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PROCEEDINGS OF T H E AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
OF ANATOMISTS
1943
In deference to the desire to restrict civilian travel, the
Executive Committee regretfully voted to postpone the Fiftyninth Meeting of the Association, which had been scheduled
to be held in Montreal on April 21, 22 and 23, 1943, at the
invitation of McGill University. It was decided, however, to
proceed with all feasible Association activities -to publish
abstracts of papers ; to receive nominations for membership ;
to authorize the holding of “informal Sectional Meetings, ”
“limited to local inhabitants so that travel and load on hotel
accommodations will not be increased”; and to publish the
annual Proceedings, “which may include brief reports of
Sectional Meetings. ”
On February third there occurred a serious blow to the
Association in the death of our President, Edgar Allen. The
Secretary-Treasurer, Dr. Swett, turned at once to the First
Vice-president, J. Parsons Schaeffer, who carried on as Acting President. Scarcely had this arrangement been completed, when, on February tenth, the Association suffered a
second devastating blow in the death of our Secretary-Treasurer, Dr. Francis H. Swett. With no provision in the Constitution covering such an emergency, but relying upon Article
111, which states: “The management of the affairs of the
Association shall be delegated to an Executive Committee, ”
Dr. Schaeffer requested the Nominating Committee to propose
631
632
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION O F ANATOMISTS
a substitute ad interim - to serve until the next meeting of
the Association. The Committee proposed the name of Dr.
Eliot R. Clark, who had been Dr. Swett’s immediate predecessor in the office. By mail vote the Executive Committee
endorsed the selection of the Nominating Committee, and on
March 5,1943 Dr. Clark became Acting Secretary-Treasurer.
Fortunately, before his death, Dr. Swett had received, censored
and sent to The Wistar Institute for printing, titles and abstracts for the Abstract number of The Anatomical Record.
He had also received, and investigated the credentials of,
nominees for membership. With his striking originality, high
standards and common sense he had started his term as
Secretary-Treasurer of the Association in such a manner that
it is clear that the Association has suffered a substantial loss.
He would have injected new life into it, especially while working in conjunction with our able and greatly lamented President, Edgar Allen.
Term of ofice during the ‘‘interim.” The Nominating Committee consisting of H. Cummins, Chairman, IC. E. Mason and
W. F. Windle submitted, for members of the Executive Committee for 4 years, Prof. William Bloom and William TV
Gruelich. The Executive Committee voted that “these names
will be presented whenever the next annual meeting may be
held -the time between the 1942 meeting and that date being
considered an interim period, counting as one year, with
respect to tenure of officers and members of the Executive
Committee.” This ruling is interpreted by the Acting Secretary as applying also to elected representatives, except the
representative to the National Research Council (see later).
On March 17, 1943 the Acting Secretary-Treasurer sent a
report to the members of the Executive Committee, with a
request for a mail vote on eleven items. The matters presented
were as follows:
633
PROCEEDINGS
1. (a) Financial statement for the year 1942
Balance on hand in checking account Dee. 31, 1941
(last audit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special savings account of former Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . .
Bank balance received from former Treasurer . . . . . . . .
Receipts from dues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
One dues item entered twice in cash book because first
check was returned by bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$1,608.45
712.24
804.23
1,334.13
2.00
... . . . . . . ... .... . . . . . . .
Total credits
Expenditures
Miscellaneous postage, supplies, printing, programs 58th
meeting, addressograph changes, etc. . . . . . . . . . , . . . .
Travel expenses - Secretary
. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . .
Local Committee 58th meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wistar Institute
Abstracts and postage ~.. . . . . . . . _ . . . .. . . . , . . . ..
Proceedings and postage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dues check returned for signature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seeman Printery Inc.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .
Statements and Stationery
Series F. War Bond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .
Transfer of balance of new Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..
.
..
Total expenditures
.
.
$4,461.05
$250.60
13.95
250.00
435.72
162.24
2.00
75.25
740.00
804.23
.. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .
