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Jan; 11, 1950 >
J. M. HUSH Em
2,494,160
VIBRATOR TYPE MOTOR
Filed May 14, 1948
5 Sheé’ns-Sheet 1
INVENTORS
‘
JAMES M. nusn
DAVID E. asucu
BY 0% a 7d,,“
ATTORNEYS
Jan. 17, 1950
J. M. HUSH ET AL
2,494,760
VIBRATOR TYPE MOTOR
Filed May 14, 1948
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
Jan. 17, 1950
2,494,760
J. M. HUSH ET AL
VIBRATOR TYPE MOTOR
Filed May 14, 1948
5 Sheets-Sheet 5
ENVENTORS
BY
JAMES M. HUSH
DAVID E. BENCH
Qwlmin 0% 9W
ATTORNEYS
Jan. 17, 1950
J. M. HUSH ETAL
2,494,760
VIBRATOR TYPE MOTOR
Filed May 14, 1948
5 Sheets-Sheet 4
mvzu-mns
muss M. Husu
own '5. asucu
BY
ATTORNEYS
Jan. 17, 1950
J. M. HUSH ETAL '
'
Filed May 14, 1948
2,494,760
VIBRATOR TYPE MOTOR
5 Sheets-Sheet 5
BY
mvau‘rons
JAMES mwusn
DAVID E.BENGH
‘7W eyxalm
ATTORNEYS
2,494,760
Patented Jan. 17, 1950
UNHTED ' STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,494,760
VIBRATOR TYPE MOTOR
James M. Hush and David- E. Bench, Dayton,
Ohio, assignors to Hansen Manuiacturing Com
pany, Princeton, Ind” a corporation of Indiana
\ Application May 14, 1948, Serial No. races
6 Claims. (on. 172-426)
2
This invention relates to electric motors, and
particularly to electric motors wherein the arma
ture moves in a gyratory path.
In connection with the conversion of alter
nating current power to rotary mechanical mo=
tion it is necessary, in order for the said motion
Figure 16 is a somewhat enlarged view show
ing the gear arrangement connecting the gyro.
tory armature of Figure 15 with the rotary output
shaft;
Figure 17 is a sectional View indicated by the
line l‘i-—l'i on Figure 19, and showing one form
which the motor of this invention can take;
to be useful, to at one time effect a radial reduc»
Figure 18 is a plan view looking down on top
tion in speed from the rate at which the ‘alter
of the motor of Figure 17 as indicated by the
noting current alternates and to deliver a sub“
stantial portion 012 the power absorbed from the iii line iii-—ld thereon and showing the resilient
electric lines to the rotating element.
The primary object of the present invention
is to provide an improved arrangement for ac~
complishing these purposes.
Still another object is the provision of an elec
support of the gyratory parts of the motor;
become more apparent upon reference to the
Figure 1, there is shown a magnetic frame 10
Figure 19 is a similar view taken on the line
rid-42i- of Figure l’? and showing the gyratory
parts of the motor and the magnetic field struc“
ture associated therewith;
Figure 2b is a view indicated by the line lib-2i]
tric motor wherein high bearing speeds are elimi
in Figure i7 and shows the gearing intercom
nated and thus long life of the running parts of
meeting the gyratory and rotary members of the
the motor enhanced.
A still further object is the provision of a simple
motor; and
‘arrangement for changing pulsating electric cur» 20 Figure 21 is an enlarged view showing the
gear tooth arrangement.
'
rent into rotary mechanical power.
Referring to the drawings, and particularly to
These and other objects and advantages will
following description taken in connection with
having the spaced poles l2 and M. It will be
the accompanying drawings in which:
25 apparent that the excitation of the magnetic
Figures 1, 2 and 3 are diagrammatic views
frame II! by pulsating or alternating magneto
showing di?erent manners of obtaining gyratory
motive force will set up a corresponding pulsat
or bodily rotary movement of a member by means
ing or alternating magnetomotive force between
‘of a pulsating or alternating magnetic ?eld;
the poles l2 and M. In the space between the
Figures 4, 5 and 6 are views 01'' a motor adapted 30 poles is a polarized armature H6. The purpose,
for utilizing one of the principles shown in Fig
of polarizing the armature is that it will have a
ures 1,2 and 3‘;
definite thrust thereon in one direction or the ‘
Figure 7 is a perspective view of another form
other depending on the direction of the magneto
of electric motor having a gyratory armature;
_ motive force between the poles l2 and it.
