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Sept. 30, 1947.
\H. M. HERBENER
22,423,312
REFRIGERATOR
Filed May 1, 1943
a
7 Sheets-Sheet 1 7
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3mm
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Sept. 30, .1947.
H. M. HERBENER
2,428,312
REFRIGERATOR
Filed May 1, 1943
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‘ Sept.
30, 1947.
“REFRIGERATOR
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Filed May 1, 1943
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2,428,312
H M. HERBENER
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Sept. 30, 1947'
HLM, HERBENER
2,428,312
REFRIGERATOR
Filed May'l, 1943
'7 Sheets-Sheet 5
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Sept- 30, 1947-
H. M. HERBENER
2,428,312
REFRIGERATOR
Filed May 1, 1943
m8
7 Sheets-She'et 6
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’ Patented Sept. 30, 1947
f 2,428,312
UNITED _ fsTArEs _ PATENT
2,428,812
REFRIGERATOR -
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' Henry M. Herbener, Thomasvillc, Ga.
Application May 1, 1943, Serial No. 485,366
30 Claims.
(01." 62-95) _
My invention relates to refrigerators, such as
means ,for surrounding "the sub-freezing com-Y
are operated by a compressor, heat 'or the like.
partment, in whole‘ or in' part, with ‘chilled air. ,I
A further object, of the-invention is‘ to provide
a refrigerator of the above mentioned character,
An important object of the invention is to
provide refrigerating apparatus having the maxi
mum efficiency.
a
_
wherein a-proper' circulation’of the air is effected. " '
A further object of the invention is to provide
A further object of the“"invention is to provide
a refrigerator which may be operated intermit
tently, throughout the entire day, or operated
a downwardly tapered tank for holding theliquid'
during a portion of‘the day, when current or
freezable‘ medium with an ‘expansion jspace at I
the like is cheap or available, which produces ice, 10' its top and means for applying the freezing, action '
which is employed 'to properly chill the refriger- '
to the lower reduced portioniof the tank, thereby 7
ator, when the ice producing means is inactive.
increasing the e?iciency of the‘ apparatus.‘
A further object of the invention is to provide
A further object of the‘ invention is to ‘freeze.
means whereby the liquid freezable medium is
the liquid freezable medium within the tank from
- frozen in thin layers.
the bottom toward the top whereby the unfrozen
A further object of the invention is to ?rst
water at the top serves asa shield to prevent the.‘
freeze the liquid freezable medium at the bottom“ '
food products beingsubjected to a ‘sub-freezing;
and cause the freezing action to continueup
temperature. ~ '
wardly,'so that the resultant ice will not burst
the container or tank of the; liquid freezable 20
medium.
»
.-
_
'
A further object of the invention is to retain
the previously formed and partly melted ice when
floating, spaced from the freezing device or wall,
thus providing a layer of the liquid freezable
A further object’of the invention is to arrange‘,
the thermostatic elem’ent‘n at
of the water in the tank‘ so that
or the
near-“the
compressed‘;
level
will be stopped when the, water is completely
: frozen from the topto the bottom; "
A further ‘object of the inventionis’ to ‘provide ,
the wall or walls of the refrigerating casing with” >
' medium in direct contact with the freezing device
or'wall, for the next freezing cycle.
‘
liquid freezable medium holding tanks, whereby 1
, ice may be produced within: such tanks, to'retain . ~
A further object of the invention is ‘to provide
the interior'of thelre'frig'erating casing at ,a ‘suit---.'_ '
means to guide the ice producedin the tank ‘
able refrigerating temperature withoutdehydrat- -;
when the ice partly melts and ?oats, so that the
ing the edible foo *productsjand to prevent heat .
ice is retained centered with respect to the tank.v 30 exchange betweéiijt
' interior of the casing and’. 7
A further object of the invention is to guide "
‘the floating ice into thermal‘ contact with the '
heat transfer wall of the refrigerator casing‘ ~
while retaining the same spaced from the freezing
means or ‘wall.~
-
the
A further
exterior object
"thereof."
of the,_ vinvention
r,
. . is - to provide
v -
a tank so shapedt'that the top cross section is
35
A further object of the invention is to provide ‘
means for freezing a liquid freezable medium,
larger than"the=_-bottoi_n_crosssection to provide
extra room for floating ‘ice so that the top cannot
freeze overjbefo'e'the .bottom of the liquid. is
frozen;
'
'
'
’
'
‘
'
i
having a suitable volume'so that the ice produced I i
is ‘employed to retain the perishable products at
myThis
“co-pending
application:
application
is.‘ a'icontinuation
for. refrigeration‘
in, partapof;
a suitable refrigerating temperature, for a de .40
sired length‘ of time, without liability of‘ de: " paratus, ?led May'l, liléqfserial No.; 333,855. .
Iri'jhe accompanying drawings forming apart
hydrating them.
i A further object of the invention ‘is to‘provide ’
{ or this application and'in' which like numerals are
large number of thin ~15 employed to designate likef'pa'rts throughout the
liquid freezable‘ medium holding tanks, for pro-
g a' refrigerator having a
same,
‘
'
‘
'
'
Figure 1 isay‘c'entral vertical section through
the refrigerator, and permitting of the formation , " a refrigerator embodYiuB-m'y invention, '- *F'lgure 21s a transverse section taken on line '
of the ice quickly and'economically.
A further object of the invention is to provide,‘
~
g 2-2 of Figure 1,
a refrigerator having a separate compartment 50. Figure 3 is a/hori'zontal section ‘taken on‘ line '
8-3 of Figure, 1,
within its casing, which is heat insulated and’,
Figure 4 is a similar View taken on line 4-4 having means for producing, therein a subefreez
- of Figure 1, ’
ring temperature.
A further’obiect of the invention‘ is to provide 55
Figure 5 is a diagrammatic view showing the.
expansion coils and associated elements.
.
.
.
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/
‘i
2,428,812
[Figure 5‘ is a diagrammatic view of the motor
circuit,
4
25 and in- thermal contact therewith are ver
"tical heat exchange ice guide pins or devices 25.
These ‘guide pins are disposed at the central longi
.
Figure 6 is a transverse section through one of
the V-shaped tanks, showing‘ the water com
pletely frozen,
Figure 7 is a similar view showing the ice,
partlymelted and ?oating and guided from-the
walls of the tank,
Figure 8 is acsimilar view through‘one of the
tudinal axis of the tank, are arranged therein,
and are spaced longitudinally of the tank. The
guide pins 26' preferably have their upper ends
spaced from the plate 22 and preferablyter
minaterat about the elevation of the freezable
liquid medium-within the tanks. The tanks and
j-back wall tanks showingthe water completely 10 associated elements are formed of metal or other
frozen,
- suitable heat exchange material.
.
Figure 9 is a similar view. showing the ice partly
melted and-?oating and guidedéiromthe freezingv
wall and into thermal contact with the heat‘
transfer-wall,
-
Figure 10- is a central vertical section through
a modi?ed form of refrigerating apparatusem
vbodying my invention,
Figure 11 is a horizontal section-taken‘ on'line
‘ii-ll of Figure 10,
r
' -
_
Figure 12 is a central vertical section through a
further modi?cation of the invention,
'
‘
Figure 13 is a plan view of ‘the passages for
The freezing
of. the liquid medium within the tank is effected
by applying -a- freezing action to the bottom or
lower portion of the tank, and the freezing starts
at the bottom of the liquid freezable medium and
continues upwardly. This provides an expansion
space at the top of the resultant ice so that the
tank cannotabe bursted by the ice. After the _
freezing action is discontinued, which usually .
