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Патент USA US2044023

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‘mum w, wm
R', s, TRQTT
294mm
ENGINE MOUNTING
Filed July 13, 1932
3 Sheets-Sheet l
June H6, 3935.
R. s. TROTT
z?M'?m
ENGINE MOUNTING
Filed July 15, .1932
3 Shqets-Sheet 2
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5%
June 16, 1936.
R. s. TROTT
2,@44,®23
ENGINE MOUNTING
Filed July 13, 1932
3 Sheets-Sheet 3
Patented June 16, 1936
2,044,023
vlJNlTED STATES PATET OFFICE
2,044,023
ENGINE MOUNTING
Rolland S. Trott, Denver, Colo.
Application July 13, 1932, Serial No. 622,330
6 Claims. (Cl. 248-7)
My invention relates to engine mountings for
construction adapted for factory production.
ports.
Figure 11 is a fragmentary plan view of one
form of my front and rear mountings and with
one torque connection all assembled with a power 5
plant and its supporting frame.
In the drawings the cradle I is attached to the
engine 2 by the cap screws 3 or in any other
proper manner. The pillow bracket 4 has a ?nger
i” projecting into a hole 5 of the frame cross 10
member 6 holding it in place and is attached to
the frame cross member 6 by the bolts 1, nuts 8
and lock washers 9, or in any other proper man
ner. The rubber member I0 partially supports
the cradle l and rests upon and is supported by 15
the cross member 6.
The object of t‘m's invention is to provide an
engine mounting of an improved construction for
supporting an engine unit upon its frame or sup
port and. for providing resiliently opposed sub
stantially pivotal movement of the engine unit
about an axis of oscillation combined with other
movements tending to cushion the forces that
would be transmitted to the frame or support due
to the operation of the engine.
A further object is to provide a mounting for
the front of the engine unit in which the cushion
ing movements will vary the pressures upon the
frame or support as little as possible.
A further object is to provide such a mounting
for an engine unit having a front mounting which
may be constructed as a unit assembly that is at
tachable to the engine unit and to its frame or
member 6 to position the rubber member ID. The 20
support.
upper face of the rubber member ID and the co- ‘
A further object is to provide such a front
mounting which with little change may be ac
commodated for production as a factory built
from the center l2 with the radius R. The best
vertical position of the point l2 may be deter
part1 of the vehicle, or as an accessory to be at
mined by test for any special case or may be 10- 25
tached to the vehicle subsequent to its manu
facture.
All of the above is fully described below and is
illustrated in the drawings, in which:
Figure 1 is a front elevation in partial section
of one form of front mounting, a portion of the
cated according to the judgment of the designer.
The point l 2 is offset horizontally from the
engine unit, and a section of the front cross mem
ber and the‘ side frame members of an automo
bile.
35
Figure 2 is a fragmentary section on the line
2--2 of Figure 1.
Figure 3 is a plan view of Figure 1.
Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional View show
ing one form of the accessory compound resilient
40 front mounting construction.
Figure 5 is similar to Figure 4 except that it is
adapted to factory production.
4:5
Figure 10 is a view of a modi?ed form of torque
mounting engine units upon their frames or sup
Figure 6 is a fragmentary detail of a front
mounting construction that may be used either
as an accessory or in factory production.
Figure 7 is an elevation and partial section of
one form of the torque bracket, resilient torque
reaction transmitting means, a portion of the
50 engine unit and a section of one frame side mem
ber.
Figure 8 is a plan view of Figure '7 with the
engine and frame removed.
Figure 9 is a view of a modi?ed form of the
55 front mounting construction.
The wall ll of the pillow 4 contacts with the
rubber member IE! on three sides and combines
with the rear wall 6’ (see Figure 2) of the cross
acting face of the cradle l are on arcs struck
center line of the engine unit an amount B such
that the axis through the point I2 and through
the pivot point of the rear mounting is central 30
with respect to the Weight of the engine unit.
The springs l3 are centered on the pillow 4 by
the circular upwardly extending centers l4 and
are centered on the cradle l by the hubs l5. The I
springs l3 are so positioned that their axes will 35
intersect at or adjacent the point I 2. The rubber
conical washers [6 rest in the centers l4 and re
ceive the conical heads of the rivets IT. The
rubber Washers l8 rest in depressions in the
cradle l and contact the washers l9 which'are 40
held upon the rivets l‘! by the rivet heads 20.
By this construction, the front of the engine
unit is supported both by the two springs l3 and
by the rubber member ID in such a manner that
the engine unit may have substantially pivotal 45
movement about an axis at or adjacent the point
l2. Any other method of mounting the cradle
upon the engine unit may be employed, or the
cradle may if desired be made integral with any
part of the front of the engine unit.
50
Any other method of forming the pillow or of
attaching it to the frame may be employed, or
the pillow 4 may if desired be made integral with
the frame cross member 6. Any other method of
locating and, retaining the rubber member I0 55
2
2,044,023
may be employed or under proper conditions the
rubber member I0 may be vulcanized to one or
more of the contacting parts. Any other method
of construction for limiting the maximum elon
gation of the springs I3 other than the rivet con
struction shown may be employed if desired.
Any and all of the above-mentioned variations,
however, should be such as not to seriously affect
the results and performance of the mounting.
10
The main reasons for the combined spring and
rubber construction for supporting the front of
the engine unit are as follows: It is difficult to
provide a rubber mounting of the same low rate
of de?ection and delicacy of resilience that can
15 be provided by springs.