Figure 8 is a view indicated by the line 8-8
The armature it is resiliently supported by a
on Figure '2;
spring member it which extends diagonally rel
Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 7, but show»
ative to the principal magnetic axis between the
ing still another way 01.’ e?ecting gyratory move
poles i2 and it. This spring member is prefer
ment of the armature;
ably a flat strip and is stiff against de?ection
Figure 1G is a view similar to Figures 7 and 40 in the plane of its length but is relatively feeble
9, but showing a spring support for the gyratory
against de?ection in a plane transverse to its
armature similar to that shown in Figures 4, 5
length.
~ ,
and 6;
.
Figure 11 is a view similar to Figure 10, but
showing the use of shaded poles for causing
By arranging this spring at substantially 45
degrees to the aforementioned magnetic ‘axis,
Figure 12 is a small detail view showing the
resilient support for the armature and the motor
the armature it is caused to take a gyratory or
orbital movement upon excitation of the magnetic
?eld. This is duev to the fact that when vthe
of Figure 11;
armature is acted on to move toward one of the
gyratory movement of the armature;
,
Figures 13 and 14 show still other ways of 50 poles it takes a motion which is at an angle to
the said magnetic axis,
transmitting the vibrating motion of the arma
As oscillations or gyrations of the armature
ture into rotary motion and characterized by a
continue it tends to move in a gyratory path
rotating member carried by the armature;
Figure 15 shows another embodiment of the
so that the length of the armature de?nes a cone.
principles of this invention;
$5 The outer end. of the armature, that is the end.
2,494,780
.
3
4
remote from its connection with vthe spring it,
thus follows a circular path, but due to its con
nection with the spring there is no rotation of
the said armature.
'
Figure 2 shows a similar arrangement and
wherein similar parts bear similar numbers, but
the spring support for the armature it in Figure
2 comprises the still’ springs 20 which extend in
one direction at 45 degrees to the magnetic axis
between the poles l2 and i4 and the relatively
feeble springs 22 which support the stiff springs
and armature and extend at 90 degrees to the
stiff‘sprlngs.
Modi?cation of Figures 7 and 8
In Figures 7 and 8 there is shown still an
other means of producing gyratory or orbital
movement of an armature by a pulsating mag
netic ?eld. In Figure 7 there is the magnetic
structure 52 adapted for excitation by the coil
54. Between the poles II of the magnetic struc
ture there is the polarized armature 58. The
armature I8 vhas one end supported as at Bl
in a resilient rubber-like grommet member which
is shown in section in Figure 12. On the opposite
side of the magnetic structure from the resilient
As in the case of the arrangement shown in
support BI the armature carries a bumper block
Figure l the armature It will have a compound 15 62 which is adapted for engagement with the
movement which, when conditions become stable,
diagonally arranged bumpers 64 which are posi
will result in a gyratory movement of the said
tioned to engage the said bumper block near
armature.
the limits of its vibrating movement in each
Figure 3 shows still another arrangement and
direction.
'
it will be apparent that the armature IS in Figure
The action of the bumper block and the bump
20
3 is also acted on by sti? springs 24 and feeble
ers 64 is best seen in Figure 8. In Figure 8 it will
springs 26. It will also be apparent that the
be noted that each of the bumpers strikes and
armature It in Figure 3 will have a gyratory or
de?ects the bumper'block and, therefore, the
orbital motion after conditions determining its
armature in one direction so that the armature
path have become stable.
25 tends to take a gyratory or open orbital path as
Modi?cation of Figures 4 through 6
Figures 4, 5 and 6 show one practical applica
tion of .the means disclosed in Figures 1 through
3 for bringing about orbital motion ‘of an arma
mm by means of a pulsating or alternating mag
netic ?eld.
it is vibrated due to excitation of the magnetic
?eld structure 52,.
