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Dec. [email protected], 135.
A, MOORE;
Z,@23,817
SUPPLEMENTARY FUEL SUPPLY APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
Filed March 18, 1927
2 Sheets-Sheet l
46
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26
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'2d
INVENTOR
ATTORNEYS
Des. M1), 135.
2,®23,817
A. MOORE
SUPPLEMENTARY FUEL SUPPLY APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
Filed March 18, 1927
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
BY
ATTORNEYS
Patented Dec. 10, 1935
2,023,817
UNETED STATES
PATENT’ OFFICE
2,023,817
SUPPLEMENTARY FUEL SUPPLY APPARA
TUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION EN
GINES
Arlington Moore, New York, N. Y., assignor, by
mesne assignments, to Maxmoor Corporation,
New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware
Application March 18, 1927, Serial No. 176,410
31 Claims. (Cl. 123-427)
My invention relates to internal combustion arate level control for the supplemental fuel
engines consuming volatile liquid fuel, and par
supply. Thus the fuel supply is available for the
ticularly to an apparatus and process for fuel supplemental fuel feeding apparatus, from the
supply therefor for engine starting and at peri
ods of acceleration, supplementary to fuel delivery
through the carburetor.
The invention of the present application is a
further extension and development of the inven
tion of my application Serial #164,349, ?led Jan.
10 28, 1927..
same source and in the same manner as the main
fuel feed to the carburetor.
The auxiliary fuel feeding apparatus of my in
vention is automatically operated adjunctively to
throttling, as for example, the control means
therefor may be inter-linked with the throttle so
that same are automatically operated adjunc
tively to throttling and without requiring manual
A feature of the present invention'consists in
the breaking up of the fuel by admixture of air
manipulation or special attention on the part of
therewith prior to deliveryto the engine intake.
the operator.
Another feature consists in the delivery of such
15 broken up mixture of fuel and air to the intake
conduit through a delivery nozzle adapted to
further subdivide the fuel into a state of subdivi
sion amounting to substantially a “foggy” or
vapor state well adapted for thorough admixture
with the other charge components prior to deliv~
cry to the engine cylinders.
Another important feature of the invention is
that the fuel is delivered by my improved appa
ratus under a gravity head, so that substantially
25 immediate delivery of the supplementary fuel is
obtained upon mere release thereof, supplemen
tary to intake depression or suction.
Without the provision of supplementary appa
ratus such as I have devised, carburetors of inter
nal combustion engines require a fairly rich and
uneconomical adjustment of the carburetor. With
the use of my invention, by which fuel under
gravity head is supplied at certain times above
the throttle, the carburetor adjustment may be
35 as lean as is consistent with obtaining good
power with economy, and further the carburet
ors and intake manifold passages may be en
larged, thereby cutting down the intake manifold
depression and reducing pumping losses.
The fuel for the supplementary fuel feeding
apparatus of my invention is preferably taken
from the same source as fuel supplied to the
carburetor. In the case of an automobile engine,
for example, both are supplied from a main fuel
45 tank, and when the fuel tank is located low down
in the machine and fuel is lifted by devices such
as a vacuum tank, this vacuum tank is made
to serve as the immediate source of supply for
‘both the carburetor and the auxiliary fuel feed.
When the vacuum tank is located at a su?i
ciently high level as is common in automobile
ractice, it is a convenience to connect my auxil
iary fuel feeding apparatus thereto so that the
fuel will rise therein to the fuel level maintained
in the vacuum tank, thereby dispensing with sep
.
With a carburetor adjusted for obtaining lean,
economical mixtures, and particularly where the
intake manifold and carburetor are of extra large
size, difficulties will frequently be encountered in
starting, but with the use of the apparatus of
my invention, which provides for gravity release
into the intake manifold of a limited quantity or
slug of fuel at starting, the engine can be readily
started and run with sumcient fuel supply during
a period suiiicient for warming up after which
it can be operated on the regular mixture sup
plied by the carburetor and economical opera
tion can be obtained; the usual choke valve and
manual control mechanism therefor can be dis
pensed with, together with the indraft of large
quantities of raw fuel at starting, which is a
prevalent cause of crank case oil dilution.
With the use of the ordinary carburetor de
pending upon intake depression or suction for
fuel supply and particularly when the carburetor
is set for a lean adjustment, when the throttle
is opened for accelerating the engine speed, a
period of charge supply will ensue in which the
mixture will be excessively lean by reason of the
excess of inertia of liquid fuel over that of the
air component of the charge, and if this period
is passed without the engine stopping, the fuel
supply will gradually catch up with the air sup
ply so that the engine will operate with the proper
mixture at the wider throttle opening,but the
expected acceleration will have been delayed
until the induced flow of fuel begins to “come 45
through”.
