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‘ April 1' 1947.
E. E. LAMBERT
I’
WOVEN FIBRE RUG
Filed Jan. 4, 1946
'2 Sheets-Sheet 1
%
z_
_
1.9.,
INVENTOR.
[RA/EST f: LAMBERT
3M
ATTORNEX
April 1, 19470
E; E_ LAMBERT
2,418,215
WOVEN FIBRE RUG
Filed Jan. 4, 194a '
@792
20
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
2b
-
INVENTOR.
fmvssrf. L AMBERT ,
Big/3:44 4
A TTOR/VEX
Patented Apr. 1V,,l947.
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T name _> STATES .‘PATENT ~5 oF-IncEf/“f
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‘
2;41s,215 g. .
fWQVENFIBRE‘RIJGY
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‘
‘ Ernest E‘. Lambert, ssang?aamss, assign“ to v.Patchogue-l?lyn1outh Mills‘ Corporation, New.
‘
_ 1 Application
'York, N. Y.‘IJanuary
a corporation
4, 1946,ofNew
SerialYork.
No. 639,070
‘ .‘ j
‘11 Claims.
('01. Isa-42051-
This invention" relates to ‘woven, ‘paper-?bre
‘
‘
, a
or as’a series ‘of groups arranged ‘according to
rugsand a new method of- fabricating the same.
It is particularly applicable to ?bre rugs woven
from colored paperthreads; I
'
" 'l
their respectiveicolor combinations. ‘In one sug
~ gestedarrangement the threads may be stag
~
geredin- the warp so 'that'the body‘ of‘ithe ?bre
Heretoforerugs have been ‘woven frompapere. 5 rug. 1. when; woven simulates the appearance of
?bre threads of various colors. The ‘papers-?bre
threads in turn havebeen formed ‘from colored
,coloredwbands of .threadsxof gradually varying
, ;-width;x:forming =light orwdark‘ Iareas of shading
paper ribbons twisted together in a twisting 'ma
"suggesting :a ' :softroverall“ mottled,‘ heather, »or
chine ‘to fashion the ?nished thread. These
' moire textural e?e’ct.
i
i'
w
1
paper-?bre threads have been twisted eitherin 10 a In thev drawings comprising two sheets of eight
one solid color or. in a pencil stripe of two colors.
The ‘use of paper-?bre threads in solid colors
'
- ?gures: numbered ‘Figs. 1 to 8 inclusive,‘ one sug
ingested embodiment ‘of the invention is inns
and in pencil stripes, necessarily limits the weav-
trated.
er’s art in the fabrication of woven paper-?bre
‘
i‘
3* 1w or;
Fig. 1 is a ‘frOntNieWf'Of'
'
,
woven paper-fibre
rugs
fects, to
thus
conventional,
restricting the
patterns
‘?eld of
andusefulness
optical efof l5i rug
i Fig.
reduced
2 is a front
in size.‘
viewxzof afragm'ent' of
i wtheirug
the rugs and the resulting demand therefor in
contained within theidotted -lines.~"2.—.521'ofIFig; 1,
the trade.
enlarged to approximatelythe 'actuali'sizeof the
-
p
‘
One object of thisinvention is to enlarge the
woven fabric;
?eld of the‘weaver’s art as applied to the optical 20
‘ r
.
i
'
.i.c.
‘ i
2Q‘:
Fig. 3 is a vertical cross sectionalbviewtaken
effects and patterns which can be produced in
along the line 3+3 off-mp2 looking-inlth'e’direc
rugs
Another
wovenfrom
objectpaper-‘?bre:
is an‘ improveds woven paper-
tion.
Fig;
of 4the
is arrows:
a longitudinal
I
, =‘view
. ‘partially
. r
broken
fibre rug.
away of one of the improved warp threads with
‘
>
'
Another object isa paper-?bre rug woven'with 25 portions of the paper ribbons separated to show
an
improved
construction
of ‘ colored
paper
the construction of the twist;
thread.
Another object is a paper-?bre rug of new and
heretofore unconventional patte .~
‘ .'
