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Патент USA US2025708

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Dec. 31, 1935.
2,025,708
H. _K. BAKER
METAL STRUCTURE
Filed Sept. 12, 1931
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
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INVENTOR
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Dec. 31, 1935.
H, K_ BAKER
2,025,708
METAL STRUCTURE
Filed Sept. 12, 1951
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2 She'ets-Sheet 2
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INVENTOR
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Patented Dec. 31, 1935
2,025,708
UNITED STATES PATENT- OFFICE
2,025,708
IMETAL STRUCTURE
Herbert K. Baker, Detroit, Mich.
Application September 12, 1931, Serial No. 562,580
10 Claims. (Cl. 72-117)
This invention relates to improvements in ex
panded metal structures and methods. in making
same.
The particular object of my invention is to
provide an expanded metal fabric light in weight
per unit of area, possessing greater rigidity than
heretofore provided in expanded metal fabrics
of the kind depending entirely upon their strand
structure for sti?ness of the ?nished sheet. On
account of economy in weight, this type of ex
panded metal is used extensively as a plaster
base. Present fabrics of this kind when made
andv used as metal lathing lack rigidity and re
quire closer spacing of the supporting members
to which the fabric is attached, than otherwise
tained in the ?nished fabric as will be readily
understood in accompanying drawings and fol-_
lowing speci?cations.
Figure 1 is a face view of a fragment of a fabric
embodying the improvements of my invention;
Figure 2 is a view of a fragment of a previously 01
slitted blank showing the arrangement of the
slits and strand interconnecting bonds, from
which the fabric in Figure 1 is expanded;
Figure 3 is a face view of a fragment of an- 10
other fabric embodying my invention with modi?
cations over the fabric shown in Figure 1;
Figure 4 is a view of a fragment of- a previously
slitted blank showing the arrangement of the
slits and strand interconnecting bonds, from 15
which the fabric shown in Figure 3 is expanded,
would be necessary.
The expanded metal structure embodying my
invention is adaptable to the same procedure‘ including the modi?cations shown in Figure 4a.
Figure 4a. is a View of a fragment of a previin manufacturing with modi?cations, as the type
20 of fabric formed by operating upon a previously ously slitted blank with slightly modi?ed ar
of the bonds over the blank in Fig
slitted sheet, to bend or de?ect the strands to rangement
ure 4;
produce the open diamond mesh, the bent strands
Figure 5 is a view of a portion of a previously
extending diagonally of the sheet in opposite di—
slitted blank ' being progressively expanded,
rections and being connected at their intersec
starting at a point well within from the outside
tions by bonds or bridges disposed in rows ex
tending transversely of the sheet. As is well longitudinal edges of the slitted blank and ex
progressively outward in opposite di
known in the art, these bonds or bridges by rea , panding
verging lines to the longitudinal edges of the
son of their double or greater width than the
strands when disposed substantially edgewise to
the sheet, imparts the stiffening factor to the fab
ric. Spacing these bonds closer together in
creases the rigidity of the sheet. To space these
bonds closer together in the present expanded
metal fabric mentioned above, requires the open
ings to be further reduced in size, therefore in
creasing the number of strands, area and weight
of the blank as well as unit weight of the ?nished
sheet, or further decrease the width of the
strands to the extent of impracticability in main
taining economy of weight in the ?nished sheet.
In my improved expanded metal structure, the
bonds and strands are arranged so that strand
interconnecting bonds are not only spaced closer
together across the sheet but are aligned in sub
stantially edgewise relation to the plane of the
sheet in such a manner to distribute any strains
(causing ?exing when handling or sagging when
being plastered on) over a greater area of mesh
structure, thereby resisting such strains more
satisfactorily than the present expanded metal
fabrics of this type.
Although the arrangement of strands and
bonds in the expanded metal fabrics embodying
my invention permits closer spacing of the bonds
across the sheet, economy in weight is main
slitted blank, producing the expanded metal
structure embodying my invention;
>
' '
Figure 6 is a view of a portion of the slitted
blank being progressively expanded by starting
from one outside longitudinaledge expanding
progressively in a diagonal line to the opposite
longitudinal edge of the slitted blank, producing
the expanded metal structure embodying my in:
vention;
'
'1
Figure 7 is a diagonal cross section on line 1-1
of Figure 1, and
Figure 8 is a similar section on line'8—8‘of
Figure l.
