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Aug- 5, 1947. ,
|_. B. COUNTERMAN
2,425,176
EXPLOSIVE CARTRIDGE UNIT
Filed Aug. 4, 1943
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FIG.
If!I!Iw
FIG. 4
FIG. 3
INVENTOR.
l-‘MIIS B. Countcrrnam
BY’
wua ($5 gw‘umg.
v
AT TORN
Patented Aug. 5, 1947
UNITED
' 2,25,17
STATES
.
2,425,176
_ EXPLOSIVE CARTRIDGE UNIT
Lewis B. Counterman, Kenvil, N. 1., assignor to
Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, lDeL,
a corporation of Delaware
'
Application August 4, 1943, Serial No. 497,288
3 Claims. (Cl. 102-24)
2
1
a force tending to move the sleeve and car
This invention relates to an improved explo
tridge from engaged to disengaged position.
sive cartridge unit and more particularly to an
Accordingly, the objects of this invention are
explosive cartridge unit comprising a cartridge
realized by providing an explosive unit compris
and a sleeve, each part having a lock-forming
ing a cartridge ?lled with explosive, a sleeve, and
means adapted to be moved into locked relation
ship with each other in response to a force tend~ ' a chipboard thread spirally carried on the inside
and outside of the sleeve and cartridge respec
ing to move the parts from engaged to disengaged
tively, each thread having a common pitch and
position, and to an assembly of these units.
directed in a common direction and having the
In certain blasting work as, for example, in
edges thereof serrated. The threads are rela
the seismograph blasting art, it is necessary to
tively dimensioned with respect to each other to
assemble a. number of explosive units in order to
permit free-threading engagement of the sleeves
build up a charge sufficient in strength to serve
with the cartridges.
the purpose for which it is to be employed. Many
Having now indicated in a general way the
methods have been devised for accomplishing this
assembly of units. Sleeves movable into fric 15 nature and purpose of this invention there fol
lows a more detailed description of the preferred
tional and telescopic engagement with adjacent
embodiments thereof, with reference being had
pairs of cartridges have been used but the length
of the assembly is limited by the holding power
to the accompanying drawing in which:
Fig. 1 is a view showing the sleeve and car
developed by any one sleeve through its fric
tional engagement with the cartridges. Spiral 20 tridge of an explosive unit in nearly full-threaded
engagement;
‘
I
threads have been provided for both the car
Fig. 2 is a. part sectional and part elevational
tridge and sleeve; however, the provision of a fast
view showing the cartridge of one unit in thread
thread which is necessary in order to expedite
ed engagement with the extended sleeve of an
assembly of the units, has the disadvantage of
permitting the units to become disengaged when
other unit;
'
Fig. 3 is a sectional fragmentary view showing
the cartridge thread in free-threading relation
ship to the threaded recess of the sleeve;
Fig. 4 is similar to Fig. 3 but showing the car
sirable features.
,
Therefore, it is an object of this invention to 30 tridge thread in serrated engagement with the
provide an explosive unit comprising a car
sleeve thread.
Referring to the drawing, numerali indicates
tridge, a sleeve, and thread means carried by
the cartridge and numeral 2, the sleeve of the
these parts adapted to permit free assembly of
explosive unit‘. These parts may be fabricated in
the units into threaded engagement with each
any well known manner of any suitable material
other and to prevent separation of the units by
as, for example, paper, cardboard, metal, or plas
automatic movement of the thread means into
tic. Fabrication may be accomplished by assem
locked position with each other inresponse to
bling a number of individual parts as hereinafter
an axially applied force.
to be explained or by means of a. molding oper
Another object is to provide a rigid unitary
assembly of explosive units, the cartridges of each us ation when plastics are being used.
The sleeve 2 may be formed from various parts
unit being held in position by means of sleeves
by feeding a thread-forming strip 3 onto a man
received in threaded engagement with adjacent
drel or other suitable support (not shown) at a
cartridges, each cartridge being held against sep
predetermined pitch to form a continuous
aration from the other by means of serrated
thread-receiving recess 4. The strip 3 may be
threads carried by the cartridges and sleeves, the
fed onto the mandrel to form the recess in such
serrated threads being movable into serrated en
a way that the recess may spiral either from left
gagement with each other in response to a force
to right throughout the sleeve or from right to
tending to move the parts from engaged to dis;
a column of any appreciable length is made up.