$2,733.99
$1,727.06
Assets
Cash on hand Citizens National Bank, Durham, N. C.
Dee. 31, 1942 ..................................
War Bond Defense Series F. ........................
Total assets
. . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . ..
$1,727.06
740.00
$2,467.06
1. (b) Report of appointment by Acting President J. P.
Schaeffer of an Auditing Committee consisting of W. H. F.
Addison, Chairman, and E. J. Farris, who on March 15, 1943
submitted the following report:
March 15, 1943
We have examined the accounts of the American Association of Anatomists fob
the year 1942 and report as follows:
The records show the assets of the Association to be divided into two categories,
“checking” account and “savings” account.
634
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION O F ANATOMISTS
Checking Acrount
January I, 1942-May 5, 1942, E. R. Clark, Treasurer: Receipted bills, checks
drawn, and deposit slips agree with hank statements. The balance in bank May 5
was $804.23. This balance mas transferred by Cashier’s check of First National
Bank of Philadelphia (on a “countek” check recorded as no. 80) t o Francis R.
Swett, Durham, N. C.
This amount is recorded as deposited in the Citizens National Bank of Durham,
N. C., May 9, 1942.
May 5, 1942-December 31, 1942, Francis H. Swett, Treasurer: Receipted bills,
checks drawn, and deposit slips agree with bank statements. The balance in bank
December 31 was $1,727.06.
Savings Account
From January 1 to May 4, 1942, this account was i n the Morris Plan Bank of
Philadelphia. The bank book shows an increase from $703.45, by addition of
interest of $8.79, t o $712.24. On May 4 the account was closed and the balance of
$712.24 transferred to F. 11. Swett and deposited by him in the checking account
on May 9, 1942. On May 26 Dr. Swett purchased a War Defense Bond, Series F,
M 226397 F $740.00, registered in the name of the American Association of
Anatomists. Thus the savings account increased during the year by $36.55, of
which interest accounted for $8.79, while the remainder, $27.76, represented funds
transferred from the checking account. The bond is now in Dr. Clark’s care,
deposited in a safe-deposit box a t the First National Bank, Centennial Branch,
32nd and Market Sts., Phila., Pa.
We have further, a t the request of Dr. E. R. Clark, examined the accounts from
January 1, 1943 to March 1, 1943, and find receipted bills, deposits and bank
statements in agreement, with a balance, on March 1, 1943, of $1,747.28 in the
Association account in the Citizens Xational Bank, Durham, N. C.
Signed :
W. H. F. ADDISON
E. J. FARRIS
2. Report that President Allen appointed E. de Robertis of
Buenos Aires to represent the‘ Association at the Conferencia
Nacional de Anatomia normal y Patologia, in Cordoba (October, 1942) -that an acknowledgment of the appointment but
no report had been received.
3. Report that requests for remission of dues had been
received by five members, with recommendation that they be
granted.
4. Resignation of two members, R. D. Baker and R. S. Stone.
5. Report, and recommendation, of suggestion that dues be
remitted to members of the Association in the armed services.
PROCEEDINGS
635
6. Suqgestion that for 1943 dues be set at $1.50, with the
explanation that annual expenses with meeting total about
$1200; without meeting, between $800 and $900; and that
present paying membership is about 683.
7. Report of requests for reinstatement to membership,
upon payment of back dues, by R. L. Carpenter and J. B.
Goldsmith.
8. Report of the very great loss suffered by the Association
since the last meeting through the death of seven members,
with request for authorization to print in the Proceedings
memorials to all seven, written by committees appointed by
Acting President Schaeffer. The memoirs will be found at
the beginning of these Proceedings ; the names are as follows :
EDGAR
ALLEN,born May 2, 1892, died February 3, 1943.
Elected to membership in 1921. Professor of Anatomy, Yale
University. Vice-president, 1930 to 1932 ; President, 1942-.
GEORGE
CRILE,born November 11, 1864, died January 7,
1943. Elected to membership in 1910. Formerly Professor of
Surgery, Western Reserve University.