'
As will be seen hereinafter, there may be a
gear 66 mounted on the end of the armature
30 and which gear is utilized for the purpose of driv
ing a rotary member in response to the gyratory
or orbital movements of the armature of the
motor.
In Figures 4 through 6 there is a magnetic
frame 28 which is of magnetic material and which
Modi?cation of Figure 9
may, in fact. be magnetized. If the frame is not 35
In Figure 9 the arrangement shown is sub
magnetized then the coils 30, when supplied with
stantially identical with that shown in Figure 7
an alternating current, will produce an alternat
and, accordingly, similar parts are similarly
ing magnetic field between the poles 32. If the
numbered. In Figure 9, however, the bumper
frame is magnetized then an alternating current
block 62 and bumpers .4 have been eliminated
supplied to the coils 30 will produce a pulsating
and instead there is a C-shaped permanent mag
held between the poles.
net 68 arranged with the magnetic axis between
Mounted on the base 34 which supports the
its poles at an angle of substantially 45 degrees
magnetic frame there is a leaf spring member
to the magnetic axis of the poles 56, so that as
36 which extends at an angle of 45 degrees to
the armature vibrates due to excitation of the
the magnetic axis between the poles. Secured
?eld structure 52, the auxiliary armature ‘I0 is
to the spring 38 is an armature 38 which includes
acted on by the permanent magnet 88 toexert a
a magnetic part 40 having one pole at 42 disposed
lateral bias on the main armature.
directly between the poles 32, thus to be acted
It will be apparent that as the principal arma
on thereby, and a. second pole 44.
ture 58 moves upwardly the bias exerted by the
As in the case of the arrangement shown and 50 permanent magnet it will be rightwardly thereon
described in Figure 1, excitation of the magnetic
and that'as the principal armature moves down
wardly the bias exerted thereon by the perma~
tomotive force. will result in gyratory or orbital
nent magnet 88 is leftwardly. This results, as
movement of the armature 38. This is utilized
in the case of the previous modi?cation, in the
to produce rotary motion by rotatably mounting 55 description of a gyratory or orbital path by the
frame with an alternating or pulsating magne~
a rotor 46 in a position such that the pole 44
will sweep closely adjacent the periphery during
a part of the orbital movement of the armature
free end of the armature.
Modi?cation of Figure 10
Figure 10 shows an arrangement similar to
Since the pole 44 has one polarity the rotor 60 that illustrated in Figures 7 and 9 and, accord
Y ingly, the main magnetic frame and armature
46 is arranged to have spaced areas of the op
bear corresponding numbers. In Figure 10, how
posite polarity about its periphery. This is ac
ever, the resilient support for the armature is a
complished by toothing or serrating the periphery
diagonally arranged leaf spring 12 similar to that
of the rotor as indicated at 48 and polarizing the
illustrated in Figures 1 and 4 through 6. This
teeth or serrations so that the outermost parts
spring operates in the same manner as that de
thereof all have the same polarity and opposite
scribed in Figures 1 and 4 through 6 and'results
to that of the pole 44.
in causing the armature to take an orbital or
In operation, the device acts as a ratchet and
gvratory nath.
each time the pole 44 sweeps across the periphery 70
As in the case of the modi?cation of Figures 7
of- the rotor 46 it advances it one tooth. After
and 9, the armature carries a gear 66 at its free
all conditions contributing to rotational move
end. This gear 66 is disposed internally of an
ment of the rotor 46 have become stabilized, the
internal gear 14 and which internal gear is
output shaft 50 on which the rotor is formed
_ mounted on a bracket 1! carried by the shaft ‘ll.
will have uniform rotational movement.
15 As the armature of the motor describes its orbital
28.
'
2,494,700
path the limits of the said path are determined
by the engagement of the internal gear ‘I4 by the
gear ‘IS on the said armature.
*
Due to the fact that the gear 60 is ?xed on
6
In the case of the arrangement shown in Figure
13 the free end of the armature pivotally sup
ports a member 90 which is preferably statically
balanced but dynamically unbalanced relative to
its pivot axis. Because of the static balance the
member ‘98 will be driven in a rotary path when
the armature and cannot rotate, the said orbital
movement of the armature and gear will produce
rotary movement of the gear ‘I4. For the pur
the armature 86 commences it gyratory or orbital
pose of predetermining the exact speed of rota
movement. Also, due to the dynamic unbalance
tion of the gear ‘I4 it is preferably toothed and
of the member ‘98 it will bring about a larger
bears a predetermined ratio to the gear 68.