It is desirable to obviate this disadvantage of
the fast threads and still retain,all of their de
engaged position.
Still another object is to provide an explosive
unit comprising a cartridge, a sleeve,-and chip
board threads carried on the outsideand inside
respectively of each of the parts, the edges of
the threads being serrated and movable into ser
rated engagement with each other in response to 55
left, the only effect produced being in the direc
tion in which the sleeve is turned to assemble it
‘with a cartridge. The strip is of such width as
to be wound in an open layer, the space or recess
4 between adjacent sides of the strip being of
such width as to accommodate the cartridge
thread 5 in free-threading relationship herein
2,425,176
3
after to be described. Another strip is then fed
over the thread-forming strip 3 to form a tubu
lar casing 6. Adhesive is applied to the inner
surface of the tubular-casing-forming strip to se
cure a bond between the casing 8 and the strip
3. Winding, advancing, and cutting of the cas
ing thus formed to a desired length produces the
threaded sleeve of the explosive unit. Prefer
ably, the sleeves are formed in such a way that
the ends of the strip 3 terminate short of the 10
ends of the sleeve so that the cartridge may be ’
4
ment with the cutters. The thread-forming strip
is then fed to the serrating wheels where the
roller maintains the strip in proper cutting rela
tionship with the wheels.
The serrated thread receiving recess 4 is formed
wide enough to receive the serrated cartridge
thread 5 in free-threading or free-floating rela
tionship. This free-threading arrangement of
parts permits the cartridge l and sleeve 2 to be
engaged with each other by merely twisting the
two parts in opposite directions relative to each
other. This free-threading relationship is clear
ly shown in Fig. 3.
easily inserted into either of the smooth un
threaded ends of the sleeve.
When it is desired to assemble a number of the
The cartridge I may be of the usual paper
units
into a charge of a predetermined strength,
15
wrapped type. The cartridge may be formed by
the units, the cartridge and sleeve of which are
feeding a tube-forming strip (not shown) onto
generally received in the ?eld in coextensive re
a, mandrel (not shown) to form a tubular body
element upon which is fed a band 5 which forms
the cartridge thread 5. The band may be fed into
lationship to each other, are adjusted so as to
move the sleeve and cartridge out of substantial
1y full engagement and into half engagement as
position in such a way as to form a thread which 20 shown by the sleeve and one cartridge of one unit
spirals either from left to right throughout the
length of the cartridge or from right to left, the
only effects produced being those described with
respect to the sleeve. In every case the spiral di
rection in an assembly of sleeves and cartridges
will be in a common direction. Preferably, the
cartridge thread 5 terminates short of the ends
of the cartridge so that entry of the cartridge into
the smooth ends of the sleeve is facilitated.
of Fig. 2.
Several units are extended in this
manner. The extended units are then assembled
by moving the exposed cartridge of one unit into
the extended sleeve of another unit and so on
until an assembly is built up of the desired length
or explosive strength. It is preferred to have the
sleeve and cartridge of each unit of the same
length since in this way the cartridges may be
joined together in a rigid manner due in part to
30
Where paper-wrapped cartridges i and paper
the fact that the sleeves are in abutting end-to
or cardboard sleeves ‘2 are employed, the thread
end relationship to each other forming a substan
forming bands 3 and 5 may be made of paper or
tially continuous tubular reinforcing and joining
cardboard of a substantial thickness commonly
member for the cartridges. However, sleeves of
referred to as chipboard.
a length shorter than the cartridge may be used
The cartridges I and sleeves 2 are provided with
to join the cartridges together.
a fast or low pitched thread in order to save time
during assembly of the units.
In order to overcome the tendency of the low
pitched thread to slip and permit separation of
certain of the units when a number of the units
have been assembled and the assembly is being
lowered into a vertical borehole, it has been dis
covered that serrations 1 formed on each side of
the cartridge and sleeve threads will effectively
eliminate all slippage between adjacent thread
surfaces. The locking effect of the serrated
threads when moved into serrated engagement as
shown by Fig. 4 was tested using axially applied
forces of 300 pounds and over. No signs of sepa
ration of one cartridge from another were ob
served up to the point where the assembly began
to fail structurally. It is preferred to provide the
sleeve and cartridge threads with serrations 5/64
of an inch deep, measured from the peak of one
serration or notched portion to the trough of ad
jacent serrations, and {is of an inch Wide, meas
ured from the peak of one serration to the peak
of the next. It is preferred to form the serra
tions on each edge or side of the chipboard
thread-forming strip for both the sleeve and the
cartridge.