FRANKLIN
P. JOHNSON, born January 7, 1888, died February 12, 1943. Associate Clinical Professor of XJrology, University of Oregon ;formerly Professor of Anatomy, University
of Missouri.
HENRY
F. NACHTRIEB,
born March 11, 1857, died July 17,
1943. Professor Emeritus, Animal Biology, University of
Minnesota.
HENRY
ERDMANN
RADASCH,
born May 7, 1874, died November 29, 1942. Professor Emeritus of Histology and Embryology, Jefferson Medical College.
STEPHEN
W. RANSON,
born August 28,1880, died August 30,
1942. Professor and Director, Neurological Institute, Northwestern University Medical School. Member of Executive
Committee, 1921-1924 ; Vice-president, 1926-1928 ; President,
1938-1940.
FRANCIS
HUNTINGTON
SWETT,
born November 13, 1893, died
February 10, 1943. Professor of Anatomy, Duke University
School of Medicine. Secretary-Treasurer, 1942-.
636
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ANATOMISTS
9. Report that since E. R. Clark had served as representative to the National Research Council for 3 years, and since
the Council places 3 years as the limit of service for any individual, Dr. George L. Streeter be appointed to this position
for a 3-year term.
10. Report that two Sectional Meetings, as authorized by the
Executive Committee, had been held -in Chicago and Philadelphia (full report elsewhere) and suggestion that the Secretary frame a statement regarding regulations for such future
meetings .
11. Report on nominees for membership. The names of
twenty nominees were sent to the members of the Executive
Committee. Three were questioned and they, together with
ten questioned by Dr. Swett, were held in abeyance until the
next meeting of the Executive Committee, when their qualifications can be discussed. Seventeen were endorsed by the
Committee. As stated in the announcement concerning the
annual meeting, ‘ ‘they will be considered as Provisional Members until the next meeting, before which time they cannot
be voted upon in accordance with Article V, Section 1 of the
Constitution of the Association.” The names of the new
Provisional Members are as follows, the names in parentheses
being those of the sponsors:
ALDEN,ROLAND
H., B.A., PhD., Instructok in Anatomy, University of Tennessee,
Memphis, Tsnn. (K. B. Corbin, J. S . Nicholas.)
BAKER,BURTONLOWELL,
M.S., Ph.D., Instructor in Anatomy, Vniversity of
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. (P. E. Smith, B. M. Patten.)
BARDEN,
ROBERT
BRADSHAW,
A.B., Ph.D., Instructor in Zoology, Cornell University,
Ithaca, N . P. (H. B. Adelmann, J. W. Papez.)
BRADLEY,E. MORTON,B.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy,
University of Georgia School of Medicine, Augusta, Ga. (W. F. Alexander,
J. Krafka, Jr.)
BRUESCH,
SIMON
RULIN, A.B., M.S., M.B., Ph.D., M.D., Instruetor in Anatomy,
University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, Tenn. (9. B . Corbin,
L. B. Arey.)
HARD,WALTERLEON,A.B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Histology, Univereity
of Maryland School o f Medicine, Baltimore, Md. ( C . L. Davis, F. H. J. Figge.)
JAILER,JOSEPHWILLIAM,
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.D., Research Assistant in Anatomy,
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New Pork City.
(P. E. Smith, E. T. Engle.)
PKOCEEDINGS
637
LLOYD,
RUTHSMITH,
A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Instructor in Anatomy, Howard University,
Washington, D. C. (R. L. McKinney, .W. M. Cobb.)
MASSON,GEORGES
M. C., D. V. M., Ph.D., Research Associate, McGill University,
Montreal, Canada. (C. P. Maitin, H. Selye.)
NOBACK,CHARLESROBERT,B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Microscopic
Anatomy, University of Georgia School of Medicine, Augusta, Ga. (G. L.
Kelly, L. Allen.)
PEELE,
TALMAQE
LEE,A.B., M.D., Associate in Anatomy, Duke University Medical
School, Durham, N. C. (F. H. Swett, D. C. Hetherington.)