'20 'occursafter all of the liquid freezable medium
has been converted into ice, the resultant ice
within the tank serves to chill the interior of the
casing. Due to the heat exchange action of the
-
inclined walls’ of ‘the tank and the guide pins,
Figure 14 is a plan view of, the passages for
the ice will ?rst melt adjacent to the same. This
circulating the refrigerant, '
Y
circulating the chilled fluid,
-
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,
’
"Figure 15 isa central vertical section through
a further modi?ed form of the invention,
Figure 16 is a perspective view of the ‘refriger
ant circulating coil, and
~
,_
.
,
.the floating-ice is spaced from‘ the bottom, side,
30 and end walls of the, tank.
‘
Figure 17 is a plan ‘view of the chilled ?uid
circulating passage.
frees the ice from contact with the tank‘, so that
it may ?oat-or rise, and the guide pins serve to re
tain the floating ice centered in the tank so that
,
In the- drawings, wherein for the purpose of '
When the freezing
or‘chilling action is again applied to the lower
portion of the tank, with the remaining ice ?oat
ing in the tank, the ice will be out of the way
so that the liqud medium at the bottom and
illustration .is shown a preferred embodiment of
my invention, thenumeral ll designates a casing, 35 sides of the tank may be quickly and properly
frozen, since it will be in a thin layer and in
including sides ii, a back l2,1a front 13, a top
thermal contact with such bottom and sides.
ll ‘anda bottomv IS. The casing includes a lower
Surrounding the lower portions of the tanks 20
compartment, it for receiving the operating
are expansion elements _or coils 25', in thermal ~
mechanism, including a-compressor and motor,
if this‘type‘ of mechanism is employed, or a gas 40 contact with the lower portions of the sides and
ends of the tanks. Each coil extends from the
burning unit, or other heat operated unit, if the
bottom of the sides of the tank 20 and.-extencls
latter'type of mechanism isused. .The front I:
through about one half of the vertical dimen-i
has the usual .maln'entrance opening covered
by avhinged door i-‘l.
slon of such sides. Portions of the coils 25' are
_ 3
The top“ is double-walled, including an'inner 45 within recesses 25', occurring between the tanks.
Since the coils are adjacent to the lower half of
wall i8 and an outer wall ll’, formed of ‘metal
or
the
like;
I
a
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V
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the sides of the tank, the freezing occurs first at
the bottom of such sides, and quickly,‘ and coil
Arranged within this double-walled top ll is
tinues upwardly, and slows down upwardly. The
refrigerating means 18‘, adjacent to and in
thermal contact with the inneriwall fit. This re-v 50 refrigerating means i8. is arranged within the
double-walled top H, and is disposed between
frigeratingmeans is spaced from the outer wall
the outer wall it’ of the tank and a compartment
it’, and from the outer .wallslof the front and
A of the refrigerator casing,'and will prevent’ or
retard heat exchange from the compartment A
as shown; The refrigerating meansiv includes 55 to the outer wall [8' of the top, while serving
back [3 and i2, and is ‘surrounded by heat insulat
ing‘ material l9, arranged outwardly. of the same,
a plurality of horizontal tanks 20, . preferably ex
to chill the compartment A.
a
tending ‘transversely of the casing 10. These
The back'of the refrigerator is double-walled
tanks ‘are ‘hermetically sealed, are elongated,
and includes an outer wall 2"BL and an inner wall
and ‘taper downwardly and are generally V
21. The refrigerating means 28 is mounted
-shaped in. cross-section and ‘include ‘downwardly 60 within this double-walled back, and includes a"
vertical group of tanks 29. The wall 21 is com
converging sides 2i“. These tanks also ‘include
con to all the tanks’and constitute? the inner
downwardly converging ends H. The tanks 20
preferably have their tops arranged in thermal
vertical walls of the tanks. Each tank 29 fur
ther comprises an outer inclined wall 30, secured
contact and» their upper‘ ends may'belhermetically
to the wall 21 and to a top 31. Each tank is
sealedby acornrnon cover, 21. 'The_itanks 20
hermetically sealed and receives a liquid freez_
are separate and are ?lled-forthe maiorzportion
able medium,_such as water, brine or the like,
of theirheight with a ‘freezab‘le liquid medium,
partly ?lling the same, and leaving an air space
as indicated at 23. This liquid ‘medium maybe
33, for expansion, vupon freezing. The several
water, brine, or‘other liquid having a freezing
point ‘below water. Theitanks'llo are not com 70 tanks arein thermal contact with each other and
in thermal contact with the inner wall 21, form
pletely ?lled with thevfreezable'gliquid medium, as
ing a part thereof,but are spaced from the outer
a permanent air space 24 is provided in each tank,
wall 21", and heat insulating material “is ar
which ‘permits of the expansion of the liquid
ranged between the tanks 28 and the wall 21“, as
medium, upon freezing. ,Each tank 20 preferably
has anarrow bottom“. ‘ Secured to each bottom 75 shown. Arranged within each tank are heat ex
~
mam
change ice guide pins. 35, in thermal contact
with the side 30, and'spacedfrom the top 3|.
and side 2], and extending, approximately. to; the
level of the. liquid freezable medium therein; ‘If
desired, the pins 35. may be in thermal contact
with the side 21,. or‘ top 3l-, or both.- The. guide
pins 35 are spaced longitudinallyrof the tanks,‘
are disposed in transverse vertical planes, and
are inclined toward the wall 21. The guide pins‘
35 correspond to the guide pins 26, and serve to
guide the ice as it melts’, ,so-thatlthe ice moves
from the wall 30 and into thermal contact‘with
the ‘wall 21. The expansion elements or coils 33
are arranged in thermal contact with the; lower
half of the sides 3ll'of tanks 29.
,
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-'
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'
” ablasket sli‘fim
v
.Arranged beneath the compartment A is a
'l
‘I
double-walled shelf 31, supported ,by- ‘the back“
of the casing and spaced from- the sides and‘
front, as shown. This double-walled shelf,‘ in:
?ight“? time i;
cludes a lower diagonal sheet 33 and an upper
horizontal sheet or cover'33. ‘This double-walled
shelf receives and holds; tanks 40, 4| ‘and 42,
similar and corresponding to the tanks I33," but‘ >
differing slightly in shape in transverse section,
so that they may be accommodated ‘within the
double-walled shelf 31. The tanks 40, “and 42
j have their bottoms spaced from the diagonal
sheet 38 while theirtops are 'in thermal contact
with the cover 33. Heat insulating material 43
is arranged withinthe double-walled bracket 31 80
as,
the‘liquidl ‘TH
‘ .ihgfto-the-llina 26.2
fcrthe'
ice guiding‘phi's
same'nii 5'“ Se;c."a
mint‘ 5.5.! are hither?
mal contact Win? the. b9 ms‘ "of 121121541113 5,5‘; ‘
which bottom rein th ‘mar contactiwith the
inner wall 51! Expan Wye ments'or' coils- L
.
v
.
r
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corre'spondihgto‘the
-
'
nsi
25?’, arepr '4‘
,_
are;, ‘in_ thermal-.- con;
.
andis disposed. between the tanks and'the in‘-- , ' tact‘ with the lowerh f or; the sides of‘ these '
clined sheet 33, as-show'n. The tanks 40, 4'! and
tanks. The tanks ‘seem sbac'ed'frqm the shelf
42 are hermetically sealed and the cover: 35 is
56', .and heatfinshlatmg matérlaligfis arranged‘
common to them. Each tank is separate but is
between these parts-ems I also extends. within
preferably in thermalcontact with the next tank
the'fronji and bottom the doubl
.