When one side of each of the sleeve and car
tridge threads is serrated, assembly of the parts
must be made in such a way as to position the ser
rated edges in adjacent relationship to each
other. In order to do this, it is necessary to have
two types of cartridges and sleeves, one type of
which has serrations on one side of the threads
and the other type of which has serrations on
the other side of the threads. Serration on both
edges of each thread eliminates this necessity.
The thread-forming strips may be serrated by
means of a pair of case-hardened steel cutting
wheels (not shown) properly spaced and an idler
When the explosive column of assembled units
the col
is ready to be inserted into a borehole
umn is moved to a vertical position
weight of each cartridge is sufficient to
force throughout the column in response
and the
set up a
to which
adjacent edges of the sleeve and cartridge threads
move into serrated engagement with each other.
This serrated engagement may also be brought
about by means of an axial force set up in the
column due to the movement of the sleeve into
end~to-end abutting relationship to each other.
In this way, the column is locked against separa
tion before it is moved to a vertical position.
From the foregoing description, it is apparent
that the objects of this invention havebeen ac
complished ‘by providing an explosive unit com
prising a sleeve, a cartridge and serrated threads
carried by the sleeve and cartridge, the threads
of which are movable into serrated engagement
with each other in response to an axially applied
force and thereby locking each unit against sepa
ration from the other.
What I claim and desire to protect by Letters
Patent is:
1. In an explosive device comprising a plural
ity of ‘explosive units, each unit including a car
tridge and a sleeve of substantially a ‘common
length, the cartridges being held in propagating
65 relationship to each other by means of said
sleeves extending across adjacent cartridge ends
and forming a substantially continuous tubular
'reinforcing and joining member for said car
tridges, the improvement comprising a, chipboard
thread carried on the exterior of each of said
cartridges, and a chipboard thread receiving re
cess formed in the interior of each of said sleeves,
said cartridge threads being receivable in free
threadable relationship with said recesses, lock
roller (not shown)‘ maintained in close adjust~ 75 forming serrations carried by said threads and
2,425,176
6
said recesses, said threads being slidable into
relationship to each other by means of said’
serrated engagement with said recesses in re
sponse to a force tending to longitudinally pull
the cartridge from the sleeve, whereby said car
tridges are held in locked engagement with each
sleeves extending across adjacent cartridge ends
and forming a. substantially continuous tubular
reinforcing and joining member for said car-,
tridges, the improvement comprising a chipboard
other in said sleeves.
2. In an explosive device comprising a plural
ity of explosive units, each unit including a, car
thread carried =n the exterior of each of said
tridge and a sleeve of substantially a common
said cartridge threads being receivable in free
threadable relationship with said recesses, uni
form lock-forming serrations formed on at least
length, the cartridges being held in propagating
relationship to each other by means of said sleeves
‘extending across adjacent cartridge ends and
forming a substantially continuous tubular rein
forcing and joining member for said cartridges,
the improvement comprising a. chipboard thread 15
carried on the exterior of each of said cartridges,
and a. chipboard thread receiving recess formed
in the interior of each of saidsleeves, said car
cartridges, and a chipboard thread receiving re
cess formed in the interior of each of said sleeves,
one side of said threads and on at least one ad
jacent side of said recesses, said threads being
slidable into serrated engagement with said re
cesses in response to a force tending to longi
tudinally pull the cartridge from the sleeve,
whereby said cartridges are held in locked en
gagement with each other in said sleeves.
tridge threads being receivable in free-thread
able relationship with said recesses, lock-form 20
ing serrations formed on each side of said threads
and said recesses, said threads being slidable into
serrated engagement with said recesses in re
sponse to a force tending to longitudinally pull
the cartridge from the sleeve, whereby said car 25
tridges are held in locked engagement with each
other in said sleeves.
‘
~
3. In an explosive device comprising a, plurality
of explosive units, each unit including a car
tridge and a sleeve of substantially a common 30
length, the cartridges being held in propagating
LEWIS B. COUNTERMAN.
REFERENCES CITED
The following references are of record in the
?le of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS
Number
Name
Date
2,317,354
166,113
524,895
Bennett __________ __ Apr. 27, 1943
Kent _____________ __ July 27, 1875
Fulton ___________ _s Aug. 21, 1894
705,420
Minges et ai. ________ July 22, 1902
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