It is customary to set carburetors for a some
what richer mixture than for best and most eco
nomical running, in order to get the necessary
supply of fuel with the air and prevent fuel
starving during acceleration.
With the use of my invention, di?iculties of
this sort are avoided. Upon opening the throt
tle for acceleration a supply of auxiliary fuel is
introduced by gravity and there is no delay or
2,023,817
lag in the fuel supply relative to the air supply.
The additional supply of fuel so obtained is cut
off as soon as the acceleration is complete. This
eliminates any need for rich carburetor adjust
ment with its resulting lack of economy, enabling
the engine to be operated on desirably lean mix
tures.
'
Provision is made according to my invention
so that the feeding of the supplemental fuel takes
10 place only upon the advance or opening-up move
ments of the throttle, and the return or closing
movement of the throttle is not productive of
feeding supplemental fuel. For this purpose I
preferably make use of a mechanical movement
15 of my invention including a rotating member with
raised camming surfaces cooperating with a
roller running in an inclined slot formed in the
member to be actuated, whereby the member
actuated by the roller is operated when the rotat
ing or camming member pushes or thrusts the
roller toward the lower end of the slot in which it
rides, and it is not actuated when the roller is
pushed in the opposite direction, the roller mere
ly riding freely to the upper end of the slot at
25 such times without producing any actuating
'movement of the member in which that slot is
formed.
This arrangement giving a limited supply of
supplementary fuel during the advance throttle
movement, and doing away therewith during the
retractile throttle movement, is productive of
conservation of fueland eliminates engine car~
bonizing and other evils customarily encountered
in engine deceleration. In deceleration of the
35 engine the reverse situation as to relative inertia
of the heavy fuel and the light air is encountered,
i. e., that notwithstanding the air supply is cut
off on the partial closing of the throttle for ob
taining engine deceleration, the heavier fuel with
40 the relatively greater inertia comes through for
a further interval without a corresponding re
duction in quantity, thus producing a temporary
condition of over-richness. Were the supple
mental feeding apparatus to function for feeding
45 of supplemental fuel during the return or decel
eration movement of the throttle, this already
temporary over-rich condition during decelera
tion throttle movement would be still further in
creased by the resulting additional supply of
50 the supplementary fuel. With my invention,
however, eliminating auxiliary. fuel feeding dur
ing periods of deceleration, and with the de
scribed ability to operate the carburetor with a
lean and economical adjustment, such temporary.
55 over-richness during deceleration movements of
60
65
70
'
paratus and the delivery nozzle therefor con
nected to the intake manifold, and
, Fig. 3 is a detail sectional view on line 3—3,
Fig. 2.
Reference character I0 designates the intake 5
manifold of an internal combustion engine, l2
the carburetor, M- the vacuum tank, !6 the main
fuel tank, and IS the supplemental fuel feeding
device of the present invention having its operat
ing crank 20 connected by link 22 with the throt- 10
tle lever 24 which is operated through any con
venient operating means such as a link 26. Any
desired relation in extent of throw of crank 22
of the supplemental fuel feeding device l8 can
be obtained by making the crank 20 of suitable 15
length. The auxiliary fuel feeding device i8 is
shown and described in my said copending ap
plication, and comprises a central housing 28,
containing a fuel well or receptacle 3%, having
a relatively small or constricted outlet duct 32, 2O
controlled by a needle valve 34, which is nor
mally held closed by a spring 36, introduced be
tween the plug 38, apertured for the passage of
needle as, and the shoulder 46 on the needle
valve 34.
25
Supply of fuel to well 30 is controlled by the
pin or needle valve 42, which works in a tube
44 screwed into an extension 46 of the casing
member 28 and controls flow of fuel supplied by
the supply pipe 48 through the passage 59 com- 30
municating with the well 30. The needle 52 is
lifted by a spring 52 working against a shoulder
56 on said needle, which spring, however, is more
?exible than the spring 33 of needle valve 34.
The well 39 is vented to the air as by means of 35
duct 56 formed in the cap 53 which is screwed
into the upper part of casing 28 and receives the
plug 38. Needle valves 34 and 42 are so actuated
that but one thereof can be opened at a time.
In the form shown, the cross bar 69 is pivoted to 40
needle 42 at 62 and to needle 34 at 55 and
also has a pivotal connection to the actuating
plunger 55 at 88.
The regulating lever 68 and
the projecting heads of the plunger and levers
are preferably covered by means of a cap ‘l0 so 45
as to exclude access of foreign material to the
working parts and to prevent injury thereof.