10 radius of movement at the free end of the arma
As an example, assuming that the coil 54 is
ture than otherwise would be had. This is utilized
energized by alternating current at a frequency
for producing rotary motion by mounting the
of 60 cycles per second, the armature 58 and
?ywheel or ring I00 about the armature and
gear 66 will gyrate, or make one complete rota
forming in the ring or ?ywheel the triangular
tion about their orbital path in V“) of a second. 15 aperture I02.
This gives 3,600 complete rotations about the
In operation, when the armature assumes an
orbital path in one minute.
orbital path of sufficient size that it reaches one
Assuming that the internal gear ‘I4 has 60
of the corners of the triangle cutout I02, the
teeth thereon and the gear 66 has 59 teeth
said ring or ?ywheel will commence to rotate
thereon, then the drive ratio between the gear 20 synchronously with the orbital travel of the ar
66 and the gear 14 will be 60 to 1. The shaft
‘I8 will thus be driven at 60 revolutions per min
ute. It will be evident that this speed is readily
mature. It will be apparent that the rate of rota
tion of the ring I00 is much higher than any of
the output shafts of the previously discussed
motors, being 3,600 revolutions per minute for
25 an excitation frequency of 60 cycles per second.
The arrangement illustrated in Figure 14 is
In Figure 11 there is an arrangement shown
similar to that shown in Figure 13 except that
wherein a magnetic ?eld structure 80 is arranged
pivotally mounted on the end of the armature
useful for driving clocks, timers, and the like.
Modification of Figure 11
so that its poles 82 are each divided into parts
96 is a bar I04 having a slot I06 into which ex
and on one part of each there is a shading coil 30 tends a pin I08 carried on the ?ywheel H0. The
84 which may consist of a single turn of rela
?ywheel H0 is mounted on the output shaft H2
tively heavy conductor. The magnetic ?eld
and rotates therewith. The outer end of the bar
structure 80 is adapted for excitation by a coil 86.
I04 carries a weight H4 and the effect of the
In the manner already well known in the elec
said weight is to bring about rotary movement of
tric motor art the shading coils 84 cause the
the bar I04 about its pivotal connection with
magnetic ?eld through the portion of the poles
the armature 96. After the motor has been en
which they enclose to lag behind the magnetic
ergized and has run for a short period of time,
?eld established in the parts of the poles which
the bar I04 will swing about the armature in syn
are not enclosed by the shading coils. This is
chronism with the orbital movement of the arma
utilized, according to this invention, for produc 40 ture and drive the member H0 at the same rate
ing gyratory or orbital movement of the arma
of speed. The member H0 and the output shaft
ture in the following manner:
II2 thus operate at 3,600 revolutions per minute
The armature, as before, is resiliently sup
for an energizing frequency of 60 cycles per sec
ported at 88 on a rubber-like grommet device
ond, as in the case of the modi?cation shown in.
such as is shown in Figure 12, and has a polar—
Figure 13.
ized port 90 notched between the unshaded parts 45
Modi?cation of Figures 15 and 16
In the arrangement shown in Figures 15 and
16, the magnetic frame is indicated at H6 and
shaded poles are arranged at an angle, say, 45
mounted between the poles thereof is the polar
degrees to the magnetic axis between the un 50 ized armature II8 which is supported by the leaf
shaded pole parts and thus, as the part 90 is vi
spring I20. The leaf spring is stiff against move
brated by the unshaded pole parts the said
ment of the armature in the direction indicated
shaded parts will exert a thrust on the polarized
by the arrow A, but is relatively feeble against
part 92 which has a component part transverse
55 de?ection of the armature in the direction into the direction of said vibration.