40_
The arrows in Figures 5 and 6 indicate the di
rection of the movement of the slitted blank as
the said blanks are being progressively expanded.
To produce the expanded metal structure as
embodied in my invention, slits uniform in length 45
are formed in the blank by an arrangement to
position the strand interconnecting bonds B (see
Fig. 2) so that any one bond is spaced an unequal
distance apartvbetween any pair of bonds in the
adjacent row of longitudinally alined bonds there
by producing the alternate relatively short and
long strands A and C respectively (see Fig. 2).
The blank with the slits so formed is expanded
or opened into a mesh-work structure so that said
bonds are substantially alined with the relatively 55
2
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2,025,708
shorter strands A extending diagonally of the‘
sheet, the relatively longer strands C being in
somewhat staggered relation inclined in the op
posite direction diagonally of the sheet (see
tend the full distance between pairs of parallel
strands Al extending in the opposite diagonal
Fig. 1).
3 and 4a).
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'
The expanded metal structure embodying this
invention is further modi?ed (see Fig. 3) by form
ing slits in the blank in an arrangement whereby
the strand interconnecting bond Bl (see Figs. 4
10. and 4a) are either lengthened or positioned so
that the bonds in any row of bonds extending
lengthwise of the slitted blank join, abut or par
tially overlap the bonds in the adjacent row of
longitudinally alined bonds. The blank with the
15 slits and the bonds so arranged is expanded into
meshwork~ whereby bonds Bl extend in lines
diagonally of the sheet and the strands AI in;
cline away from said bonds in the opposite direc
tion diagonally of the sheet. ‘In this arrange
20 ment of slits and bonds (see Figs. 4 and 4a) said
bonds Bl may also be regarded as strands of
double or greater width than strands Al.
Referring to Fig. 4a, the bonds Bl in rows ex
tending lengthwise of the slitted blank are ar
25 ranged to overlap said bonds in the adjacent
rows, for the length of said overlap at B2 the
combined width of bonds is three times the width
_ of strands AI. In this arrangement the bonds Bl
may also be regarded as strands being of double
or greater width than strands Al, the‘ overlap
of said bonds B2 then becomes a bond connecting
strands'Al and BI.
_
As will be noted in Figures 1 and 3 the bonds
and strands in the ?nished sheet are disposed
edgewise and substantially perpendicularly to the
35
' plane of the sheet.
In this invention the close coupling of the
‘ bonds in a series of bonds and their alignment in
edgewise relation extending diagonally of the
40 sheet, materially increases the e?‘lciency of the
bonds in imparting rigidity to the meshwork struc
ture, as a greater-number of bonds cooperatively
act to distribute the bending stresses when .the
sheet is under load to a greater area of meshwork
45 'structure than in present forms of expanded
metal fabrics mentioned herein. As the bonds in
these structures are generally of independent
alignment and coupled in offset relation with the
' strands extending diagonally of the sheetrin op-,
50 posite directions which tends to restrict the bonds
‘ in cooperatively acting to distribute the bending
stresses as the bonds are offset from alignment
with the strands carrying the stresses.
- In my improved meshwork structure formed
55 of relatively long and short strands being con
nected by bonds, the said combined bonds and
short strands extending in‘lines diagonally of the
sheet form borders for two sides of the open
ings D (see Fig. l) and the longer strands ex
60
tending in the opposite diagonal direction form
ing the remaining borders of said openings. This
arrangement permits the closer coupling of the
bonds without further materially decreasing the
area of the meshwork openings or the width of
65 strands found in the present forms of this type
of expanded metal fabrics of the same weight be
ing accepted by the trade. Thereby rigidity is in
creased and economy of weight is maintained‘ in
my improved expanded metal structure.
The rigidity may further be increased by the
70
‘modi?cations (see Figs. 3, 4, and 4a) by extend
ing the length of the bonds in the slitted blank,
when expanded into meshwork the bonds Bl (see
Fig. 3) are formed in lines in edgewise relation
75 extending diagonally of the sheet, said bonds ex
direction. These bonds'may be arranged to even
overlap, this overlap is identi?ed by B2 (see Figs.