.,
,
allied
com‘
and receives a liquid freezable medium, such as‘, "Par-merit “A ‘erranséd'betwees e 'ehambéfs
, _ .
water, brine or the like, ‘partly ?lling the same,
49‘and 50ers tanks ‘in. Substantially; identical leaving an upper air space.v Each tank within
with the'tanks [sf-i,‘ scheming‘a'1iqu1erréezab1e
the double-walled bracket is provided‘ with an ' medium, such'as'brine or the like a?qiha'vmsair- -'
expansion element or coil“, in‘ thermal contact 40 spaces ‘in ‘.théir‘t'op's‘. 'The'expan'sionclern'ents or.‘
with the lower half of its sides, and these coils
coils ‘6|, correspond to the'elementsv?e', “ar “Lin
correspond to the expansion coils 25'." The ex
thermal contact with thelower‘halfof the‘s‘ides
pansion coils 44 have no thermal contact with
0f the tanks '50- iii‘r?llged within th¢l59ih1$§ 5°]
the inclined sheet 38 but‘ are spaced and in- . are vertical: heat-transfer‘ice guiding pins-‘e25
as,
‘vided for the tans ,S'. _
.,
.
,
I _
.
, v"sulated therefrom. The tanks 40,“ and 42'have’ 45
corresponding to .th'eT'pin‘s ‘23", andlhavin'g‘ the
spaced vertical heat transfer .ice' guiding pins '
same function. Thev pins 5: arein'thefm _ con-~
’ v 45, 46 and 41; respectively, disposed at the cen- .
~tral longitudinal axis of the tanks.’ These pins
’
tact with the top 33 of all? tanks and alsoYi'n
thermal contactfwith; ?bottoms'?o'f he ank'sf
have their upper ends secured to- and in thermal
At the back‘ of the ‘chamber 43 are 'tanks'ii,
contact with the cover ‘33, and their lower, ends 50 identical with the tanks‘ 29 and having expansionv
spaced from the bottoms of .the tanks. In con
' nection with the tanks 40, 4i and 42, thefreez- _'
cells 36, identical with ‘theiexpansioncoils' 3S;
and heat exchange ice. guide pins 3‘! identical
ing action is applied/to the‘ bottoms of the sides
with the pins 35-, ‘ The vtanks 85 are inYthermal‘
of the tanks, as explained in connection with the
preceding freezing action, and after the ice is
formed and the freezing action is stopped, the .
ice will melt, and the guide pins will retain the ice
centered in the tanks, so that it will properly
?oat-therein and remain spaced from the v‘side's
of the tank. It is thus seen that the refrigerat,-'
ing means within the double-walled top 14 will
chill the compartment A from the top while the
refrigerating means within the double-walled
bracket 31 will chill the compartment A‘ from
the bottom, both refrigerating means also serv
ing to chill the interior of the casing l0.
contact 'with‘the inner back wall-‘68 ‘of the‘ chain- ,' 7
her 49, which wallforms-a .part'of the tanks,' ' '
but the tanks are spaced ‘from the outer “wall '
ll‘;L and are'"insulated-therefrom,bythe ‘insulate
ing material 24; as shown.‘ ‘Both'sets of tanks '55
‘and?l'andtlletanks 65 will chillthe' chamber .
69 49; was fheta‘nks- 8'0 will els‘ovchill the Chimer
‘ cc. sinpg’thetanks'ss and 6,0 are employed to
65
'
The numeral 48 designates a heat-insulated
cold or sub-freezing chamber or compartment,
‘
which is mounted upon the back I: and spaced 4 '
from the sides andfront oi‘ the casing I0. This 70
compartment a?ords spaces or passages 48', upon
its opposite sides to'receive baskets 43' or the l
produce a sub-freezing temperaturethey' will‘hold a liquid. freezable medium such“ as brineorthe
like. ‘ The chamb'er’lillis heat‘ insulated from the
space
' ‘As shown
.574, as shown.
in Figure 5, ‘ the lower
a /‘ turns- 'Bll'1 of
the cells 61 are connected in series, and'the‘ intake
turn 6|? is connected in series with the lowermost ’
coil 33, connected with apipe‘?. The'outletturh '
6|“ is‘ connected in series with the intaketurn 32?
of the upper turns; _- These upper turns 32!,IL are
connected in series and the outlet‘ turn'?'lpis
connected with a pipe 63, connected‘ with the '
second coil 66 from the bottom. 4 The second and
food products to be retained at ordinary refrig 75 third coils 86 from the bottom are, connected in x
- like, removably mounted upon supports 50'.
These baskets are employed .to hold perishable
2,428,319
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series, and the third coil 68 fr‘ the bottom is
connected withthe intake
58* of the lower
.
8
_
_
'
third coils 88 from the bottom, the turns 58“ and >
the turns 59'. into which further expansion and
vaporization occurs. The resultant liquid and
gas then passes in succession‘through the first,
‘set of tu'rns?‘. vThe outlet tum_ 58! is connected
with the intake turn 59‘, of the upper set of turns
I3‘, and the outlet turn 59‘ is: connectedwith a
pipe 89,- connectedv'with the lowermost coil 38.
The'?rst, second, third,[fourth and ?fth coils ll‘
second, third, fourth and?fth coils 36 from the
bottom, in which further expansion and vaporiza
tion occur. The liquid and gas then pass through
the turns 44‘, the turns 44b and the sixth coil
i'romthe'bottoln are connected in series and the
?fth coil “from the bottom'is connected in
series with-the lowermost turni44' of the coil.“ 10. 38 from thebottom, wherein further expansion
and vaporization occur. The liquid and gas then
of-theitank 42. The uppermost or outlet coil 44‘.
. pass through the pipe 10‘, turn 44c and pipe ‘H
is‘connected ‘in series ‘with the lower
44b
of the coil 44)- of the tank“, and theuppermost
and the seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth coils 38
from the bottom, wherein further expansion and
turn“b is connected withia' pipe’ilé, connected
with‘, the sixth coil :6 fromthe bottom.‘ This coil 1;~
I6 is connected with the‘ turn 449 of the coil.“
of the tankjL?yThe, turn 44° is connectedwith
a rpipe:.ll,»‘connected‘with ‘the seventh coil”;
vaporization occur. The liquid and gas then pass
through the pipe 12, through the turns 25*‘, and
the turns 25,‘ and tO'the pipe 13‘, whereby further
vaporization and expansion occur. When the
vapor enters the pipe 13 the cycle of operation is
from the'bottorn. _ hef'sev'enth, eighth, ninth and I
The liquid trap 13' prevents any of
tenth cells 36 from the‘ bottom are 'vconnected up repeated.
the liquid returning to the compressor. It is thus
in series, and the uppermost coil It is connected;
seen that the liquid and vapor when passing
with‘ a pipeilhconne'cted with the intake turn
through
the several turns, coils, pipes, either
2i!‘ofa-lowersetpf turns “beef. the coils 25?...