The means for operating plunger 68 and thereby
the needle valves 34 and 42 are preferably housed
in a case 72 attached to the side of casing 28, 50
and comprise a lever 74 pivotally supported in
said case on pivot pin 16 and loosely pivoted to
the plunger 66 at T8. The lever ‘M preferably
comprises a pair of separated side bars TM’, and
inclined slots 89 are formed in said side bars 74’ 55
of lever 713. A roller 82 received in the slots 89
the throttle is not su?icient to produce substané
tial ?ooding or loading up of liquid fuel on the 7 forms a contact member for coacting with cam
manifold walls, and the engine provided with the 84, to the shaft 86 whereof the crank 26 above
invention and with the lean carburetor setting referred to is connected. Cam 83 is of circular
can be operated without the effects of engine outline except for the two projecting camming 60
carbonizing and crank case oil dilution, cylinder surfaces 88 and 90. Projection 88 is for eifect
?ooding, and loadingr up of liquid fuel on the ing the feeding of auxiliary fuel at starting and
during low partial throttle opening and is rela
intake manifold walls, attendant upon excess tively short, whereas the projecting cam portion
fuel supply at deceleration.
953 for effecting fuel supply upon‘substantially 65
For the purpose of affording an understanding wide opening of the throttle for general accel
of my invention and the principles of its opera
eration purposes is relatively elongated as will be
tion I have illustrated an embodiment thereof in plain from the showing of Fig. 3. The direction
the accompanying drawings in whichi
V
of rotation of cam 84 corresponding to opening
Fig. 1 is an assembly view showing the intake movement of the throttle is indicated by the 70
system of an internal combustionengine equipped arrow on Fig. 3.
with a supplemental fuel feeding means in ac
The operation of the parts sr described will be
cordance with my invention; ‘
-
r
Fig. 2 is a view on an enlarged scale in verti
' readily understood from the foregoing.
Upon a
slight opening of the throttle, the lever ‘M is
775 cal section of the supplemental fuel feeding 'ap ~ raised by the actuation thereof through the roller 75
2,023,817
82 by cam projection 88, roller 82 being forced
to the lower end of slot 80 and so producing a
lifting movement of lever 74 and of the plunger
66 to which said lever is attached. The upward
movement of plunger 6% serves first to close the
supply needle G2 against the light spring 52, thus
shutting off the supply opening 50 of well 343, and
as soon as the supply needle 42 is seated, the de
livery needle 34 is raised, thereby discharging
10 auxiliary fuel by gravity through the delivery pas
sage .32. Upon reverse movement of the cam 84,
assuming that it has not been turned so as to
bring the cam projection 98] into operative rela
13
duction and lifting, as in the case of a carburetor
jet located above the fuel level. Provision is made
for breaking up the fuel supplied to the nozzle
I82 by means-of admixture or bleeding of air
therewith. In the form shown the outlet conduit 5
I38 from the casing 28 is connected to a housing
IIil screwed into a hole H2 in the intake mani
fold I0 from which housing II ll nozzle I82 pro
jects into the interior of the intake manifold Iii
substantially across the bore thereof.
10
The housing I I 0 contains the air feeding means,
which in the form shown comprises a hollow
needle member II4 having a very ?ne or narrow
tion, the roller 82 moves to the opposite end of ‘ bore screwed into housing H8 and held in place
15 the slot 83 and the cam 84 can be returned to
by screw H8, and having its mouth II8 directed 15
its original position without raising the plunger
66 and without affecting fuel delivery. The same
operation applies to the cam projection 90 com
ing into operation upon substantially Wide open
20 turning of the throttle and corresponding move
ment of the cam 84, with the exception that
whereas cam 88 will be passed very quickly with
out necessarily emptying the well 30, said well
30 Will be completely emptied when the cam pro
25 jection 96 operates to lift the plunger 66 and the
control device such as the accelerator pedal is
kept in such position. As soon as the accelerator
pedal is released, with resulting turning of cam
85 in the direction opposite to that indicated by
arrow of Fig. 3, the roller 82 moves to the upper
end of slot 80 and the delivery needle 3a is in -
mediately closed, whereupon supply needle 42 is
opened and well 36 re?lled. The well 39 is also
replenished upon opening movement of the
35 throttle after the nib 88 disengages the roller 82
but before engagement of the portion 96 with the
I roller 82, the valve 122 then being open and valve
365 closed.
The casing 28 of the auxiliary fuel feed device
40 is preferably located at such height that when
connected as by means of a tubular connection
58 with the source of fuel supply, such as a vacu
um twk I4, the average level as indicated for
example in dotted lines in Fig. 1, will be sufficient
to supply an adequate slug of fuel for accelera
tion in the well 30. The line 48 preferably con
tains a cutoff valve 94 for convenience in making
any necessary changes and adjustments, and a
strainer 96 for keeping dirt out of the fuel line
to the supplemental feeding devices and from
interfering with the operation of the mechanism
thereof.