‘
H ‘
" '
‘
Fig._ 5 is a, longitudinal view of a' portionqoi’ a
Uther objects will appear from ‘the detailed
.
conventional stri ‘Jed thready ~
. '
.
i 1 ‘
Fig. 6, is a ‘blown-up View Of a Section Of the
30 thread?f Fig- 4;‘
' description which follows;
In accordance with this invention; certain of
the paper-?bre threads woven for examplein the
warp of the rug, are made frompaper ribbons
1
>
'
‘
'
Fig. 7 is a transverse cross sectional view taken
along the line T‘—‘7 ofqFig- 4 looking in the. direc
?lm 0f the arrows; and
\
~ . ~
‘
Fig. 8 is a transverse cross sectional‘ view taken
of" different colors which are twisted into. threads 35 along the line 3-28 of Fig. 6 looking in the direc
in such a manner that one colored paper ribbon
forms an inner layer and another and differently
tion of the arrows.
.
'
'
‘
Like reference characters desigliate' corre
colored paper ribbon forms the .outer layer or _
spohding partstbmuehoutthe Several ?gures 0f
coverinq of a substantial length of the paper- ‘
the drawings.‘
' '
-
‘?bre, thread, and thereafter the twist in the 40 The ?bre 111810 (Fig-'1) is woven from paper—
thread is modi?ed to reverse the relative posi?bre threads of various 00101‘8- Paper-?bre
tions of the paper ribbons so, that the'ribbon
threads. made by twisting‘ ribbons of “km-ft”
which previously formed the covering becomes
paper give good results.‘ Therugl? includes the
the inner layer and the paper ribbon which pre.usual warp threads ll—ll and the ?lling 0!‘
viously formed the inner‘layer becomes the outer 45 pick threads l2-|2 (Figs. 2 and 3), woven to
layer or covering of-the thread for a substantial
length thereof.
The resulting twistedpaper- .
form a reversible .fabl‘ic-
. . i ‘
‘
The paper-?bre threads forming the ?lling o'r
?bre ‘thread accordingly has a covering, envelope
pick I! may be of any conventional .type. " ‘They
or Jacket, which alternatesxin color over sub.may include paper-?bre threads made by twist
stantial lengths thereof‘ to produce a‘ thread of 50 ling ribbons'of colored paper ‘together to form the
variegated twist, sometimes referred to by. those
uniformly striped thread shown‘ in Fig. ‘5. The
skilled in the art as a “jazz”_thread. These variethread ‘I2 (Fig. 5) includes at least‘ two paper
gated threads may be twisted in various color
ribbons l6 and H of‘ different colors‘, uniformly
combinations, ‘and shadings as desired. The
twisted together to. form‘ a spirally striped
threads may be assembled in the warp as a group 55 threads InJFig. 5 a white paper ribbon l6 and
2,418,216
a green paper ribbon I‘! are twisted together to
construct the striped paper ?bre thread l2’, which
in this instance will be a green and white pencil
stripe. Any other combination of “colored rib-‘
bobs I6 and I‘! may be used.
.
The body of the woven fabric of the ?bre rug
III also includes my improved thread of variegated
Fig. 7 the paper ribbon ls forms the. inner layer, ’
and the paper ribbon I4, the outer covering or
envelope of the thread II, while in Fig. 8 the rela
tive positions of the ribbons I4 and I5 are re
versed so that the twisted ribbon I4 now con
stitutes the inner layer 'and the twisted paper‘
ribbonv I5 the'outer covering or envelope of the
twist. This construction is illustrated in Figs.
paper-?bre thread II._’
‘
I
4, 6, 7. and 8. One continuously twisted paper
My variegated thread may be used by the weav
ribbon forms the stuffer or core I3. A plurality 10 ers to produce many novel optical effects in re
of other differently colored paper ribbons I4v and
versible woven paper-?bre rugs. One of these
I5 are twisted around'the stu?‘er in such a man
novel effects is disclosed in the woven construc
ner that one of the paper ribbons, for example the
tion shown in Figs. 2 and 3. The variegated
ribbon I4, constitutes the inner layer for a sub
threads I I are used in the warp of the rug I0, and
stantial length of the thread I I, and the other
are disposed in juxtaposition to form bands of
paper ribbon, for example the ribbon I5 consti
different colors. These groups may if desired be
tutes the outer or covering layer of the thread I I
separated by warp markers I8 which are merely
for the said length thereof. Throughout this
variegated, or by other threads of distinctive
length of the thread II the twisted inner ribbon
co’oring.
