
In the several modifications disclosed herein,
float threads are the result of the knitting of 55
the striped fabric, the lap stripe itself leaving
floats and, the main or body yarn and the plain
plating yarn appearing as floats in certain of
the modifications; the ñoats may, however, be
cut, if desired, the cutting aiding the elasticity. 60
The cutting would, preferably, be by an operation
5 the last plain plated Wale 3| is followed by the
first lap stripe Wale 32 adjacentv to which are the
intermediate wales 33, 34, 35 or the lap stripe- area,
65 said intermediate Wales being identical with the
intermediate wales 23, 24, 25 of Fig. 4, in that the
subsequent to the knitting Aof the stocking or
other fabric and is therefore not herein disclosed,
not forming a necessary part of the invention.
While in the foregoing description, reference
has been made to plain plating and plain plated
lap stripe yarn alone is knitted the others ?loat- . Wales, it will be understood that such language
ing. The last lap stripe Wale 36 as Well as the ñrst is intended .to cover, as Well, reverse plated areas
lap stripe Wale 32, are formed by floating the plat
within or about-plain plated areas, “plain plated
70 ing yarn 38 and knitting the body and lap stripe wales” being merely used to distinguish from 70
yarns 39 and 4I] respectively. The last Wale 31 ls Wales as herein disclosed, where the lap stripe
plain plated as in the other forms. In this form plating or other yarn or yarns is combined with
the plain plating yarn floats and interlocks or~ the body and plain plating yarns.
passes between the lap stripe float and the knit
The invention is not necessarily restricted to
in wales of the lap stripe yarn.
the knitting-in of the third yarn by means of the 75
„
lap stripe method but broadly involves the
knitting-in of a third thread or threads by any
method and controlling the three or more yarns
or threads in such a manner that one or two
v only of the said three or more yarns are knit-in
.
3
_casema
at certain of the wales, the others Boating.
The preferred form, Fig. 2, shows a striping
yarn knit-in together with the body yarn, the
plain plating yarn floating throughout the
\10 striped area; Fig. 3 shows substantially the same
ing to the next loop or stitch where it is again
knitted into the fabric in a following course.
2. A knitted fabric having two body yarns, _one
of which is' a plating yarn, and a wrap thread, a
body yarn being floated at some of the wrap 91
‘stitches or loops, the number of which wrap
stitches or loops varies from course to course,
some of the wrap stitches or loops each being
characterized by the thread being knitted at such _
y loop or stitch and such thread also floating 'to 10
arrangement except that the plain plating yarn
the next loop or stitch where it is again knitted
striping area; Fig. 4 is similar to Fig. 3 except
that in the modification disclosed in said Fig. 4
15 both the main or body yarn and the plain plating
the other body yarn inl every course but not at
‘ is also knit-in at the first and last wales of the - ’into the fabric in a following course,-and wherein
y yarn`ñoat across the wales intermediate the first
the plating body yarn is knitted >together with
every wale.
'
'
f
~
3. A knitted fabric having two body yarns, one
and last striping wales, i. e., where the striping ' of which is a plating yarn, and a wrap thread,
a body yarn being floated at some of the wrap.
yarn is knit-in; Fig. 5 the body yarn only is knit
in?with the striping yarn at the first and last stitches or loops, the ynumber of which wrap
stitches or loops varies from course to course,
20 wales of the stripe, the plain plating yarn float
ingY throughout the stripe and the body yarn some of thé wrap stitches orloops each being
across the intermediate wales of the said stripe; characterized by the thread being knitted at such
Fig. 6 shows the striping yarn alone knit-in'in loop or stitch and such thread also floating to
the striping area, the body and plain plating the .next loop or stitch where it is again knitted
into the fabric in a following course, and wherein
. 25 yarns' ñoating.
In Fig. 8 the wrap stripe thread 56 is shown as
being knitted into the fabric at wales b9, [email protected] and
6i, being first knitted into wales tt and 6i only
and then being knitted into Wale [email protected] only. y
In Fig. 9 the wales G2, »tt and til are shown as
having incorporated therein wrap stripe threads
V65, 66,' 6l respectively, the wrap stripe thrœlds d5
and tl being first knitted into the fabric at wales
t2 and 6i after which the thread tt is knitted
into the fabric at Wale 63.
4
In Figs. 8 and 9 the respective plating, body
threads 68 and 69 are shown as being knitted
into the fabric at some wales and fioating across
intermediate wales at which wales wrap stripe
40 threads 58, 65, 66 or 61 are knitted.