The outlet'turn "25h 'lslzconnected with thejupperv
travel horizontally or upwardly, or the arrange
inlet L’turn >25" of anhpbci‘ set ofturns, and the a
outlet'tum' 25' is connected withha pipe 13, havingv
aliquid trapli'. -'T'he>pipe_,‘|3 is‘ connected with 1
the intake‘sideof a compressor14,the outlet side
of whichls ‘connected with apipe1l,'discharging ,_
ment may be'such that they will travel‘ upwardly
continuously.
While I have shown the refrigerant as supplied
from a unit including a compressor, the refrig
erant may also be supplied in the form of a gas,
from
aunit as is employed in the Electrolux re
into'a‘re'diator or'condenserlt. The pipe .11 con, 80 Ifrigerator.
and in which a flame or heat is used
nectswith the ‘discharge end ‘of the condenser and L
to produce the gaseous refrigerant.
isLconnected' with'the pipe‘ i1, and‘ 'a' restrictory
valve "is connected in the pipe '11. I .
-‘
The-compressor 14 is driven by. a motor 79.;
Since the vrefrigerating means for the chain
bers 49 and; 50- are within the heat insulated 00111-1
. partment, they do notmaterially chill the inte
This'motor is connected in a circuit including lead ‘ 85 rior, of the casing 10. This prevents the sub
wires-‘8e and l I‘: -A thermostatic switch 82 is con-J
freezing ‘temperature from occurring within the
.nected in'the wire‘ 8|; “A clock controlled switch
casing l0, exteriorly of the sub-freezing corn-f
83' is'connected in the wire ‘80' and this clock con-,
partment, so‘ that the food products within the
trolled switchmay be cutout-‘or into circuit by v ,casing,
are not dehydrated. The interior of the
a switch 84. A manually ‘operated switch 85 is v .40
casing
is
chilledprinclpally by the refrigerating
also connected in?-théfwire 80'.-;It‘ is thus seen. ' means including
the tanks I8,*,-tanks 29, tanks
thatv by ‘opening the. ‘switch’ 85.‘ and closing the
65 and tanks 40, ‘4| and 42, without liability of
switch in; that the non; commute switch will -; ' dehydratingv
the food products, as the refrigerat
then‘be'conn'ected in the'fwire all, '}This clock. ing mechanism
will be stopped at about the time
controlledswitch mayclosei'thegcircuit at the" 45 thatallv
of the water in these tanks is completely
clock»; intermittently, or continuously, during any ,,
frozen. The, combined volume, of the ice pro
selected -' portion cit-‘the 1 da ‘ , or throughout , the .1
duced is su?lcient to keep the interior of the case
entire‘ day. " ‘,When itjis :desired'not to employ a .
ing suitably > chilled for a considerable period,
time controlledmeans'to ClQSfe the c'ircuitat one;~ after
the compressor stops; The'chilled'air pro
point,‘ switch-841s opened, andthe circuit may be 7
50
manually‘closed by the switch 85.1 The titer-moi, ' ‘ duced at the topof the casing descends, while
the warmer air rises, thus producing suitable ciri ’
static switch a‘: closes the circuitt'at a second point.
As-more clearly shown'in'li‘igure ', '1, the ther-i ~
mostatic switch" 82 is‘ located between one, tank
culatlonwithin the casing, about the shelf and
compartment 48. The passages 48' provide suite,
ablespace for this ‘circulation,-
,
-
29 and, the tank 42.“ y'rl‘his'thermostaticpswitch; 65 In Figures 6 and 7,-Iv have illustrated the
is in thermal contact with either, orboth tanks,
method of freezing the water or other freezable
and is arranged at‘orvslightlyp above the maxi
liquid medium, in the V-shaped tanks. when
mum-water level of the ‘tank {or ,tanksh'T'I'h'e
the apparatus is started, the refrigerating mech
thermostatic switch remains'closed until thejtem- '
anism runs until all the water is completely
frozenin' the tank 20, Figures-6 and 7, to provide
temperature again rises above i32w°ininus at which; _ a cake of ice 20¢, contacting with the sides 2|",
ends 2|,.bottom 25,;and guide pins 26. When
time-it will close thecircuit}
u
p J
‘v
perature-applied thereto reaches 32°“min'us, at
which time‘it- will openand remain open‘ ‘until'the
to1
the water is thus substantially completely frozen '
The
‘I‘he‘operationis‘asfollows?-L
compressor 14 withdraws V;I“
the vaporized;
within this tank and within the other tanks, the
refrigerating mechanism is rendered idle by stop
ping the action of the compressor, and the
' refrigerant from the outlet turn 25¢ through the
pipe 1.3,‘ converts‘it into a ‘liquid and passes it .
thermal contact between the ice and these ad
intothe condenser or radiator 16." “Front thisfconé. ' . ‘ jacent
parts, causes the ice to melt adjacent to "
denser thelique?ed refrigerant passesthrough
the restrictor valve 18 and enters the pipe Bl. and
passes in *succession through the lowermost coil
~66 and the turns 6!‘, and throughxthe turns 62*,
in which expansion occurs and some of the liquid
is vaporized, The liquid refrigerant and vapor
then passes throughthepipe 88, the second and ‘
' r such parts, and the ice is partly melted.
io
This‘
frees the ice from the walls of the tank, and the‘
ice ?oats and rises. The ice also melts adjacent
to the guide pins. These guide pins new guide
the ice in its ?oating movement and retain the
ice- spaced from the sides and ends of the tank.
If the ice contacted with one side, capillary
2,428,812
action would cause the ice to adhere to such side
and slide up the same. The pins 26 thusiguide
. the ice from the sides 2Ib and the coils 25“. The,
matic operation may"occur
'10 during a selected part
of the day when current is cheap or available,
box.
way, the food products can be subjected to ‘the
maximum cooling temperatures, without liability
of being frozen or dehydrated.
operation is repeated.
.
.
'
>
'
.k
'
box is preferably rectangular, vertical and‘in
The cycle of 35 eludes an inner casing 86 and an outer'casing
The same action occurs ~
in all of the V-shaped tanks. Substantially the.
same action occurs in the back tanks 29 and 65,
except that the pins 6'! guide the ice into contact
81, forming a double-walled construction. The
double-walled construction holds heat insulating
material 88. Access is had to the interior of the
inner casing 86 at the top only, through an open
ing 89, to be closed by a removable cover 98‘.
with the inner heat exchange wall .21, and pro-‘- 4“ Surrounding the casing 86- are superposed hori
duce a layer of water 21“, between the wall 29
zontal sets of tanks 9 I, corresponding to the’ta‘nks
and the ice. When the refrigerating mechanism‘
29. The walls of the casing 86-‘1'orm theinner
is again rendered active, the layer of water 218
sides of these tanks. The tanks ,9I are there
is frozen, as explained.