The vacuum tank I4, as shown has the usual
source of suction as by means of the tubular con
55 nection 93 to the intake‘ I6, and delivers fuel in
the ordinary Way to the carburetor I2 by means
of the tubular connection Hill, but suction can
be applied in other ways.
.
In my copending application above referred to
60 no provision was made for breaking up or sub
dividing fuel delivered to the intake manifold.
According to the present invention provision is
made for this purpose, and the construction is
such that the device may be supplied as an ac
cessory and ordinary intake manifolds such as
are already in use equipped therewith without
any undue constriction of the manifold passage.
The preferred form of connection comprises a
preferably tubular nozzle I32 provided with a
plurality of ?ne fuel outlet openings I 94, and
plugged at its end as indicated at IE6. Inasmuch
as nozzle IE2 is below the fuel supply level and
the fuel supply delivery through openings I64 is
under a gravity head, these openings can be much
smaller than jet openings required for fuel in
into the bore of nozzle I02, the fuel coming
through the tubular connection I08 passing into
the nozzle I82 around the needle member HQ.
The extent of opening of the fuel passage is regu
lated by screwing the air needle H4 in or out. A 20
provision which is preferably made to exclude
access of foreign material to and clogging the
bore of needle I I4 comprises porous material I25,
such as absorbent cotton or the like, contained
in the hollow interior of the screw cap I22, 25
screwed on housing III‘! and perforated at lid
for admission of air. It will be seen that with
this arrangement the fuel is thoroughly broken
up by the admixture of air therewith prior to
delivery of such mixture through the minute 30
openings I94 formed in the nozzle I02 and is fur
ther subdivided by the forceful gravity delivery
thereof supplementing the engine induction
through the plurality of very small holes I64.
Thus a highlysubdivided and fog-like fuel and 35
air mixture issues from the minute openings in
nozzle I02, and is suspended in the air stream
without the entire reliance for fuel supply upon
intake suction and air velocity through the intake
passages. Furthermore the nozzle IE2 is located 40
in the engine intake above the throttle and pref
erably close up to the branch point thereof, so
that the supplemental fuel, supplied by gravity
upon opening the throttle for acceleration or
opening and closing the throttle preliminary to 45
starting, is supplied by the same movement that
opens the throttle and is available directly there
with with no lag of fuel supply behind the inrush
of air produced by opening the throttle.
It will be apparent that the ordinary butterfly 50
choke valve, with which carburetors are cus
tomarily supplied, to be closed at starting, can
be dispensed with, and with the provision of my
invention, the throttle itself upon being opened
to release the gravity fuel supply and again be- 55
ing closed will serve all the purposes of the or
dinary choke valve at starting.
It is substantially impossible to stall an engine
equipped with my invention as will frequently
happen with the ordinary engine when the 60
throttle is opened in expectation of obtaining ac
celeration from a low speed; since with my inven
tion the same movement which produces the
opening of the throttle also results in the supply
by gravity of the fuel to be admixed with air and 65
directly supplied to the cylinders. In this way
impoverishment of the mixture, engine stalling,
back-?ring, etc., which will be experienced upon
acceleration with the engine equipped with the 70
ordinary carburetor, particularly if set lean, is
eliminated, and at the same time it becomes pos
sible to make use of lean economical carburetor
adjustments, and the saving of fuel obtained
thereby more than compensates for the small 76
2,023,817
4
flow of fuelfrom the‘ chamber 30 will not vary
appreciably due to changes or variations in the
intake depression at points more remote. It has
been determined that the amount of air supplied
through the opening I24 is insufficient to pro- 5
duce a combustible mixture with the supple
mental fuel, and hence the main air stream is
quantities of fuel fed for the purpose of the sup
plementary fuel supply.
With the apparatus of my invention, the ?lling
of the auxiliary fuel well being accomplished by
gravity, there is no need as in the case of the
ordinary carburetor with the usual accelerating
well, to substantially close the throttle after once
relied on to furnish the necessary air to the fuel
for the delivery of a high torque fuel and air
mixture into the cylinders.
10
The scope of my invention is as de?ned by
accelerating before a second acceleration is pos
sible.
This is because with my apparatus even a
10 slight return movement of the throttle produces
a closing movement of the delivery needle 34, fol
the following claims, it being understood that
changes and modi?cations within the scope
lowed by the opening of the supply needle 42.