,dicated by the arrow B. As in the case of the
As in the case of the arrangements discussed
previous modi?cation, this results in orbital or
in connection with the foregoing modi?cations
gyratory movement of the armature when the
for producing gyratory or orbital movement of
?eld is energized.
the armature, the effect of the shaded and in
The output shaft of the motor is indicated at
clined pole parts in Figure 11 is to bring about 60
I 22 and mounted thereon is an internal gear I24
orbital movement of the armature. This orbi
which'surrounds an external gear I28 mounted
tal movement may be utilized to produce rotary
directly
on the armature II8. An enlarged view
movement as shown in Figure 10'.
‘
of the gearing arrangement is shown in Figure 16
65 wherein it will be evident that the orbital move
Modification of Figures 13 and 14
ment of the external gear I26 will result in rotary
In Figures 13 and 14 a somewhat different ar
movement of the gear I 24.
rangement is shown for producing rotary move
In the gearing arrangement shown the inter
of the poles 82. A second polarized part 92 of
the armature is positioned between the shaded
parts of the poles 82. The part 92 of the said
ment by means of a vibratory armature. In these
' na1 gear has 24 teeth while the external gear has
?gures the poles of the pulsating or alternating 70 22.
magnetic ?eld structure ‘are indicated at 94 and
the polarized armature therebetween is indicated
at 9B. This armature is caused to take an orbital
or gyratory path in any of the manners described
This results in a drive ratio therebetween
of 24 minus 22, divided by 24, or 1 to 12. For a
gyratory speed of the internal gear of 3,600 rev
olutions per minute the output shaft I22 will
thus be driven at a speed of 300 revolutions per
in connection with the foregoing ?gures.
minute.
7
2,404,760
Modi?cation of mares 17 through 19
In Figures 17 through 19 there is shown an ar
rangement embodying the principles of this in
vention and wherein the physical size of the
motor has been reduced to approximately the size
cations within this invention as may fall within
the scope of the appended claims.
We claim:
1. In an electric motor; a C-shaped magnetic
frame and a coil thereon to establish a pulsating
magnetomotive force between the poles of the
frame, a polarized armature having one pole
In these ?gures the armature is indicated at
thereof between the poles of said frame, soft
I30 and this is a polarized member having one
iron members adjacent the other pole of said
pole at I32 between the two poles of an electro 10
armature,
and resilient means supporting said
magnetic frame I34 and also having another pole
armature for movement thereof in its plane but
I36 between the soft iron members I38.
preventing rotational movement of the armature.
It will be noted that the ends of the armature
2. In an electric motor; a C-shaped magnetic
between the pole faces and the soft elements I36
frame and a coil thereon to establish a pulsating
are inclined at an angle to each other. As will
15 magnetomotive force between the poles of the
be seen hereinafter this is utilized for producing
frame, a polarized armature having one pole
gyratory or orbital motion of the said armature.
thereof between the poles of said frame, soft
The armature is suspended, by means of the
iron members adjacent the other pole of said
pins or bolts I40, from a spring system shown in
armature, and resilient means supporting said
Figure 18 and which consists of a ?rst pair of
armature for movement thereof in its plane but
leaf springs I42 which have one end connected 20 preventing rotational movement of the armature,
with the armature by the bolts I40 and their
the poles of said armature having surfaces in
other ends fastened to a yoke I44. The yoke
clined at an angle to each other, and the surfaces
I44, in turn, is supported by the leaf spring I46
of the poles of the magnetic frame and the sur
to the stationary frame of the motor indicated 25 faces of the said soft iron members being sub
at I48. It will be evident that the spring and
stantially parallel thereto.
yoke arrangement provides for freedom of move
3. In an electric motor; a bracket, a pair of
ment of the armature I 30 in two different di
leaf springs extending from said bracket, a yoke
rections.
between the free ends of said springs, other
To obtain the said orbital movement the elec
tromagnetic frame I34 is energized with alter 30 springs extending from said yoke at right angles
to the ?rst mentioned springs, an armature sup
nating current. Assuming that the instantane
ported on the free ends of said other springs
ous excitation of the magnetic frame is such that
and being polarized, electromagnetic means at
the pole I32 will be attracted upwardly toward
of a small clock motor.