,
'
I4 is entirely concealed by the twisted outer ribbon 20 The/threads may also be woven so that the color
I5 which forms the outside iacket or covering of
changes are staggered to produce bands of'varyins
the thread I I. After the ribbons which form the
widths of color. In this arrangement the coloring
thread II have been thus twisted for a substantial
of adjoining bands of warp threads tapers off to
distance. the twist is modi?ed to reverse the rela
blend with the coloring of adjoining bands of
tive positions of the paper ribbons I4 and I5.- '
25 warp threads which may be of a complementary
In the transitional step of the reversing oper
coloring effect. In a rug so woven the overall ef~
ation a relatively short section of striped thread
fect may be said to simulate in eye appearance,
will be fabricated, as is best illustrated by way
the moire effect in cloth, a mottled. effect, or per
of example in the intermediate section of Fig. 4,‘
haps the, grain‘ in a piece of wood. The varying
which discloses each of the paper ribbons I4 and
widths of the changing hands of coloring taper—
I5 spirally twisted around the stuffer I3 to pro-/
ing off until they merge with one another produce
duce a striped threadthe colors in the stripe (in
a gradual changeover from the lighter to, the
this case red and brown). being determined by
darker shades and back again, so that the eye
the colors of the paper ribbons I4 and I5. The‘
appearance of the changes in coloring is 'not sharp
length of the striped section will be determined 35 and distinct, but shades o?' softly, giving a sooth
by the speed of operation of the twist modifying
mechanism of the twisting machine. vBy arrest
ing the movement of the twist modifying mech
ing overall e?ect to the woven paper-?bres.
.
The fabric I0 is provided with a non-ravelling
selvage edge I9 which is formed by looping back
anism of the twisting machine, at a predeter
the ?lling or pick threads I! at the edge of the
mined intermediate ‘point, the thread may 'be 40 fabric, thus producing a non-ravelling ?nished
changed from a thread of variegated twist to a
running edge.
,
pencil stripe or other thread of uniform stripe.
The stuifer I3 however, remains concealed be
The woven fabric is cut into suitable lengths
. according to the size of rug desired, and the ends
are ?nished off in any suitable manner to pre
neath the twisted ribbons I4 and I5.
After the transition is completed the relative 45 vent unravelling. One method of ?nishing off
positions of the ribbons I4 and I5 are reversed.
the top and bottom'edges is shown in Figs. 2 and
The-twisted paper ribbon I5 now forms the inner
3. A strip of binding material 20 of suitable
layer and is completely hidden by the twisted
width is folded over to cover the raw- edge of
paper ribbon I4 which now constitutes the ‘outer
the woven fabric. The binding material 20 is
layer or covering of the paper ?bre thread II.
then secured to the marginal edge of the woven
This section of the thread II presents the ap
fabric by parallel lines of stitching 2| and 22 ex
pearance of a twisted thread solid red in color.
tending through the marginal edge of the woven
The paper ribbons I4 and I5 which form the
fabric from front to back and traversing the sur
thread II may consist of a relatively unlimited
face of the fabric from one ,selvage edge I9 to the
variety of color combinations. The ribbons I4 55 other (compare Figs. 2, 3 and 1).
"
and I5 may be of highly contrasting colors or they
What is claimed is:
may be two shades of the same color, as for ex
1. A reversible woven rug fabric comprising
ample, one ribbon may be a light shade and the
paper-?bre threads, certain of said threads being
other a dark shade, or one ribbon may be a bright
fabricated out of distinctively colored comple
shade and the other a pastel shade. In the speci 60 mentary paper ribbons twisted to sub-divide the
men shown in Figs. 4, and 6 to 8 the paper ribbon
resulting thread into substantial lengths having
I4 is indicated in red and the paper‘ ribbon IS
the‘ distinctive color of‘but one of said paper rib
in brown.- As the stuffer I3 is entirely ‘con?
bons alternating with other substantial lengths
cealed by the paper ribbons I4 and I 5, its color is
having the distinctive color of said complemen
unimportant.