. >
fore in thermal contact with the'casing 86. The.
In each instance, when the previously formed 45 tanks 9| are hermetically sealed, and are partly
ice partly melts within the tank, it is guided
?lled with a liquid freezable medium 92, such
from the freezing wall of the tank, so that a thin
as brine or the like. There ‘is an air space 83 at
layer of water is produced at such wall, and
the top of each tank. Each tank has an ice ‘guide
' ‘when the refrigerating mechanism again starts, -
‘pin 94, corresponding to the pin‘ 35, ‘and inclined
the wall will freeze the thin layer of water. In 50 upwardly toward the wall of the casing86. Sur
this manner, a thin layer of ‘water is succes
rounding the wall portions of each set of tanks '
sively frozen in each tank. »
is a. refrigerating coilv 95, including a lower turn‘
By providing a large number of thin tanks,
95“ and an upper turn 86“. The coil is in thermal
' the combined volume of the ice produced is su?i
contact with the outer sides of the tanks 9|, and
cient to properly chill the interior of the refrig- 55 does not extend above the lower half of the tanks.
erator casing. The arrangement also produces
Arranged beneath the bottom 96 ‘of‘the casing
a large number of thin water layers, which are 86 are tanks 91 corresponding to the tanks 28, and
frozen in succession, thus increasing the e?lciency
in thermal contact with the bottom 96. 98 are
of the apparatus. This avoids the necessity of
vertical ice guide pins. The tanks 91 are her
freezing through thick ice, except when ‘first 60 metically sealedand are partly ?lled with'brine
starting the refrigerator to completely freeze the , or the like, and have air spaces 9,9-at their tops.
water in the tanks.
'
A refrigerating coil I06 surrounds the lower por- .
The apparatus maybe operated without the
tion of each tank 91, in thermal contact there
thermostatic switch. In this event, the clock
with, and does notextend above the lower half of
switch would be disconnected from the circuit 65 the tank. Each coil I88 includes a lower turn
and the circuit opened and closed, at intervals
IIIIIa and an upper turn I88". The lower turns
by the switch 85. When it is desired to have the
I Ill!a .form a horizontal group and are all con
' operation‘ automatic, the thermostatic switch is
nected in’ series like the coils 6|‘, Figure 5, and
employed, while the switch 85 may be closed and v
1
and when this is desired the switch 85 is opened '
ice is allowed to partly melt, while thevrefrig
and the‘l'switch 8‘ closed. The thermostatic
erating mechanism remains inactive, until a. thin l switch vwill open and close the motor circuit, as
layer of water 28° surrounds the ?oatingice and
explained, and the‘ clock switch will close the
parts of the tank. This thin layer of water may
circuit at another point at the beginning of a
vary in thickness, but it is preferred that it
selected portion of the day and again open the
should be about one fourth of an inch in cross
circuit at the ‘end of such selected pbrtion.
section. The thinner the layer of ice'28°, the 10 " The food products upon the shelf 86 are in
quicker and more economically the freezing ac
~thermal contact therewith and therefore in
tion may be effected. A very thin layer freezes
thermal contact with the ice through the me
_ almost instantly. When the thin layer of water
dium of the tanks 48, ll and 42. The shelf 88
20a is provided, the compressor starts and the
may have a temperature of 32° plus but not a
freezing starts at the outer face of the layer 28° 15 temperature below this. There is therefore no
adjacent to its bottom edge. This freezing con
necessity to have the refrigerating mechanism
tinues inwardly, and slows down and becomes
} produce an exposed temperature below 32° plus,
'. more difficult as the thickness of the icebetween
as must be done with the ordinary mechanical
vthe wall 20b and the water increases. The freeze
refrigerator, wherein the explosed temperature
ing action is continued until the layer is com- 20 is always below 32° ‘during operation, for other
pletely frozen and then the compressor is stopped.
wise the compressor wouldnever operate when
The freezing action also starts at the bottom of
the coil is covered with frost. The frost is at
the layer and continues upwardly,‘ so that the
least 32°, but is not of sufficient volume) to prop
top layer is frozen last. This prevents the freez
erly chill the box and therefore the compressor
ing action from bursting the tank. When the 26 must continue to operate to properly chill the
layer of water ?nishes freezing at the top, it
loses its ability .to absorb the sub-freezing- tem
‘In connection with all parts of the refriger
peratures, and therefore the thermostatic switch
ator
where heat exchange is to be effected, such
is set to open at this time, to stop the compressor.
parts are to be formed of met-a1 or other suitable
The unfrozen water at the top serves as a shield 80 heat transfer material. ‘
r
’
and will absorb any sub-freezing temperatures
' ‘In Figures liland 11 I have shown asub-freez
until the water is completelyfrozen. In this
ing box for holding frozen food products. This
the upper turns IIIIIb form a horizontal group’ and ‘
the switch 84 opened. When the ice partly melts 70 are connected in series like the turns 62“.
in the tanks, the thermostatic switch will close
The lower intake turn ")03 is connected with a ‘
and the ‘compressor willbe driven, until the water
pipe IllI, having a restrictor valve I62 connected
in the tanks has again completely frozen, at , therein. The pipe IIII is connected with the out
which time the thermostatic switch will again
let end of a condenser ‘or radiator‘ I03, connected
open and the compressor will stop. This auto- 76 with a pipe I84. This'pipe is connected with the
' 2,428,312
.
'11
discharge-side of a compressorv I05, drivenby a
motor I06 or the like. .The outlet turn, I00“ is
connected withthe intake turn I00", and the
» outlet turn I00b is connected with the-lower-turn
05' of ‘the next coil 95.. The upper. turn 96'’ of
each coil is connected with the lower‘ turn- 95'
"ofithe coil above it. All of the coils 05 are there.
iore. connected in ‘series. . rll‘he upper turn 95“
of theuppermost coil95 is connected with a pipe
I0'I, having a liquid trap I 00 connected therein.
The pipe m is connected-with the intake ‘side of
‘ the compressor.
l2
.
I
' It is thus seen that the liquid refrigerant pass
_ ing'through the pipe IOI will ?rst pass through
V the lower group of turns I00;“,~then through the
_ upper group of turns I00”, and then through the
several coils 05Yin_succession.- Expansion ‘and
vaporization occur in‘ these coils. The-vapor is
returnedthrough the pipe I01 to the compressor.
-
In Figure 15, the same tanks-I09 are employed
and the same ltanks H3, except that the tanks
H3 correspond in number to the tanks I09 and
are arranged in alignment therewith. The same
ice guide pins are provided. The tanks I09 have
the same passages I I2 for the ?uid to be chilled,
such as brine, air, and the tanks II3 have the
passages H8 to receive the ?uid, such as brine or
air, and these passages are connected in the same
manner as described in connection with Figure
12. Coils I I1 surround the lower portions of
the tanks I09 in thermal contact therewith, and
receive the refrigerant from a unit including a
compressor. Corresponding coils II8 surround
the lower ends of the tanks H3, and in thermal
‘contact therewith. The coils-III are connected
in series with each other and'the coils II8 are
’ connected in series with each other and in series
with the coils I II. In this form of the invention,
Theliquid and gas thereforeitravel horizontally 20 when the water is completely frozen in the tanks,
the thermostat will stop the action of the com
and upwardly through .the ,various coils. The
- groups of turns may be inclined outwardly, and
pressor.