POMERAT,
GERARn ROLAND,A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in Biology, Harvard
University, Cambridge, Mass. (A. B. Dawson, F. L. Hisaw.)
SATTLER,DWIQHT G., M.D., Instructor in Anatomy, State University of Iowa,
College o f Medicine, Iowa City, I a . (W. R. Ingram, E. MacEwen.)
SAUNDERS,
JOHN
S. DEC. M., M.B., Ch.B., F.R.C.S., Professor of Anatomy, Chairman of Division of Anatomy, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.
(R. 0. Moody, W. R. Lyons.)
SCHADEWALD,
MELVIN,B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Instruetor in Anatomy, Medical College
of the S t a t e of South Carolina, Charleston, S. C. (A. M. Lassek, A. T. Rasmnssen.)
WATERMAN,
ALLYNJ., A.B., A.M., Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Biology, W i l liams College, Williamstotvn, Mass. (R. Rugh, L. Hoadley.)
WIERDA,JAYL., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy, School o f Xedicine,
University o f Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. (E. R. Clark, R. G. Williams.)
Meeting or Meetings in 1944. No decision has been reached
regarding a general meeting in 1944, and, in view of the
rapidly changing conditions, none will be made until the Fall
of 1943, when the possibilities will be canvassed. There is a
divergence of opinion among our members regarding the desirability of planning a general meeting during the war. Some
maintain that the authorities in Washington are not unanimously opposed; that such a meeting would aid the “war effort”; that most of the general objections to such meetings
could be met, by avoiding the busy Easter week-end, by meeting in a “non-defense” city away from the Atlantic sea-board,
and by holding the meetings on Friday, Saturday and Monday,
thus avoiding travel on the days Friday through Monday ; that
our group is a relatively small one - etc. It is of interest that
President Allen favored the Montreal meeting this year, and
Prof. Martin of McGill wrote: “I would like to point out that
all the societies of England despite bombings and everything
else maintain their scientific meetings, and I think it would be
638
A M E R I C A N ASSOCIATION OF A N A T O M I S T S
a great disaster to allow any excuse to suppress completely
our scientific and intellectual activities. ”
During the preparation of these Proceedings, announcement
was received from the Secretary, Prof. A. J. E. Cave, of a
meeting of the Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, to be held May 21 and 22, 1943 ; twenty papers and nine
demonstrations were scheduled.
I n case a general meeting is again postponed or omitted, the
Executive Committee will probably repeat the authorization
of local Sectional Meetings. Obviously such meetings, if held
under the name of the “American Association of Anatomists’’
should maintain the established standards and procedures of
the Association. This, however, should apply rather to the
quality of papers presented, than to the specific regulations
regarding number of presentations permitted per member,
since restrictions in the latter have been designed to keep
within reasonable bounds the number of platform papers -a problem which does not apply to the much smaller Sectional
Meetings. This year the Committee which arranged the Philadelphia Sectional Meeting preferred to have titles and abstracts of all papers submitted in the regular way to the
Secretary of the Association; while the Chicago Sectional
Meeting Committee accepted titles directly. The chief difference in the results lies in the fact that abstracts were
printed of all except one of the Philadelphia papers, but of
less than one-half of the Chicago papers. Possibly provision
should be made for printing such abstracts in the Proceedings,
but it would seem simpler to handle them in the regular way.
Furthermore, the officers of the Association can more effectively protect local committees from occasional under-standard
offerings.
The Acting Secretary therefore suggests that those making
tentative plans for 1944 Sectional Meetings consider seriously
the advantages of operating through the National Secretarial
route. Provision will be made for titles and abstracts of
demonstrations and motion pictures, as well as of papers
from platform and by title, and restrictions regarding number
639
PROCEEDINGS
of papers to be given or sponsored by a single member will
undoubtedly be relaxed.
