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Патент USA US2040603

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May 129
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I.
W. D. GLADSTQNE
HAMMER FOR PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
Filed May 25, 1935
INVENTOR.
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4i;
-
ATTORNEY.
2,040,603
Patented May 12, 1936
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE‘
2,040,603
HAMMER FOR PERCUSSION MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
William D. Gladstone, New York, N. Y.
Application May 25, 1935, Serial No. 23,422
3 Claims.
(Cl. 84—422)
The device of my invention relates to hammers
for percussion musical instruments and is particu
larly adapted for use with percussion musical
instruments in which the tonal elements are of
5
separated members.
- The production of musical composition from
percussion musical instruments in which the tonal
elements are separated, as in xylophones, chimes
and similar instruments, is accomplished. by strik
10 ing the tonal elements by means of so-called
“hammers” which consist of a hammer member,
or head, carried by a ?exible and resilient handle.
As the tonal elements are frequently struck
with great rapidity, it is necessary that the handle
15 have suf?cient resiliency to return the hammer
to its original position after its ?exing due to its
percussion with the tonal element.
This is the most important element of per
cussion hammers, because if the handle is still
20 returning to its original position when the fol
lowing tonal element is struck, the produced tone
will be imperfect.
Further, as the musician always employs two
hammers be hollow and made of resilient and
?exible material, the devices have all of the de
scribed advantages and that, therefore, they are
a great improvement and have many valuable
advantages over the present known devices nd
are capable of greatly improved and more desir
15
able tonal effects.
Without limiting myself to any particular re
silient and, ?exible material, I ?nd that vul
canized rubber and synthetic resin compositions
are particularly suitable for my purpose.
While I have referred particularly to the em 20
ployment of my devices with percussion musical
instruments in which the tonal elements are sepa
and resiliency as otherwise the tone effects will
rated from'each other, I do not limit myself to
such use as they may be equally advantageously
employed with drums and similar musical in 25
struments, in any case where it is desirable to have
be irregular and imperfect.
both resiliency and ?exibility.
or more hammers at the same time, it is essential
25 that all of the handles have the same ?exibility
During the production of a musical composi
tion upon a percussion musical instrument, the
musician frequently ?nds it necessary to rapidly
change his hammers, dependent upon the hard
ness of the hammer head, in order to obtain the
proper tonal e?ects and hence it is desirable that
the hammers should carry some clearly de?ned
35
constant resiliency and suf?cient strength to pre
vent their breakage during use.
Further, the modi?ed forms of my device
possess readily recognized insignia indicating
tonal values and means for preventing the handle
from slipping through the hand of the performer
in addition to the advantages above mentioned.
I have found that if the handles of percussion
and rapidly recognizable insignia indicating the
desired device. ‘
The advantages of my percussion hammers will
be evident upon a consideration of my ‘speci?ca
tion and its accompanying drawing in which 30
similar parts are designated by similar numerals.
In the accompanying drawing Figure 1 is a‘ side
view of one form of my device, partly broken away
for purposes of explanation.
Figure 2 is a top view of the device of Figure 1. 35
Figure 3 is a bottom view of the device of Fig
Further, because of the force of the blow of
the hammer head necessary in the production of
some musical compositions it is desirable that
40 the handle portion be of such strength that it
will not break under such percussions.
The handles of the percussion hammers now
employed are made» of rattan, but these possess
many disadvantages among which may be men
45 tioned their-non-uniformity and non-rapidity of
ure 1.
resiliency, their property of remaining bent in
stead of returning to a straight position, their
loss of resiliency and ?exibility during use and
their brittleness resulting in their being fre
50 quently broken during use.
ure 5.
The percussion hammers of my invention over
come all of the above mentioned and other ob
jectionable features of the present employed de
vices, and present percussion hammers having
55 uniform and. constant ?exibility, uniform and
Figure 4 is an enlarged section through the line
4-4 of Figure 1.
Figure 5 is a side view of a modi?ed form of 40
my device showing its ?exibility.
Figure 6 is a top view of the device of Figure 5.
Figure '7 is an enlarged section through the
line 'l--'| of Figure 5.
Figure 8 is a bottom view of the device of Fig 45
The particular form of the device of my inven
tion shown in Figures 1 to 4 consists of a resilient
and ?exible hard rubber tubular member I 0, pref
erably vulcanized upon both the inner and outer 50
faces, the lower end of which extends into and is
?xedly attached to a spherical knob member I I,
which acts to prevent the handle from slipping
through the hand of the user.
The upper end of the tubular member H] ex 55
2.
2,040,603
tends through and is ?xedly attached to the
spherical striking, or hammer, member [2 com
posed of soft rubber, and a plug I3 is inserted
within and is ?xedly attached to the tubular mem
ber l0. '
The plug l3 carries a designating insignia as
the numeral 5, and the spherical member H car
ries a similar designating insignia as the nu
meral 5.
The modi?ed form of my device shown in
Figures 5 to 8, consists of a resilient and flexible
synthetic resin hollow cylindrical member [4,
the lower end of which is inserted within and
?xedly attached to a spherical knob member l5,
15 and the upper end of which passes through the
spherical striking, or hammer, member IS.
The spherical member l5 and the hammer end
I6 carry a designating insignia as a red color IT.
The ?exibility of the device of Figures 5 to 8 is
20 shown by the dot and dash lines of Figure 5,
the resiliency of the hollow cylindrical member
I4 bringing the device to its original position as
shown by the full lines of that ?gure.
The hammer element of my device may be com
25
posed of wood, metal, felt, synthetic resin, cellu
loid, Pyroline, bone or other suitable material,
but I prefer to employ semi-soft rubber, the soft
ness being adapted for the particular purpose for
which it is intended, and which may be softer
30 or harder in different hammers, dependent upon
the tonal effects desired.
The designating insignia may be of any char
acter which will designate the particular ham
mer possessing a desired physical character, and
the spherical member at the lower end of my de
vice may be omitted if desired.
It will thus be seen that my device possesses
the property of greater assurance of the produc
tion of proper tones, more uniform tonal results,
more uniform ?exibility and resiliency and great
er stability than the percussion hammers pre 10
viously employed.
I do not limit myself to the particular size,
shape, number, arrangement or material of parts
speci?cally shown and described as these are given
simply as a. means for clearly describing the de— 15
vice of my invention.
What I claim is:—
1. In a hammer adapted for use with percussion
musical instruments in combination, a hollow
resilient and ?exible plastic composition handle 20
and a hammer head carried by one end thereof.
2. In a hammer adapted for use with percussion
musical instruments, in combination, a hollow
synthetic resin resilient handle and a hammer
head carried by one end thereof.
3. In a hammer adapted for use with percussion
musical instruments, in combination, a hollow
hard rubber resilient handle and a hammer head
carried by one end thereof.
30
WILLIAM D. GLADSTONE.
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