'
The construction of the paper ?bre threadv II
may perhaps be better understood from the
blown-up view of Fig. 6 and the transverse cross
sectional views of Figs. 7 and 8. In these views
65 tary paper ribbon,‘ said ribbons asthus twisted
forming a variegated thread, the said variegated
threads being arranged side-by side and woven
in the same direction in the rug fabric, said
' threads being arranged with their adjoining
the paper ribbon I3 represents the stuffer or .eore 70 lengths overlapping according to the color of
of the ?bre thread II. It is covered by one of they
twisted paper ribbons, which forms the inner
layer. This inner layer is in turn covered by the
other twisted paper ribbon which forms the outer
or ‘covering layer of the twisted ?bre thread. In
the paper ribbon exposed in‘ the length of thread
to form overlapping bands having the color of
only one of the said paper ribbons alternating '
with and overlapped by other bands having‘the
color of the said complementary ribbonL and each
5
2,41$,215
of said bands varying in width in accordance
with “the distinctive changes in color of saiddis
tinctively colored lengths.
2. A reversible rug fabric comprising paper
fibre threads, certain of said. threads being fab
ricated out of a plurality of distinctively colored
6
each successive thread partially overlaps the dis-- ‘
tinctive coloring of the adjoining thread to pro
duce bands of one distinctive color ‘gradually
changing into bands of another distinctive color
thus simulating a moire ‘textural e?ect, binding
cloth folded over to enclose the raw edges of the
complementary paper ribbons so twisted as to
rug fabric, and spaced parallel lines of stitches
sub-divide the resulting thread into substantial
traversing both sides of the folded binding cloth
lengths having the distinctive color of but one of
and extending through the fabric of the rug from
said paper ribbons separated by other substan '10 side edge to side edge thereof to form non-rav
tial lengths having the distinctive color of said
elling ?nished edges for the rug.
‘ ,
r _
complementary paper ribbon, the said threads
‘ 6. A reversible rug woven from paper-?bre
constituting the warp threads of the fabric, said
threads, certain of said threads each containing
warp threads being arranged in groups selected,
at least three paper ribbons including a stui’fer
in accordance with the color of the paper ribbon 15 and a plurality of distinctively colored ribbons
exposed in the length of thread, the lengths of
forming substantially concentric complementary
adjoining warp threads overlapping according to
layers substantially surrounding said stuffer,
color to form bands having the color of one of the
each of the said ribbons alternately forming the
said paper ribbons alternating with other bands
distinctively colored outer layer of‘ said thread
having the color of the said complementary rib
thereby dividing successive portions thereof into
bon, said overlapping bands extending across the '20 distinctively colored lengths, the said threads be
rug from selvage edge to selvage edge thereof,
ing positioned side by side as the warp of the
and each of said bands varying in width in ac
cordance with the progressive changes in color
fabric with their similarly colored outer layers
staggered to partially overlap the distinctively
of successive warp threads of ‘an arranged group. 25 colored outer layers of the adjoining warp
3. A reversible rug fabric woven from paper
threads to produce bands of one distinctive color
fibre threads, certain of said threads each con
'gradually changing into bands of another dis
taining at least three paper ribbons including a
tinctive color thus imparting a moire textural
stu?er and a plurality of distinctively colored
effect to the pattern of the rug, a plurality of
ribbons forming substantially concentric com 30 strips of binding cloth, each of said strips being
plementary layers enclosing said stu?er, each of
folded over to enclose one of the raw edges of the
the said ribbons alternately forming the dis~
rug fabric, and lines of stitches traversing both
tinctively colored outer layer of, said thread
plies of afolded strip of binding cloth and ex—
thereby dividing successive portions thereof into
tending through both plies of the binding cloth
distinctively colored lengths, the said threads be 35 and through the rug fabric from side edge to side
ing positioned side by side and woven in the same
edge thereof to form non-ravelling ?nished edges
direction in the rug fabric, and said threads be
ing woven in the fabric with their similarly col
ored lengths staggered so that each successive
for the rug. ’
?bre threads, certain of said threads each con
bons as thus twisted forming a variegated thread
woven into the rug fabric as an integral part
7. A reversible woven rugfabric comprising
paper-?bre threads, certain of‘said threads be
thread partially overlaps the distinctive coloring 40 ing fabricated out of distinctively colored com
of its adjoining thread to produce bands of one
plementary paper ribbons twisted together to
distinctive color gradually changing into bands
sub-divide the resultingthread into substantial
of another distinctive color thereby softening the
lengths having the distinztive color of but one of
impact of the changes in color tone to produce
said paper ribbons alternating with other sub
an overall woven textural e?'ect.