T h e 1943 Sectional Meetings
The following statement appeared in the notice concerning
the Annual Meeting, which was sent to all members in January by the Secretary, F. H. Swett :
“It has been suggested that two or more schools might wish to promote, and
run, informal Sectional Meetings a t the time o f the postponed annual meeting.
If so, it appears that they should be limited to local inhabitants so that travel and
load on hotel accommodations will not be increased. . Brief reports of such
meetings can be published in the Proceedings. ”
. .
I n response to this suggestion, two Sectional Meetings were
organized, one in Chicago and the second in Philadelphia.
T h e Chicago “Sectional” Meeting was held at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, on Friday,
April 23 and Saturday, April 24. Since invitations to take part
in the meeting were sent to places outside the Chicago area
as far away as Cleveland, Louisville, St. Louis and Iowa City,
the Chicago meeting should be labelled a “Regional” rather
than a Sectional’’ Meeting. The Governing Committee was
made up of representatives of the various medical schools in
Chicago, with Dr. L. B. Arey, Chairman, and Dr. G. Von Bonin,
Secretary. Titles of papers and demonstrations were received
by the Committee, with March 15th as the final date. Of the
33 papers submitted, titles and abstracts of 13 were sent to
the Secretary of the Association, and are printed in the
Abstract number of the Anatomical Record (vol. 85, no. 3,
1943). The remaining 20 titles are without abstracts. There
were 4 motion pictures and 9 demonstrations, the former
shown in an evening session and the latter throughout the
meeting. A memoir of former President S. W. Ranson was
read by Leslie B. Arey. Social arrangements included luncheon, tea and dinner-all held on Friday. A resolution of
thanks to Professor Kampmeier and the University of Illinois
College of Medicine was adopted, and there was universal
agreement that the meeting was a great success.
640
A M E R I C A N ASSOCIATION O F A N A T O M I S T S
The program was as follows:
Friday, April 29, 1O:OO a.m.
Deep communications of the renal veins. Barry J. Anson, Earl W. Cauldwell and
James W. Pick, Department of Anatomy, Northwestern University Medical
School.
Postrenal duplication of the inferidr vena cava. Earl W. Cauldwell, Department of
Anatomy, Northwestern University Medical School. (Introduced by Barry
J. Anson.)
Structural alterations in the nervous system resulting from anoxia a t birth. W. F.
Windle and R. F. Becker, Institute of Neurology and Department of Anatomy,
Northweste’rn University Medical School.
On the control of the position and movements of the human mandible. Allan G.
Brodie, Department of Orthodontia, College of Dentistry, University of
Ilinois.
Sensory type neurons in the hypoglossal nerve. Anthony A. Pearson, Department
of Anatomy, Loyola University School of Medicine.
Correlation between sex and chemical composition of the brain of white rats.
Arthur Weil, Institute of Neurology, Northwestern University Medical School.
(Introduced by W. F. Windle.)
The ascending auditory pathway in the brain stem of the monkey. W. T. Barnes
and H. W. Magoun, Institute of Neuroloky, Northwestern University Medical
School.
The ameloblasts in tooth development with respect to the cellular problems of
multiplication, differentiation and change in function. F. Wassermann, Department of Anatomy, University of Chicago.
Intracentral and peripheral factors in the differentiation of motor neurons in
transplanted lumbo-sacral spinal cords of chick embryos. Elmer D. Bueker,
Department of Anatomy, The Chicago Medical School. (Introduced by John J.
Sheinin.)
Stephen Walter Ranson, 1880-1942. I n Memoriam. L. B. Arey, Department of
Anatomy, Northwestern Univeksity Medical School.
Friday, d p r i z 23, 8:oo p . m.
An analysis of the role of magnesium sulphate in evacuation of the biliary tract.
E. A. Boyden, George S. Bergh, John A. Layne, Department of Anatomy,
University of Minnesota.
The antidiuretic potency of the neurohypophysis of the cat after stalk section.
Kendrick Hare and Donald M, Phillips, Department of Anatomy, State University of Iowa, College of Medicine.
The stria terminalis longitudinal association bundle and precommissnral fornix.