Thus the device may be made use of for acceler
thereof are included within the invention.
ating purposes repeatedly without any necessity
I claim:
of the throttle being, closed or substantially closed
If without the use of my invention a carbu
an idling jet is set lean for economical running,
the opening of the throttle and the consequent
reducing of the depression on the carburetor
idling jet will result in the fuel no longer being
lifted through the idling jet, while at the same
time if the engine speed was low before the
25
throttle was opened, as for example at idling
speed, when the throttle is opened, there will not
be sufficient air velocity past the main fuel jet
to lift the requisite proportion of fuel and the
for admixing air with and breaking up the fuel
prior to delivery through the nozzle to the intake
conduit.
2. Apparatus for supply of supplemental fuel 25
to the intake conduit of an internal combustion
engine, comprising a source of fuel supply, means
operated adjunctively to the throttling of the
engine for effecting gravity delivery of fuel from
such source in limited quantity, a nozzle ex- 30
engine will stop and in the case of an automo
30 bile engine the vehicle will be stalled. Thus
there is quite a severe limitation on the size and
tending into the intake and connected to such
delivery means, a taper needle for regulating the
extent of fuel supply opening to the nozzle, an
air bore formed in such needle and connecting
leanness of carburetors and carburetor adjust
ments for average running of an engine equipped
with such large carburetor. With my invention,
however, this critical period is not encountered,
since with the opening of the throttle fuel is dis
40
with the nozzle, a cap for enclosing the head of 35
the needle, said cap being perforated for passage
of air and being provided with a ?lling of ?lter
charged into the intake conduit, or in other
words, poured, into the engine intake above the
throttle, supplying the need for fuel during this
ing material, such as absorbent cotton, whereby
otherwise critical period.
This supplementary
bination with the intake, main fuel supplying
fuel is exhausted during the speeding up of the
engine obtained by opening the throttle and as
the engine speed is obtained in this way, the
supply of fuel from the main jet, which has
caught up with the accelerated air velocity, takes
up its normal function of supply of fuel in the
means, a source of fuel supply therefor, and
throttle, of means for supplying supplementary
fuel from said source of supply to the intake,
air bleeding means associated therewith for com- 45
minuting said supplementary fuel, and means
normally closing said supplementary fuel sup
requisite proportions.
plying means and operated adjunctively with the
throttling for releasing said supplementary fuel
dirt is excluded from the needle bore.
3. In an internal combustion engine, the com- 40
The chamber 38 is of a size predetermined to
contain substantially the maximum amount of
50 supplemental fuel required to form a high or
and causing a flow thereof under a pressure sup~ 50
plementary to that due to the engine induction
maximum torque fuel and air mixture when the
supplemental fuel is delivered to the main fuel
and air stream at the period of fuel impoverish
ment thereof. The supplemental fuel when re
leased is fed through the constricted outlet 32 at
a rate to supply the same approximately uni
and potentially available when said adjunctive
formly throughout the period of impoverish
bination with the intake, main fuel supplying
ment to compensate for or to cure the fuel defi
ciencies occuring in the main fuel and air stream.
The head of supplemental fuel provides a poten
tially available pressure which is rendered ac
tive when the valve 34 is opened to feed the fuel
by pressure supplementary to the pressure due
to the engine induction.
65
15
to the manifold branches, means interlinked with
the throttle for gravity delivery of fuel to said
nozzle during opening throttle movement only, 20
and at parts only of such movement, and means
retor is provided of large size to obtain lowered
intake depression, and such a carburetor having
20
.
1. In an internal combustion engine, a nozzle
inserted in the intake conduit relatively close up
between successive periods of acceleration.
'
The size of the air opening is regulated to per
mit of the introduction of sui?cient air by engine
induction for effecting the complete disintegra
tion of the fuel without unduly choking or re
tarding the flow of supplemental fuel by gravity,
and without unduly reducing the intake depres
sion. The introduction of the disintegrating air
ly operated means is closed, whereby to discharge
said supplementary fuel in a ?nely divided state
intd the main fuel and 'air stream upon certain 55
of the opening movements of the throttle.
4. In an internal combustion engine, the com
means, a source of fuel supply therefor, and
throttle, of means for taking supplementary fuel 60
from the same source of supply and delivering
the same by gravity to the intake above the
throttle, and means normally closing said last
named means and interposed between the same
and the intake operated adjunctively with the 65
throttle for releasing said supplementary fuel,
whereby to discharge the same into the main
fuel and air stream upon certain of the opening
movements of the throttle.
5. In an internal combustion engine, an intake, 7 0
main fuel supplying means, throttle, means for
supplying supplementary fuel to said intake,
at a point'in proximity to the point of issuance
for comminuting said fuel, valvular means
of the gravity fed supplemental fuel provides a means
normally’ closing said supplementary fuel supply
zone about said point of issuancelwhich is at ' ing means, and means operated adjunctively with 75
substantially atmospheric pressure so that the
2,023,817’
the throttle for actuating said valvular means
at an interval during opening movement of the
throttle and including means effective unidirec
tionally for rendering said actuating means in
operative to open said valvular means during
closing movement of the throttle.