}
»
_
the coils 95 may be inclined upwardly, whereby
It is to be understood that the forms of my
the liquid and ‘gas will travel upwardly contin
invention herewith shown and described areto
juously when passing through the coils. The ap 25 be taken as preferred examples of the same and
paratus may be used with or without the ther. that various changes in the shape, size, and ar
rangement of parts may be resorted to without
mostatic switch or with or without the clock
switch. The operation of the apparatus is so
departing from the spirit of my invention or the
similar to that of the ?rst part of the invention
scope of the subjoined claims.
> that no further explanation is thought to be nec
Having thus described my invention, what I
essary, except to state that ice isformed in each
tank, allowed to partly melt‘and ?oat to provide
claim is:
the thin layer'of brine which isthen frozen.
transfer wall, a downwardly tapered liquid freez
.
p
1. In a refrigerator, a casing having a heat
able medium holding tank having a part thereof
In Figure 12, I have shown a further modi?ca-, '
tion‘of the invention." In this ?gure, the numeral .35 .in thermal contact with the wall, said tank hav
100 designates an insulating casing, in the lower
portion of which are mounted tanks I09, corre
- spending to the: tanks '20 and having ice guide
ing opposed downwardly converging walls, up
standing ice guide pins for the tank and disposed
withinv the tank and arranged between the down
wardly converging walls, a refrigerating‘ element
I09 are hermetically sealed and partly ?lled with 40 arranged adjacent to the tank, and means to re
tain the ice between the downwardly converging
water, with air spaces at'the tops ‘of the tanks.
vwalls.
Means are provided ‘to form passages III, sur
2. In a refrigerator, a casing having a heat
rounding the lower portion of the tanks I09, and
transfer wall, a plurality of downwardly taper
in thermal contact therewith to receive a gas
pins I I0, corresponding to the pins 26. The tanks
eous refrigerant from a unit such as is used by 45 ing tanks having their bottoms in thermal con
tact with the wall and adapted for holding a
the Electrolux." These several passages which
liquid 'freezable medium, each tank having op
surround the tanks_I09 arejconnected in series. >
Y'posed downwardly converging sldes, substantially
Means are provided to form passages H2, sur
rounding the upper portions of the tanks I09, and > vertical guide pins arranged within the tanks
between the downwardly converging sides, re
in thermal contact, therewith.‘ These'passages
frigerating means disposed adjacent to the bot
H2 may ‘also be connected in series and serve to
toms of the tanks, and means to retain the ice
hold a ?uid which will freeze at a lower freezing
between the downwardly converging sides of each‘
"point than water, such as brine, air or the like.
Arranged above the tanks I09 are corresponding ' tank.
tanks I I3, for receiving water and having the air 55 3. In a refrigerator, a downwardly tapering
tank for holding a liquid freezable medium, said
spaces‘ at their .tops and‘ice guide pin H4.
Means are provided, for aiiording passages H5
tank including opposed downwardly converging
at the lower portions of the tanks H3, and in
sides, a refrigerating element disposed exteriorly
of the tank adjacent to its bottom and not ex
60 tending upwardly for substantially 'more than
one half of the height of the tank, and substan
tially vertical ice guide means within the tank
and arranged between the downwardly converg
ing sides and in thermal contact with the tank,
65 and means to retain the ice between thedown
thermal contact therewith, to receive a gaseous
‘refrigerant from a unit like the Electrolux. The
passages II 5 are connected in series and the
passages I I5 are also connected in series with the
passages III. Means are provided to a?ord pas
,sages IIB surrounding the upper portions of the
tanks H3, and in thermal contact therewith, to
receive a ?uid medium, which will freeze at a
wardly converging sides.
4. In a‘refrigerator, a casing including a double
lower freezing" point than water,v such as brine,
wall top having an inner heat transienwall, liquid
air or thelikeg“ The passages I_I6 arelconnectecl
freezable medium holding tanks disposed within
lin serieswith each other and in series with the
passages H2. The ?uid ?rst passes through the 70 the double wall top and in thermal contact with
the inner heat transfer wall, refrigerating means
passages H2 and then through the passages H6
arranged within the double wall top exteriorly
and then to'the cooling coil, of an air condition
of the tanks and adjacent to their bottoms, ice
ing unit refrigerator or the like; When the water
guide‘means arranged within each tank, a double
is completely frozen in the tanks I09 and. I13 a;
wall shelf arranged within the casing beneath
‘thermostat will turn off the flame or heat,
‘
12,428,312
:14
and spaced from'said top, said double-wall‘- shelf
'5 - sulated compartmentg'j and {refrigerating means
‘ including an upperheat'transferwallyaiplurality
’forthelast’namedbtanks;
of liquid freezable medium holding tanks ar
ranged within'the double ‘wall shelf and inther
mal contact with the upper wall, refrigerating-1
means arranged within the double wall shelf and
I Ya‘ liquid freezable-mediumdisposedadjac'ent to
1~ the-top of the casing; refrigerating'means for the
tanks, a shelf arranged withinthe casing beneath
disposed adjacent to the bottoms ‘of- thef‘l‘ast
named tanks, and ice guide means arranged with
in 5.the
In alast
refrigerator,
named tanks;
a double wall casing,
~
‘ tanks
t3:
'
v f 9:1In‘1a refrigeratorpacasing, tanks for holding
~> ‘and spaced-1 fromithel topandf spaced ~ from the I
’ sides: oflthe-"casinggtanks forrvholdingi-a liquid
freezable medium arranged in" thermal contact
10 ,.
arranged within the double wall for holding a
liquid freezable medium, refrigerating meansfor
the tanks and arranged within the aoumegwau
casing, a double wall shelf arranged within? the
with "theishelf, Frefrig'erating means for‘ the ‘last
named tanks-,1? a" ; heat 7' insulated compartment
‘1 within - the lowerifportioni "ofv the :‘c'a'sing beneath
lithe shelf and» spaced ‘from the'l-shelfa'ndl from:
‘the-bottornf'of thecasingto' provide Iabott'om pas
casing and providing a passage for the cir‘Cula-L 115 sage ‘and “from: the'sides- of,l the/‘casing ‘to provide
tion of air within the casing, said shelf having an
side passages, tanks for holding a liquid freez
upper heat conducting wall, tanks arranged with
~ able Pinediur'n" arranged within the heat vinsulated
in the double wall shelf for holding a liquid
compartment, a receptaclel‘removably inserted-in
freezable medium, refrigerating means within
the bottom passage, and ‘receptacles ‘ removably
the double wall shelf and disposed-adjacent to 20
inserted
10. In within
a. refrigerator,
the side apassages;v
casing, a, double‘w'all
[email protected] '
the last named tanks, a heat insulated compart-,
shelf'arranged'within the casing and having an
ment mounted within the casing and providing
a passage for the circulation of "air within the
upper heat transfer wall and formingwith the
casing, said compartment including a cold cham
casing an air circulating passage, tanks for hold
ber and an ice cube chamber, a plurality of tanks
for holding a liquid freezable medium disposed
within the heat insulated compartment at the
top of the cold chamber, refrigerating means for
‘ing a liquid freezable medium arranged within ‘
the double wall shelf and in thermal contact
with the upper transfer wall, expansion elements
arranged within the double wall shelf adjacent
to the tanks, and heat insulating means forthe
the last named tanks, a plurality of tanks for
holding a liquid freezable medium arranged with 80 tanks arranged beneath the same.
in the heat insulated compartment and disposed
between the cold compartment and the ice cube
compartment, and refrigerating means for the
last named tanks.