C. A. Fox, Department of Anatomy, Marquette University and Institute of
Neurology, Northwestern IJniversity Medical School.
Early development of the human corpus lnteum. William W. Greulich, Western
Reserve University School of Medicine.
PROCEEDINGS
641
Further studies on adrenal innervation. Transplantation as a method in determining the distribution of nerves to the adrenal gland. William E. MacFarland,
Department of Anatomy, The Chicago Medical School. (Introduced by
John J. Sheinin.)
Observations on the polyuria produced by desoxycorticosterone acetate. C. A.
Winter and W. R. Ingram, Department of Anatomy, The State University of
Iowa, College of Medicine.
An experimental analysis of the inferior mesenteric plexus. Albert J. Harris,
St. Louis University School of Medicine. (Introduced by Albert Kuntz.)
The vaginal smear of the rat: Some new questions pdrtially answered. Carl G .
Hartman, George Svihla, R. C. Melick, Department of Zoology, University of
Illinois.
A comparison of certain mammalian midbrain centers. Elizabeth Crosby and
Russell T. Woodburne, Department of Anatomy, University of Michigan.
Morphologic effects of prostigmine, quinidine and curare on the secretion mechanism
of motor end plates. Eben J. Caiey, Leo C. Massopust, Walter Zeit, John T.
Schmitz, James T. Keyes, Department of Anatomy, Marquette University.
Morphologic effects of fatigue and anoxia on the secretion mechanism of motor end
plates. Eben 3. Carey, Leo C. Massopust, Walter Zeit, John T. Schmitz,
James T. Keyes, Department of Anatomy, Marquette University.
At this session W. F. Windle showed lantern slides illustrating S. I. Kornhauser ’s quadruple stain. (The slides were also demonstrated.)
Friday, April 25, 8:50 p . m.
Motion pictures :
Observations on the minute vessels and lymphatic capillaries in the wing membrane
of living bats. Paul A. Nicoll, Department of Physiology, Indiana University
Medical School, (Introduced by R. L. Jones.)
Dissection of the cranial cavity for use in teaching gross anatomy, David S. Jones,
Loyola University School of Medicine.
Developmental anomalies of the face and mouth. J. J. McDonald, Department of
Anatomy, Northwestern University Medical SchooI. (Introduced by L. B.
Arey.)
Brain lesions and affective behavior in eats. Max D. Wheatley, Department of
Anatomy, The State University of Iowa, College of Medicine. (Introduced
by W. R. Ingram.)
Saturday, April 24, 9:00 a.m.
Regenerative processes induced by gonadotropic hormones in irradiated testes
of the albino rat. J. M. Essenberg and Emanuele Momigliano, Loyola University School of Medicine.
On the “crypts” of the human pharyngeal tonsil. L. B. Arey, Anatomy Depait.
ment of Northwestern ‘Iiniversity Medical School.
Phagocytosis of colloidal thorium dioxide. 0. A. Mortensen, Department of
Anatomy, University of Wisconsin.
642
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ANATOMISTS
The cytology of the human trophoblast in reliltion to hormone production. Burton
L. Baker, S. J. Hook, A. E. Severinghaus, Departments of Anatomy, University
of Michigan and Columbia University.
The mechanism of nasopharyngeal occlusion. Leon H. Strong, Department of
Anatomy, University of Michigan.
The role of sebaceous glands in absorption of lipid-soluble carcinogens applied to
skin. William L. Simpson and William Cramer, The Barnard Free Skin and
Cancer Hospital.
The type of paralysis following section of the basis pedunculi and dorsal lateral
chordotomy in Macaca mulatta monkeys. B. W. Cannon, L. E. Beaton, 9. W.
Ranson, Jr., H. W. Magoun, Institute of Neurology, Northwestern Univeksity
Medical School.
Non-production of adiposity in the rat by septal, preoptic and rostra1 hypothalamic
lesions. A. W. Hetherington, Institute of Neurology, Northwestern University
Medical School.