5
12. The hereindescribed process of supplying
auxiliary fuel for engine acceleration which com
prises delivering a limited quantity of auxiliary
fuel from a main supply into a receptacle and
discharging the auxiliary fuel from the recep- 5
tacle adjunctively to‘ throttling, the fuel being
discharged by gravity from the receptacle im
mediately upon acceleration independently of the
ceptacle for supplementary fuel, a discharge main fuel supply into the intake at the engine
10 nozzle therefrom extending into’ the intake above ' side of the throttling point-at a, point towards 10
the intake ports relatively remote from the point
the throttle, and adapted to receive fuel by grav
ity from said receptacle, an air bleed into said of introduction of the main fuel.
6. In an internal combustion engine, an in
take, main fuel supplying means, throttle, a re
nozzle, and valvular means operated adjunctive
ly with the throttling for controlling the passage
A
15 of fuel to said nozzle and air bleed.
7. In an internal combustion engine, an intake,
main fuel supplying means, a source of fuel sup
prises delivering main fuel into the air passing to 15v
the engine cylinders, and adjunctively to
throttling supplying a limited quantity of fuel
ply therefor, a throttle, a receptacle in communi
from a main fuel receptacle into an auxiliary
cation With said source of fuel supply and re
receptacle and discharging the fuel by gravity
20 plenished therefrom, a nozzle therefrom extend
ing into the intake above the throttle and
adapted to receive fuel by gravity from said re
ceptacle, means for admixing air with and break
ing up the fuel prior to delivery through the
25 nozzle to the intake, valvular means normally
closing the passage from said receptacle to said
nozzle, and means operated adjunctively with the
throttling for opening said valvular means at in
tervals during opening movement of the throttle,
30 and including means effective unidirectionally
for rendering said actuating means inoperative
to open said valvular means upon closing move
ment of the throttle.
8. In an internal combustion engine, the com
35 bination with the intake, main fuel supplying
means, and throttle, of means for supplying sup
plementary fuel to the intake under a potentially
available pressure differential greater than that
effective on the main fuel, means normally clos
40 ing said supplementary fuel supplying means,
and operated adjunctively to throttling for re
leasing said fuel upon opening movement of the
throttle, and means intermediate the closing
means and the intake for comminuting the fuel
45 released.
9. The hereindescribed process of supplying
auxiliary fuel for engine acceleration which
therefrom into the air at a point towards the 20
engine intake ports relatively remote from the
point of introduction of main fuel so that the
charge during acceleration enters the cylinders
substantially without lag in the fuel supply rela
tive to the air supply.
25
Ill. The hereindescribed process of supplying
auxiliary fuel for engine acceleration which com
prises delivering main fuel into the air passing
to the engine cylinders, and adjunctively to
throttling effecting the delivery of a limited quan- 30
tity of fuel from a main fuel supply into an aux
iliary receptacle, and discharging said auxiliary
fuel by gravity, and under atmospheric pressure,
into the engine intake manifold at a point rela
tively remote from the point of introduction of 35
main fuel and close up to the manifold branches
so that the charge enters the cylinders upon
acceleration substantially without lag of fuel sup
ply relative to the air supply.
- 15. The process of preparing charge mixtures 40
for internal combustion engines which comprises
delivering a limited quantity of fuel by gravity
from a main source of supply into an auxiliary
receptacle, and upon engine acceleration dis
charging the fuel from the auxiliary receptacle by 45
gravity into the intake while closing off the sup
plying of fuel to the auxiliary receptacle during
comprises effecting the delivery of auxiliary fuel
acceleration fuel discharge only.
from a main supply into a receptacle and the dis
16. The process in accordance with claim 15 in
which the auxiliary fuel is discharged at a point 50
50 charge therefrom adjunctively to throttling, the
auxiliary fuel being discharged by gravity im
mediately upon acceleration into the intake at a
point towards the engine intake ports remote
from the point of introduction of main fuel.
55
13. The hereindescribed process of supplying
auxiliary fuel for engine acceleration Which com
'10. The hereindescribed process of supplying
auxiliary fuel for engine acceleration which com
prises effecting the delivery of fuel from a main
supply into and the discharge thereof from a re
ceptacle adjunctively to throttling, a limited
60 quantity of fuel being delivered to the receptacle
which is available immediately upon acceleration,
and. the fuel from the receptacle being discharged
by gravity independently of the main fuel supply
into the intake at a point towards the engine in
65 take ports remote form the point of introduction
of the main fuel.