stantial lengths having the distinctivev color of
4. A reversible rue fabric woven from paper
said complementary paper ribbon, and said rib
taining at least three paper ribbons including a
stuffer and a plurality of distinctively colored
ribbons forming substantially concentric com
plementary layers enclosing said stufl’er, each of
thesaid ribbons alternately‘forming the distinc
' tively colored outer layer of said thread thereby
dividing successive portions thereof into distinc
tively colored lengths, and the said threads be
ing arranged side by side as the warp of the fab
ric with their similarly colored“ outer layers stag
gered to partially overlap the distinctively colored
outer layers of the adjoining warp threads to
of the pattern.
8. A' textile fabric'comprising threads, individ
ually formed by twisting together a plurality of ‘
ribbons .of differently colored, paper in concen
trio layers, said ribbons alternating from the in
ner layer to the outer layer of each twisted
.thread and back again, to present substantial
lengths of each ribbon in succession, and the re
sulting threads being woven into the body of the
fabric as a constituent part of the pattern.
9. A reversible woven rug fabric comprising
produce bands of one distinctive color gradually 60 ribbons of differently colored paper. said ribbons
changing into bands of another distinctive color
being twisted together coaxially to form a thread
thus simulating a moire textural effect.
having at least two concentric layers of different
5. A reversible rug woven from paper-?bre
colors, substantial lengths of said ribbons alter
threads, certain of said threads each containing
nating between the inner and the outer layers
at least three paper ribbons including a stu?fer
to fashion successive lengths of the thread in
and a plurality of other distinctively colored rib
alternating colors, and the thread being selec
bons forming substantially concentric comple
tively woven into the body of the rug fabric as
mentary layers enclosing said stu?er, each of the
an integral par-t of the pattern.
said ribbons alternately forming the distinctive
10. A textile fabric comprising paper ribbons of
1y colored outer layer of said thread and dividing
diiferent colors twisted coaxially to use substan
successive portions thereof into distinctively col~
tial lengths of each of said ribbons in succession
ored lengths, the said threads being positioned
as the covering ribbons of the coaxial threads
side by side and Woven in the same direction in
thus formed, and said coaxial threads. being se~
the rug fabric, said threads being woven with
lectively grouped in the fabric in accordance with
their similarly coloredlengths staggered so that
the color changes of their covering ribbons to
i
‘
2,410,215
8
form variegatedrwoven bands which constitute
a. part of the fabric pattern.
" 11. A reversible rug i'aoric woven from paper
?bre threads, certain of said threads each con
taining a stu?er and a plurality of ribbons of 5
distinctively colored paper forming substantially
concentric complementary layers enclosing said
' stu?er, ‘each or the said ribbons alternately torm
ing'the outer layer of said thread thereby divid
REFERENCES CITED
The following references are of record in the
?le 01' this patent:
UNI'IED STATES PATENTS
Number
2,168,696
2,348,230
ing successive portions thereof into distinctively 10
colored lengths, and the said threads being woven
into the rug fabric as an integral part of the inat
tem.
v
ERNEST E. LAMBERT.
'
Number
195,640
Name '
Date
Beck _- ____________ __ ‘Aug. 8, 1939
Spielmann ________ __ May 9, 1944 a
FOREIGN PATENTS
v
Country
v
Date
British ___________ __ Oct, 25, 1923
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