Referring to Fig. l0, -a slight modification is
shown wherein a body portion ‘l0 has been knitted
25 "
the plating body yarn is knitted together with
the other body yarn in every course but not at
every Wale, and the' Wrap thread is knitted at
some of the stitches with one of the body yarns.
t. A knitted fabric having a body yarn and 30
awrap thread, such body yarn being floated at
some of the wrap stitches or loops, the number of
which wrap stitches or loops varies from course
,
to course, some of the wrap stitches or loops each
being characterized by the thread being knitted 35
at such loop or stitch and such thread also float
ing to the next loop or stitch Where it is again
knitted into the fabric in a following course, and>
wherein the wrap thread is knitted at some of
the stitches, with the said body yarn.
5. A knitted fabric having two body yarns and
a. wrap thread, one such body yarn being floated
with a body yarn 1I and an ornamental area ' at some of the wrap stitches or loops, the number
Y generally designated at 12, of a diamond shaped of which wrap stitches or loops varies from course
outline, is knitted from a yarn 13. This fabric to course, some of the wrap stitches or loops each
is similar to that of Fig. 4 and has the wrapped
being characterized by the thread being knitted
area knitted solid rather than open at spots as _ at such loop or stitch and such thread also float
shown at C, Fig. l. Floats 14 ofthe body yarn
ing tothe next loop or stitch Where it is again
knitted into the fabric in a following course, and
5o floats 15 of the ornamental yarn passfto the back . wherein a wrap thread is knitted together with
of the ornamental area and vextend between the both of the body yarns at some of the stitches
opposite ends of the courses making up vsaid and with one only of the said body yarns at other
pass behind the ornamental area 12 and other
ornamental area.
All the modifications have in commonfthe idea
65 of floating, at least, one of the body and plain
plating yarns to the rear of, at least, some of the
striping wales, or, in other words,-they all dis
_ close the knitting-in at some ofthe striping wales,
'of one yarn or two, not more than two yarns
having knitted loops at some of the said striping
Wales.
-
_
Although specific forms of the fabric structure
have been disclosed, the invention i's not limited
to the fabrics specifically described but includes
65 all modifications thereof that fall within. the
scope of the appended claims.
We claim:
f
'
e 1. A knitted fabric havinga body yarn and a
70 ~wrap thread, such Vbody yarn being floated at
some vof the wrap stitches or 1oops,'the number
of which wrap stitches or loops varies from course
to course, some of the wrap stitches or loops each
being characterized by the thread being knitted
75 at such loop or stitch and such thread also ñoat
4
50
_
,
stitches, at which stitches the non-knitted yarn
is floated.
'
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6. A plain knit fabric comprising a main web 55
knit from a body yarn and having an ornamentally
configured area with float skips ofthe body yarn
across varying numbers of wales in successive _
courses of the fabric; and a plain knit fill-in web
completely closing the ornamentally configured
60
area, formed from contrasting yarn, said main _
and> ñll-in webs being connected only by inter
loopment of contiguous loops of the two yarns at
the edges of the ornamentally configured area
and the contrasting yarn being floated at the 65
back ofthe fabric between opposite end loops of
contiguous courses of the fill-in web.
7. The method of producing ornamented knit
fabrics which comprises knittinga plain web
from a body yarn with formation of float skips
across varying numbers of wales in successive
courses of the knitting ; and concurrently closing
the skips by knitting a ñll-in web from a separate
'contrasting yarn in such manner that only con
tiguous edge loops of the two webs are intercon
4-
2,150,778
nected, and the contrasting yarn in ñoated at the
back of the fabric between opposite end loops of
contiguous courses of said ñll-in web.
8. A plain knit fabric comprising a main web
tween opposite end loops of contiguous courses of
the fill-in web.
9. 'I'he method of producing ornamented knit
knit from a body yarn and having an ornamen
fabrics which comprises knitting a plain web
from a body yard with formation of ñoat skips 5
taliy configured area with ñoat skips of the body
in successive courses of the knitting; and concur
yarn in successive courses of the fabric; and a
rently closing the skips by knitting a ñli-in web
plain knit ñll-in web completely closing the or
from a separate contrasting yarn in such manner
namentally conñgured area, formed from con
connected only by interloopment of contiguous
that only contiguous edge loops of the two webs
areA interconnected, and the contrasting yarn is 10
ñoated at the back of the fabric between opposite
loops of the two yarns at the edges of the orna
end loops of contiguous courses of said ñil-in web,
trasting yarn, said main and fill-in Webs being
mentally conñgured area and the contrasting
yarn being floated at the back of the fabric be
JOHN LAWSON.
ROBERT H. LAWSON.
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