'
6. In a, refrigerator, a heat insulated compart
.ment having a cold chamber and an ice cube -
chamber, a plurality'of tanks for holding a‘liquid.
' -;
1
11. In a refrigerator, a casing having a double
wall top including an inner heat transfer wall
and a double wall back having an inner j‘heat
transfer wall, tanks for holding a liquid freezable
medium mounted within the double wall top "and
in thermal contact with the inner heat trans
fer wall, expansion coils within the double'fwall
top and disposed adjacent to the tanks, ‘tanks
for holding a‘ liquid freezable medium and~'ar—
with the wall of the cold chamber, refrigerating 40 ranged within‘ the double wall back and in‘ ther
freezable medium arranged within the heat in
sulated compartment and in thermal contact
means for the tanks and disposed adjacent to
their bottoms, ice guide means arranged-within
each tank, a plurality of tanks for holding a liq
uid freezable medium and arranged within the
heat insulated compartment and disposed be 45
tween the wall of the cold chamber and the wall
' of the ice cube chamber and in thermal contact
therewith, refrigerating means for the last named
‘tanks, and ice guide means within each of the _
last named tanks,
'
7. In a refrigerator, a casing including a double
wall top having an inner heat transfer wall’ and
a double wall back having‘ an inner heat trans
fer wall, tanks for holding a liquid freezable me
dium in thermal contact with the top heat trans 55
fer wall, refrigerating means for the tanks,'tanks
for holding a liquid freezable medium in thermal -
contact with the back heat transfer wall,‘ refrig
erating means for the last named‘tanks, a heat
mal- contact with the heat transfer'backwall,
expansion coils for the last named tanks, a double
wall shelf including an upper heat transfer wall,
tanks for holding a liquid freezable'medi'umfand
mounted within the double wallshelf" and {in
thermal contact with the heat?'tran'sfer'"shelf
wall, expansion coils for the last ‘named ‘tanks
: arranged within the double wall shelf, a‘heat in
sulated compartment within’ the‘ casing1 includ
ing a cold chamber and an ice‘ cube chamber, ‘the
cold chamber having heat transfer opposed walls
and the ice cube chamber having a'heat'trans
fer wall, tanks for'holding a liquid'freezable me
dium and arranged‘withi’n ‘the heat insulated
compartment and in thermal contact'with, the '
cold chamber wall, expansion 'coils1for the'jlast
named tanks, tanks for holding a liquid freezable
medium disposed between the wall or the-"cold
chamber and the wall'o‘f thev ‘ice'cube‘chamb‘er
and in thermal contact’therewith, ande‘xpa‘n'sion‘
insulated compartment arranged within the eas 60
ing and forming an air circulating passage with
‘ coils for the last named'tanks'.
'
"
the casing, tanks for holding a liquid freezable
-12. In a refrigeratonfa casing having afcham
'medium and arranged within the heat vinsulated
ber including a heat ‘exchange;walljfmeansiar-'
compartment, and refrigerating means for the
ranged uponv the outerf'side-of the heat ‘exchange
last named tanks.
'
8. In a, refrigerator, a casing, tanks for holding
a liquid freezable medium disposed adjacent to' '
wall‘ to form a tank ‘and iricluding'an ‘inclined
freezing wall ‘in thermal contact, with‘the‘ heat
exchange wall,‘th'e' 'tankiholding a liquid freezable
the top of the casing, refrigerating means for the
medium, inclined ‘means arranged within thetank
tanks, a shelf arranged within the casing next to
‘to guide the ?oating ice from'the inclined wall
the top, tanks for holding a liquid freezable meg 10 and into contact with v the‘ heat ' exchange ' wall,
dium and in thermal ‘contact with the shelf, re
- and means‘ to"ap'plyja1 freezing actionto the‘ in
frigerating means for the last named tanks, a
clined
13. In
walla»
apparatus‘vfor
'' ~'
holding frozen'foods
,
{Y7
V or
heat insulated compartment within the casing
beneath the shelf, tanks for holding a liquid
the likeira Teasing closed {at 'itsside's‘and bottom
freezable medium arranged within the heat in-' '10 and open’at’its topja cover for closing‘ the open '
2,428,312
i' '
-15‘
16
top,v water holding tanks disposed. at different
and in thermal contact therewith and forming a
elevations at the side of the casing, water. holding
passage for holding a chilling ?uid.
. tanks disposed at the bottom of the casing, re
frigerating elements arranged adjacent to the
lower ends of the water holding tanlmand ice
guide means within the water, holding tanks.
14. In apparatus for holding frozen foods or
the like, a casing having-its side and bottom
'
.
20. In a refrigerator, a case having av food
compartment, a tank to chill the air within the
‘ food compartment, said tank having a chamber
cover for the opening, vertically tapered tanks
adjacent to the sides of the casing and arranged
in superposed relation, vertically tapered tanks
tapered in cross section and decreasing down
wardly toward its bottom, said chamber holding a
liquidfreezable medium, a refrigerating element
disposed adjacent to the bottom of the tank, ice
guide means within the downwardly tapered
chamber for guiding the ice when it ?oats, and
means to retain. the ice within the downwardly
arranged adjacent to the bottomof the casing,
tapered ~ chamber.
closed and. its top provided with an‘ opening, a
ice guide means within the tanks, and refrigerat
'
21. In a refrigerator, a case, refrigerating mech
ing elements arranged adjacent to the bottom "15 anism for the case including a tank having a
portions of the tank.
.
l
,
downwardly tapered chamber for holding a liquid
15. In apparatus for holding frozen foods or
’ freezable medium, upstanding'ice guide means
the like, a substantially vertical casing having
within the downwardly tapered chamber, and a
its side and bottom closed andihaving an opening
refrigerating element disposed exteriorly of and
in its top, a cover for the opening, vertically :20 adjacent to the tank, and means to retain the
tapered water holding tanks in thermal contact
ice within the downwardly tapered chamber.
' with the side of the casing, vertically inclined ice
guide pins arranged within the water holding
tanks and having theirqupper ends extending
22. In a refrigerator, a case, refrigerating
mechanism for the case including a plurality of
tanks-having downwardly tapered chambers for
towardthe sides of .the casing, and refrigerating 25 holding a liquid freezable medium, upstanding ice
guide pins disposed within the downwardly ta
elements adjacent to the lower portions of the
water holding tanks.v -
.