'
5
The expanded metal fabrics as. embodied in my
invention' may be slitted and expanded from
blanks ‘by any suitable means (not shown).
Methods of expanding a previously slitted blank
(see Fig. 2) is shown in Figures 5 and 6, the slit- 10
ted blanks as shown in Figures 4 and 4a may also
be expanded in the same manner.
Although certain comparisons are made herein
as to sizes of openings and width of strands with
present forms of expanded metal fabrics of this 15
type, it is understood however, the size of open
ings may be altered with corresponding changes
in the size of the bonds and strands to ful?ll
the needs of the trade without departing from
my invention.
_ —
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20
Although in describing my invention as an ex
panded metal fabric, light in weight, of increased
rigidity over similar types of fabric 'used for metal
lathing, it may also be employed in the making
of fabrics for reinforcing concrete, screening, etc. 25
As clearly shown in Figures 1, 3, 5, and .6 the
angle of divergence between the short or bonded
strands and the longitudinal axis of the sheet is
limited to approximately 30°. This produces the
important effect of greatly increasing the longi- 30
tudinal rigidity of the expanded sheet, as the
short strands which include the bonds extend in
continuity through a considerable portion of the
length of the sheet. As a consequence it is not
necessary to produce any ribs or other reinforcee 35
ment longitudinally of the sheet as rigidity is
obtained by the same construction of meshnwork
throughout the length and breadth of the sheet.
What I claim as my invention is:
_
1. An expanded» metal fabric comprising a 40
meshwork of strands and bonds, a bond through
out its length being of a width of a plurality of
strands andysaid meshwork including a series of
said bonds in continuity and substantially in
edgewise relation'to the plane of the sheet and 15
strands extending transversely from said bonds.
2. An expanded metal fabric comprising a
meshwork of strands and bonds including plu- '
ralities of bonds arranged to form continuities of
relatively wide strands extending diagonally of 50
the sheet and relatively narrow strands extended
transversely from said wide strands.
3. An expanded metal fabric comprising a
mesh work of strands and unslitted strips, saidv
unslitted strips extending continuously diago- 55
nally of the expanded sheet and parallel to each
other and strands extending transversely between
said unslitted strips.
.
4. An expanded metal fabric comprising a
mesh work of strands and unslitted strips, said 60
unslitted strips being in substantially edgewise
relation to the plane of the sheet and extending.
diagonally thereof and strands inclining away
from and extending between said unslitted strips. ,
_5. An expanded ‘metal fabric comprising a 65
meshwork of strands and bonds the strands being '
of substantially equal width, a bond throughout
its length being of a width which is an even mul
tiple of strand widths and a series of said bonds
extending in uninterrupted continuity with 70
strands extending transversely from said bonds.
6. An expanded metal fabric comprising a_
meshwork of strands and bonds including a series
of bonds arranged to form an uninterrupted con
tinuity of relatively wide strands extending diag- 75
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2,025,708
onally of the sheet between rows of relatively
9. An expanded metal open mesh fabric such
narrow strands inclining in one direction away
as can be formed from, a blank slitted parallel
from said wide strands on each side thereof and
to the side edges thereof to form a series 0!
strands, and bonds‘ between adjacent strands
continuous with each other, said bonds and
strands in the expanded sheet extending diago
nally thereof, the bonds forming a continuous
bar of a width equal to a multiple of strands.
10._ An expanded metal open mesh fabric such
as can be formed from a blank slitted longitudi
nally thereof to form parallel strands, leaving un
to the plane of the sheet. -
‘
..
_'I. An expanded open mesh metal fabric formed
from a slitted blank with bonds between strands
on opposite sides of the slits continuous with each
‘other the entire width of the sheet, said bonds
forming two sides of each open mesh and said
10 strands forming the other two sides.
8. An expanded metal open mesh fabric such
as can be formed from a sheet slitted parallel to
the side edges thereof to form a series of strands,
and bonds between strands continuous with each.
15 other, said bonds and strands in the expanded
sheet extending diagonally thereof and trans
versely to each other.
slitted strips extending diagonally of the blank
and the direction of the slits, 'said strands and
unslitted strips in the expanded sheet extending
diagonally thereof and transversely to each other. '
HERBERT K. BAKER.
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