11. The hereindescribed process of supplying
towards the engine intake ports relatively remote
from the point of introduction of the main fuel
so that the charge enters the cylinders substan
tially without lag in the fuel supply relative to the
air supply.
55
17. A charge forming device for internal com
bustion engines comprising a mixture passage
adapted to supply a mixture of fuel and air to
the intake ports of said engine, means for supply
ing fuel and air thereto, a throttle controlling the 60
flow therethrough, a main fuel reservoir, and an
auxiliary fuel reservoir in communication with
the main fuel reservoir, said auxiliary fuel reser
voir having means of communication with the
mixture passage at a point sufficiently close to 5
the engine intake ports to supply fuel thereto
during the acceleration period substantially with
receptacle adjunctively to throttling, and dis
out lag of the fuel supply relative to the air sup
ply, and throttle operated means for controlling
the passage of fuel relative to the auxiliary reser
charging the fuel from said receptacle upon ac
V011‘.
auxiliary fuel for engine acceleration which com
prises delivering fuel from a main supply into a
celeration by gravity flow into the intake rela
tively remote from the point of introduction of
main fuel, where it can enter the cylinders with
75 out lag.
18. A charge forming device for internal com
bustion engines comprising a mixture passage
adapted to supply a mixture of fuel and air to
the intake ports of said engine, means for supply- 75
6
2,023,817
‘ ing fuel and air thereto, a throttle controlling
the flow therethrough, a main fuel reservoir, an
atmospherically vented auxiliary fuel reservoir in
communication with the main fuel reservoir, said
auxiliary fuel reservoir having a restricted means
of communication with the mixture passage at a
point su?iciently close to the engine intake ports
to supply fuel thereto during the period of accel
eration substantially without lag of the fuel sup
10 ply relative to the air supply, and means operated
by the throttle for supplying fuel to said auxiliary
reservoir.
19. A charge forming device for internal com
bustion engines comprising an intake conduit, a
15 main carburetor, a main fuel receptacle for sup
plying fuel to the carburetor, a throttle in said in
take conduit, an auxiliary fuel receptacle supplied
With fuel from said main receptacle, and com
municating with the intake conduit for supply
open position of said throttle and again at a wide
open position thereof.
24. A device for supplying supplemental fuel
to the intake conduit of an internal combustion
engine comprising means for conveying fuel 5
thereto, a valve for controlling said means, an
actuating member having means for actuating
said valve at an interval diu‘ing movement of said
actuating member in one direction, and means
for rendering said actuating member inopera- 10
tive to actuate said valve from normal position
upon return movement of said actuating member,
whereby to permit of said valve being retained
in normal position against actuation during said
last mentioned movement.
15
25. A device for supplying supplemental fuel
to the intake conduit of an internal combustion
engine comprising means for conveying said fuel
thereto, a valve controlling said means, an actu
20 ing fuel thereto by gravity, and throttle actuated
ating member having a plurality of means 00- 20
means for controlling the passage of fuel into
and from said auxiliary receptacle.
20. The combination with an intake conduit,
carburetor and throttle of an internal combus
ordinated to actuate said valve at intervals upon
movement of said actuating member in one di
rection, and means for rendering said coordinated
means inoperative upon the return movement of
said actuating member to permit of said valve 25
25
tion engine, means in communication with a
continuously available source of fuel supply for
supplying supplemental fuel to the intake, a nor
mally closed valve at the discharge side of said
supplying means, means operated mechanically
by the throttle for opening said valve upon open
ing movement of the throttle, and interposed
means for rendering said actuating means in
eifective during throttle closing movement to re
tain said valve open.
35
21. The combination with the intake conduit,
carburetor and throttle of an internal combus
tion engine, of supplementing fuel supplying
means for discharging fuel into the intake, means
for controlling the discharge of fuel therefrom,
40 means for actuating said controlling means ad
junctively to opening of the throttle, and thrust
receiving means interposed between the actuat
ing and actuated means and adapted to yield
under the action of the actuating means upon
15 closing movement of the throttle to permit of
said controlling means being retained in posi
tion to prevent supplementary fuel discharge sub
stantially during any closing movement of the
throttle.
22. The combination with the intake conduit
and the throttle of an internal combustion en
gine, of means for conveying supplemental fuel to
said intake conduit, a valve for controlling said
means, means operated adjunctively with the
55 operation of the throttle and having a portion
for actuating said valve at an interval during
opening movement of the throttle and means
interposed between said valve and said actuating
means and receiving the thrust of said portion,
60 said interposed means being effective unidirec
tionally for rendering said actuating means in
operative to actuate said valve by engagement of
said portion with said interposed means during
50
65
closing movement of the throttle, whereby to
permit of said valve being retained in normal
position against actuation during said closing
movement.