the upper of the poles of the electromagnetic 35 one end of said armature for urging it at an
angle to both sets of leaf springs, and soft iron
frame, this attraction will be in the direction of
members adjacent the other end of the arma
the arrow indicated at I50 in Figure 19. The
ture and responsive to the aforementioned move
movement of the armature in this direction will
ment of said armature for urging it in a different
bring the pole I36 thereof closer to the soft iron
direction whereby the said armature takes a
member I38, so that another thrust, having the 40 gyratory or orbital path.
direction indicated by the arrow I52, will be ex
4. In an electric motor; a bracket, a pair of
erted on the armature. It will be apparent that
leaf springs extending from said bracket, a yoke
this will produce a compound movement of the
between the free ends of said springs, other
armature which, when duplicated in the opposite
springs extending from said yoke at right angles
direction and on the other half cycle of excita
to the ?rst mentioned springs, an armature sup
tion of the magnetic frame I34, will result in
ported on the free ends of said other springs
gyratory or orbital movement of the armature.
and being polarized, electromagnetic means at
The thrusts which obtain during the said other
one end of said armature for urging it at an
half cycle of excitation of the magnetic frame
angle to both sets of leaf springs, soft iron mem
I34 are indicated at I5Ila and I52a.
50 bers adjacent the other end of the armature
The armature I30 carries on its lower face
and responsive to the aforementioned movement
the gear I54 which meshes with the internal
of said armature for urging it in a different
gear I56 when the said armature is following its
direction whereby the said armature takes a
gyratory path. The said internal gear may be
gyratory or orbital path, and gearing carried by
connected by a gear train indicated at I58 with 55 said bracket and frame for converting the gym
tory motion of said armature into rotary motion
any suitable work member to be driven, such as a
of a drive member.
clockwork or timer mechanism.
5. In an electric motor; an armature resiliently
The preferred form of the gear teeth on the
supported for gyratory movement in its plane but
gears I54 and I 56 is better shown in Figures 20
and 21, wherein it will be noted that the said 60 prevented from rotary movement, there being
parts of said armature spaced in its plane of
gear teeth are more or less in the form of a sharp
different polarity, means for establishing pulsat
V, except that the teeth on each of the gears
ing magnetomotive force across one of the polar
are truncated as at I60. This truncation of the
gear teeth prevents interference between the tips 65 ized parts of said armature to set up vibratory
movement of the armature in one direction and
thereof and permits the armature I30 to gyrate
magnetic means adjacent the other polarized
in a relatively small path and still maintain the
part of the armature for setting up thrusts
effective driving relationship. It will be apparent
thereon lateral to said direction of vibration in
that the number of teeth on the gears is subject
response
to the said vibratory movement of said
to variation and that the particular gear ratio
70 armature, the adjacent faces of said magnetic
shown is only exemplary.
means and said armature being substantially
It will be understood that this invention is
parallel and inclined at an angle to the said
susceptible to modi?cation in order to adapt it
direction of vibratory movement of said armature.
to different usages and conditions and, accord
6. In an electric motor; an armature resiliently
ingly, it is desired to comprehend such modi?
u supported for gyratory movement in its own
OJOQTOO
9
plane but prevented from rotary movement.
of said armature adjacent the said faces of said
spaced parts of said armature in its plane being
of opposite polarity, electromagnetic means adja
being parallel thereto.
electromagnetic means and said magnetic means
JAMES M. HUSH.
cent one of said polarized parts for establishing
DAVID E. BENCH.
a pulsating magnetomotive force thereacross to
set up vibratory movement of said armature in
REFERENCES CITED
one direction, and magnetic means adjacent the
The following references are of record in the
other polarized part of the armature for setting
up thrusts thereon lateral to said direction of
file of this patent:
vibratory movement of said armature and in 10
UNITED STATES PATENTS
response to the said vibratory movement, the
Number
Name
Date
faces of said electromagnetic means and said
1,862,356
Warren ___________ __ June '1, 1932
magnetic means being inclined at an angle to
2,036,917
Favre-Bulle _______ _- Apr. 7, 1936
each other and to the said direction of vibra
Adams et al _______ __ Mar. 16, 1948
tory movement of said armature, and the faces 16 2,437,904
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