Disturbances of sexual function in the female guinea pig following injury to the
median eminence. F. L. Dey, Institute of Neurology, Northwestern University
Medical School.
Development of motor nuclei and fiber tracts after removal of large portions of
the brain. Ruth Rhines, Department of Anatomy, Northwestern University
Medical School. (Introduced by W. F. Windle.)
Further studies on the origin of the cilia’ry ganglion. David S. Jones, Loyoln
University School of Medicine.
The arterial pattern in the fore- and hind-limbs of the opossum. Arnold A.
Zimmermann, Department of Anatomy, University of IllYnois.
Demonstrations exhibited during the time of the meeting :
a. The grooved nuclei of Brenner tumor cells. b. Origin of a B’renner tumor
from the germinal epithelium of the ovary. L. B. Arey, Department of
Anatomy, Northwestern University Medical Rehool.
Some of the more important features of the Huber six-somite human embryo.
L. B. Arey and J. W. Hende’rson, Department of Anatomy, Northwestern
University Medical School.
The ossification of the modiolus. T. H. Bast, Department of Anatomy, University
of Wisconsin.
The precentral motor cortex of primates. Gerhardt von Bonin, Department of
Anatomy, University of Illinois.
Anatomy of the female pelvis and perineum. Arthur H. Curtis, Barry J. Anson,
Tom Jones, Franklin L. Ashley and Lindsay E. Beaton, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics and Department of Anatomy, Northwestern University
Medical School ; Illustkation Studios, University of Illinois.
Persistent pronephric tubule opening into cephalic end of coelom in a 9-IOmm.
human embryo. Otto F. Kampmeier, Department of Anatomy, University of
Illinois.
The activity of small vessels in the wing membrane of living bats. Paul S. Nicoll,
Department of Physiology, Indiana University Medical School. (Introduced
by R. L. Jones.)
PROCEEDINGS
643
A simple quartz rod illuminator suitable f o r research or student use. William L.
Simpson, The Ba'rnard Free Skin and Cancer Hospital.
The mechanism of nasopharyngeal occlusion. Leon H. Strong, Department of
Anatomy, University of Michigan.
The Philadelphia Sectional Meeting. At the invitation of
The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, the Association
members residing in Philadelphia and its immediate environs,
Swarthmore and Bryn Mawr, organized an informal Sectional
Meeting which was held at The Wistar Institute on Thursday,
April 22 and Friday, April 23. With the exception of one
paper and the address of the Acting President, the titles and
abstracts of all communications were submitted to the Secretary of the Association in the regular way, and printed in the
Abstract number of The Anatomical Record (vol. 85, no. 3,
1943). This procedure was adopted in order to ensure maintehance of the standards of the Association. There were 17
papers, 2 motion pictures, an address by the Acting President
of the Association and informal demonstrations of research
and other activities of The Wistar Institute by staff members.
The informal Committee was made up of representatives of the
various medical schools in Philadelphia, with J . P. Schaeffer,
Chairman, E. J. Farris, Secretary and E. R. Clark, Program.
Total registration was 34, of whom 27 were members of the
Association, while a count of those attending the meetings
reached the total of 261.
There were five visiting Anatomists from outside the Philadelphia Section, among them Prof. C. P. W. McClure and
Prof. J. S. Nicholas. The latter, on request, spoke informally
of the impact of the war on Anatomy. He urged Anatomists
not to abandon their chosen lines of research, since results
of value to war medicine and surgery were at least as likely to
come from fundamental investigations as from research on
specific war problems. He predicted that medical students
in the near future would be decidedly less mature-17 to 18
years old, with 18 months of college, requiring more skillful
teaching than in the past. A further prediction was that there
would be an increased need for medical men for 18 years after
the end of the war.