23. The combination with the intake conduit
70 and the throttle of an internal combustion en
gine, of means for conveying supplemental fuel
to said intake conduit, a valve for controlling said
means, and means operated adjunctively with the
operation of said throttle, and including parts
75, coordinated to actuate said valve at a partially
being retained in normal position against actua
illOll during said return movement.
26. A device for supplying supplemental fuel to
the intake conduit of an internal combustion en
gine comprising means for conveying said fuel 30
thereto, a valve for controlling the discharge of
fuel from said means, means for retaining said
valve normally in one position, a movable mem
ber having a slotted portion, a member yieldably
disposed in said slotted portion, a connection 35 1
between said movable member and said valve,
and an actuating member having a nib thereon
adapted to be moved in one direction over said
yieldable member in operative relation thereto
for actuating said valve, and in the opposite di- 40
rection relative to said yieldable member in in
operative relation thereto for permitting of said
valve being retained in normal position against
actuation by said nib upon the last mentioned
movement thereof.
45
27. A device for supplying supplemental fuel
to the intake conduit of an internal combustion
engine comprising means for conveying said fuel
thereto, valves for controlling the passage of
said fuel' therethrough, springs for said valves, 50
a member extending transversely of and con
nected to the outer portion of said valves, a
pivoted member having arms provided with slots,
a connection between the said members, a roller
disposed in said slots and tending to rest at one 55
end thereof, and a rotatable member having a
nib adapted to be moved in one direction over
said roller in operative relation thereto for actu
ating said valves, and in the opposite direction
relative to said roller in inoperative relation 60
thereto for permitting of said valves being re
tained in position against actuation by said nib
upon the last mentioned movement thereof.
28. A device for supplying supplemental fuel
to the intake conduit of an internal combustion 65
engine comprising a fuel receptacle, inlet and
outlet valves for controlling the passage of fuel
to and from said receptacle; said inlet valve being
normally retained in open position and said out
let valve being normally retained in closed posi- 70
tion, a movable member having a slotted portion,
a connection between said member and said
valves, a member yieldably disposed in said slotted
portion and tending to rest at one end thereof,
and a movable member having a cam nib adapted 75
7
2,023,817 ,
to be moved in one direction over said yieldable
member in operative relation thereto for actuat
ative relation thereto for actuating said valves
ing said valves to move the same from the normal
positions thereof, and in the opposite direction
relative to said roller in inoperative relation
thereto for permitting of said valves being re- 5
tained in the normal positions thereof against
positions thereof, and in the opposite direction
relative to said yieldable member in inoperative
relation thereto for permitting of said valves
being retained in the normal positions thereof
against actuation by said nib upon the last men
tioned movement thereof.
29. A device for supplying supplemental fuel to
10
an intake conduit of an internal combustion en
gine comprising a fuel receptacle, substantially
parallel inlet and outlet needle valves for con
trolling the passage of fuel to and from said
15 receptacle, springs acting on said valves and
serving respectively to retain said inlet valve
normally in open position and said outlet valve
normally in closed position; the spring for said
outlet valve being stronger than the spring for
said inlet valve, a member pivotally connected at
one end to said inlet valve and at an inter
mediate position to said outlet valve at corre
sponding ends thereof, and serving to effect the
closing of said inlet valve prior to the opening of
25 said outlet valve, a member pivoted at one end
and having arms provided with slots, a connec
tion between the free ends of said pivoted mem
bers, a roller disposed in said slots and tending to
rest at one end thereof, and a rotatable member
30 having exposed cam nibs thereon adapted to be
moved in one direction over said roller in oper
at intervals to move the same from the normal
actuation by said nibs upon the last mentioned
movement thereof.
30. The combination with the intake conduit,
carburetor and throttle of an internal combus- 10
tion engine, of a source of auxiliary fuel, and
controlling means therefor interconnected with
the throttle to supply auxiliary fuel to the intake
conduit upon opening movement of the throttle
and means for rendering the controlling means 15
inoperative for supplying fuel upon closing move- '
ment of the throttle.
'
31. The combination with the intake conduit,
carburetor and throttle of an internal combus
tion engine, of an auxiliary fuel outlet in the intake 20
conduit over the throttle, a member containing a
fuel chamber higher than said fuel outlet and
adapted to deliver fuel thereto by gravity, a
source of fuel supply for said chamber, and valves
for regulating the supply of fuel to and delivery 25
of fuel from said chamber, said valves being inter
connected with one another and with the throttle
so that while both may be controlled at the same
operation, only one thereof can be open at a.
time.
80
ARLINGTON MOORE.
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