_
.16. In apparatus of the character described, a
pered chambers, refrigerating means disposed out
wardly of the tanks and adjacent thereto, and
plurality of vertically tapered water holding tanks,
T means to retain the ice within each downwardly
ice guide means within the tanks, means arranged 30'
tapered
23. In chamber.
a, refrigerator, ,3, case, refrigeratin
.
adjacent to the lower portions of the tanks for
mechanism for the case including'a plurality of
(forming passages for holding a refrigerant, and
means arranged adjacent to the upper portions
separate tanks arranged in close relation, each
of the tanks for forming a passage for holding a
tank having a downwardly tapered chamber to
chilling ?uid. I
>
a
hold a liquid freezable medium, substantially ver
tical ice guide pins ‘within the downwardly. ta
17. In apparatus of the character described, an
insulating casing-,a lower group of vertically ta
pered chambers, means to apply a freezing action
pered water holding tanks arranged. within-the.
‘to each chamber, and means to retain the ice
casing, ice guide .means'within' the tanks, an
‘within each downwardly tapered chamber.
upper group of vertically tapered water holding
24.v In a, refrigerator, a casing having a food
tanks arranged within the casing, ice guide means
within the upper group of tanks, means arranged
adjacentvtothe lower ends of all of the water
compartment, a downwardly tapered liquid freez
ing medium holding tank to chillthe vairgwithin
. the food compartment, said tank having opposed
holding tanks andv forming apassage for receiv
downwardly converging walls, an upstanding ice
ing a refrigerant, and means arranged adjacent 45 guide pin arranged within the tank between the
to the upper ends‘of all of said tanks for receiving
downwardly converging walls, a refrigerating ele
a chilling ?uid.
,
1
ment adjacent to the tank, and means to retain
_,
18. In apparatus of the character described, a
heat insulatingcasing, a lower horizontal group
a of vertical tapered tanks arranged within the eas
the ice between the downwardly converging walls.
25. In a refrigerator, a heat insulated case hav
50 ing a food compartment, substantially horizon
ing and forming spaces between them, means
surrounding the lower end portions of thetanks
tal long narrow downwardly tapering tanks for
holding a liquid freezable medium arranged with
and extending into the spaces between the tanks
in the heat, insulated case and exteriorly of the
for forming a passage for receiving a refrigerant,
food compartment for chilling the air within the
means arranged adjacentto the upper end por 55 food compartment, the combined volume of the
tion of the tanks and extending into the spaces
tanks being su?lciently ‘large to hold enough ice
between them for forming a passage for holding
to retain the food products refrigerated for a
a chilling fluid, an upper horizontal group of
substantial period, means for applying a freezing
water holding tanks arranged within the casing,
action to the lower reduced portion of each tank,
means arranged adjacent to the lower end por 60 a, heat insulated, compartment arranged within
tions of the upper tanks and extending'into the
the case, tanks for holding a liquid freezable me
spacesbetween them for forming a passage hav
dium arranged within the heat insulated com
ing communication with the ‘passage near the
partment, and refrigerating means for the last
lower end of the ?rst named‘tanks, means ar
named tanks.
‘
a
.
'
ranged adjacent to the upper ends of the upper 65
26. In a refrigerator, a heat insulated case hav
tanks and extending into the spaces for holding
ing a food compartment, substantially horizontal
- a chilling ?uid and havingcommunication with
the passage adjacent to the upper end of the first
. long narrow downwardly tapering tanks for hold
mg a liquid freezable medium arranged within
the heat insulated case and exteriorly of the
_ 19. In apparatus of the character described, an 70 food compartment for chilling the air within the
insulating casing, a group of vertically tapered
food compartment, at least some of the tanks
water holding tanks arranged within thecasing,
being arranged near the top of the food com
refrigeratingcoils in thermal contact with the
partment, a shelf arranged within the food com
lower ends of the tanks,- and means disposed in
, partment and spaced from the top of the food
_ thermal contact‘with the upper ends of the tanks
compartment, at least some of the tanks being
named tanks.
-
V
_ 2,428,312
17
18
arranged above the shelf, tanks arranged beneath
the shelf and in thermal contact therewith for
. zontal long narrow downwardly tapering tanks
for holding a liquid freezable medium arranged
holding a liquid freezable medium, refrigerating
within the heat insulated case exteriorly of the
means for the last named tanks, insulating means
covering the lower portions of the last named
tanks, a heat insulated compartment within the
food compartment for chilling the air within the _
food compartment, the tanks extending substan
tially throughout the horizontal dimension of the
food compartment, the tanks being arranged in
case, tanks for holding the liquid freezable me- ’
dium arranged within the heat insulated compart
ment, and refrigerating means for the last named
tanks.
_ close relation, the combined volume of the tanks
being su?lciently large to hold enough ice to retain
the products refrigerated for a substantial period,
and means for applying a freezing action to the
27. In a refrigerator, a heat insulated case hav
ing a food compartment, substantially horizontal
long narrow downwardly tapering tanks arranged
within the case exteriorly of the food compart
lower portion of each tank. '
30. In a refrigerator, a heat insulated case
having a food compartment, substantially hori
' ment for holding a liquid freezable medium to 15 zontal long narrow tanks within the case for
. chill the air in the food compartment, means
holding a liquid freezable medium to chill the air
within the food compartment, the tanks being
- for applying a freezing action to the reduced lower
portion of each tank, at least some of the tanks
arranged in close relation and substantially cover
ing at least a portion of one face of the compart
compartment,‘ a shelf arranged within the food 20 ment, and means to intermittently apply a freez
compartment and spaced from its top, substan
ing action to the lower portion of each tank for
tially horizontal long narrow downwardly taper
producing thin layers of ice and prolonging the
ing tanks arranged beneath the shelf in thermal . intervals between the freezing action su?lciently
contact therewith for holding a liquid freezable
to permit the thin layers to melt and free the
medium, means to apply a freezing action to the 25 ice from the inner face of the tank so that the
lower portions of the last named tanks, and heat
ice may float in the water in the tank.
insulating means covering the last named tanks
HENRY M. HERBENER.
being arranged adjacent to the top of the food
beneath the shelf.
.
28. In a refrigerator, a heat insulated case hav
ing a food compartment, a shelf arranged within 30
the food compartment and spaced from the top
of the food compartment, substantially horl
zontal long narrow downwardly tapering tanks
for holding a liquid freezable medium arranged
within the case exteriorly of the food compart
Number
35
ment for chilling the air within the food- com
partment, at least some of the tanks being ar
ranged above the shelf, means for applying a
freezing action to the lower portion of each tank,
substantially horizontal long narrow downwardly 40
tapering tanks arranged beneath the shelf in
_ substantial thermal contact therewith for holding
a liquid freezable medium, means for applying a
freezing action to the lower portion of each last
named tank, insulating means for covering the 45
lower portions of the last named tanks, a heat
insulated compartment within the case, substan
tially horizontal long narrow downwardly taper
ing tanks within the heat insulated compartment,
and means to apply a freezing action to the lower 60
portion of the last named tanks.
'
29. In a refrigerator, a heat insulated case
having a food compartment, substantially hori
REFERENCES CITED
The following references are of record in the
?le of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS
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529,341
1,719,818
1,728,696
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Church __________ __ Nov. 13,
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Pownall _________ __ Nov. 28,
Ballew __________ __ Mar. 5,
Voorhees ________ __ Apr. 23,
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1894
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Sticelber ________ __ Feb. 24, 1942
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Rees _____________ __ July 6, 1943
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Brace _____ _’______ Mar. 28, 1944
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