644
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION O F ANATOMISTS
At the end of the final session a resolution of’ appreciation
of The Wistar Institute was adopted. Regarding future meetings the following motion was passed: “This group is of the
opinion that local sectional meetings should be again authorized by the Executive Committee, in case national or regional
meetings seem inadvisable. ” I n the discussion, several, including Dr. Nicholas, favored a national meeting for next
year. All agreed that the Philadelphia Sectional Meeting had
been profitable, delightful and worth repeating. No especial
luncheon, dinner or smoker arrangements were made.
The program was as follows:
l ’ h m d a y , April 32, b:OO p . m.
The derivatives of the thalamus ventralis in the human brain. H. Kuhlenbeck,
Woman ’s Medical College of Pennsylvania.
Pigmentation of substantia nigra and locus eaeruleus in certain carnivores. J. 0.
Brown, University of Pennsylvania. (Introduced by E. R. Clark.)
The course and decussation of ectopic Mauthner ’s fibers in Amblystoma punctatiini.
J. Piatt, University of Pennsylvania.
The hypophysis of the goose-fish (Lophius pisc. L.). W. H. F. Addison, University
of Pennsylvania.
The origin of the hypoglossal musculature in the cat. M. N. Bates, Daniel Baugh
Institute of Anatomy, Jefferson Medical College.
The drainage pathways of lymph from the thyroid gland (cat). A. J. Ramsay,
Daniel Baugh Institute of Anatomy, Jefferson Medical College. (Illustrated
by motion picture.)
The formation of venae comites. E. R. Clark and Eleanor Linton Clark, University
of Pennsylvania.
Vascular reactions to histamine as seen with the mickoscope in living, unanaesthetized rabbits. R. G. Abell, University of Pennsylvania.
Demonstrations by The Wistar Institute Staff
Following the Thursday afternoon session for the reading of papers, members of
the staff of The Wistar Institute demonstrated some of the phases of the research
and other activities of the Institute. The demonstrations were presented by
Dr. W. H. Lewis, Dr. Margaret Lewis, Dr. Helen D. King, Dr. Paul Aptekman,
Dr. E. J. Farris. Dr. Eleanor Yeakel and Miss Meeser.
8:OO
P.M.
Address by the Acting President of the Association, Dr. J. Parsons Schaeffet:
The incidence, types, and embryology of congenital atresias of the choanae.
This was followed by two motion pictures:
PROCEEDINGS
645
The biology of reproduction in rats. E. J. Farris, The Wistar Institute of Anatomy
and Biology. (Abstract in Anat. Rec., v. 84, no. 4, p. 481, 1942.)
The formation of the blastodisc in the egg of the zebra fish, Brachydania rerio.
W. H. Lewis and E. C. Roosen-Runge, The Wista'r Institute of Anatomy and
Biology and Brown University.
Friday, April 23, 9:30 a. m.
A morphological, experimental, and clinical study of the semitendineus muscle in
various animals, including man. G . A. Bennett, Daniel Baugh Institute of
Anatomy, Jefferson Medical College.
The cricopharyngeus mcscle. 0. V. Batson, Graduate School of Medicine, University
of Pennsylvania.
Subdivision of the lung on the basis of bronchial distribution. J. F. Huber,
Temple University Medical School.
The variational anatomy of the hepatic and cystic arteries. N. -4.Michels, Daniel
Baugh Institute' of Anatomy, Jefferson Medical College.
The early development of the spino-sensory system in the albino rat. A. W.
Angulo, Hahneman Medical School. (No abstract.)
Effects of a neurophysiological stimulus on the breeding of albino rats. E. J. Farris
and E. H. Yeakel, The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology. (Abstract
in Anat. Rec., v. 84, no. 4, p. 454, 1942.)
Early implantation and shortened gestation in the marten. R. K. Enders and
0. P. Pearson, Swarthmore College and U. 8. Department of the Interior.
The role of the superficial gel layer in gastrulation of the zebra fish egg. W. H.
Lewis, The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology.
Trichomonas vaginalis in tissue cultures. M. J. Hogue, University of Pennsylvania.
(Illustrated by motion picture.)
ELIOT
R. CLdRK,
Acting Secretary-Treasurer
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