'
On the other hand, springs, though they may
provide the desired low rate of de?ection per inch,
are in general incapable of resiliently and silently
stopping the movement after it has exceeded the
20 desired but slight amount. The combination of
the rubber and the two springs, while providing
the desired substantially pivotal movement, pro
vides a rate of deflection much lower than the
rubber alone could provide and provides a limi
25 tation of the movement that is in general not
possible by the springs alone without impact.
If the springs were positioned so that their
axes did not intersect, close to the same results
might possibly be provided by proper supple
30 mentary charges but with a greater resulting
strain upon the material of the springs.
When rubber is suf?ciently loaded, its resilience
is much reduced. By the above construction, if
two-thirds of the weight of the front of the en
35 gine unit are taken by the two springs, one-third
only needs to be taken by the rubber, which light
loading will make the rubber a much more resil
ient member. The proportion of weight carried
by springs and rubber is, of course, subject to a
40 Wide range to ?t the conditions and requirements
of any case and the above ?gures wherein the
springs carry two-thirds and the rubber carries
one-third of the total weight was merely men
tioned as an illustration and need not be the
45 proportion used, except in certain cases, or as
desired.
It will be seen that the substantially pivotal
movement of the engine unit is provided by def
ormation of the rubber member I0,_by deforma
50 tion of the springs I3 and bydeformation of the
rubber washers I6 and I8.‘
The rubber washers I6 and IS, the rivets I1, and
the washers I9 combine to resiliently restrict the
upward rebound of the engine unit with respect
55 to the frame member 6. That is, the elongation
of the springs I3 is effectively and resiliently re
stricted without serious restriction of transverse,
vertical or horizontal movements or of pivotal
movements or of combined transverse and piv
60 otal movements.
Another important reason for the use of both
rubber ‘and metallic resilient means for sup
porting the front of the engine unit is that the
different periodicities of the rubber and of the
65 springs tend to permit the mounting to keep step
with the engine forces over a wider range than
either material alone would be able to do.
Another important reason for the employment
of both rubber and spring supporting means is
70 as fobll?owsz—The rubber member II} is centered
at the point I2; this, however, may be called the
high speeds. As the speed decreases, the pivot
point moves closer and closer to the rubber, and
at ten miles an hour is generally located some
place in the rubber itself.
The pivot point furnished by cooperating coiled
springs is much more nearly stationary. So the
use of the springs with the rubber tends to re
duce the amount of movement of the pivot point
toward the rubber as the speed is reduced.
In the case of an accessory that is installed
upon a vehicle after its original manufacture, this
front mounting may be held in place by the cap
screws 3, bolts ‘I, nuts 8 and washers 9 as shown
in Figure 1.
In case it is desired to use this mounting in the
original manufacture of the vehicle as shown in
Figure 5 the cradle I may be either attached to
or integral with the engine 2 and the rivet heads
20 may be replaced by castellated nuts 26’ se
cured by cotter pins. However, any other method '20
or construction by which excessive rebound of the "
engine unit from the frame and excessive elonga
tion of the springs I3 is prevented may be em
ployed, so long as the transverse cushioning and
pivoting movements of the mounting are not se 25
riously interfered with.
It will be seen in Figure 1 that locating the
springs I3 with the axes radial from the point I2
or a point adjacent thereto permits the springs I3
to resiliently oppose pivotal movement of the 30
engine unit about or adjacent the point I2 equally
in either direction and by deformation of the
springs in a direction substantially at right angles
to the load pressure they carry so that load and
torque produce different strains on the springs I3.
It will also be seen that the fit of the rubber
member ID in the recess provided for it in the
cradle I and within the walls II of the pillow 4
allows the rubber member ID to resiliently oppose
the pivotal movement of the engine unit about 40
the point I2 or a point adjacent thereto by
stresses di?erent from those due to the load car
ried by the member ID. Hence this front mount
ing construction not only carries the load of the
engine unit by the combined action of radially 45
located springs and rubber but also resiliently
opposes pivotal movement by the combined ac
tion of radially located springs and rubber in
directions substantially at right angles to the
directions of load pressures sustained.
It will be clear that changing the spread of the
springs I3 will vary the radius from the point I2
or a point adjacent thereto, whether the angle of
their axes is changed or not and hence the resil
ient opposition to the pivotal movement about >
the point I2 or a point adjacent thereto may be
changed by variation either of the spread or of
the angles of the springs I3, or both. This resist
ance may also be varied by change in the size
and in the design of the springs I3.
Variation in the resilient resistance of the rub
ber member ID to pivotal movement of the en
gine unit about the point I2 may be accomplished
as shown in Figure 9 by variation in the size, form
and consistency and radius of the rubber I0 and
by the provision of indents IA on the cradle I'
and indents I IA from the walls of the wall mem
ber 4A, which is attached to the frame member
6" by the bolts 1’, lock washers 8' and nuts 9'.
The indents IA and I I A may be used either with
As a matter of fact, I have
or without vulcanizing the rubber member If] to
one or both of the coacting members I' and 4A.
found by tests that the actual pivot point of a
rubber mounting changes with the speed of the
The wall member 4A and the indents HA may
if desired be made integral with the frame mem
theoretical center.
75 engine and reaches the theoretical point only at
ber B".
75
' 2,044,023
In the construction shown in Figure 9, the seats
I4A of the springs I3 are made integral with the
cross frame member 6", and the Wall member 4A,
to position the rubber member I0’, is attached to
the cross member 6" by the bolts 1’, nuts 8' and
lock washers 9’ or in any other proper manner.
This construction for several reasons may be bet
"3
over a wide range to suit requirements and con
ditions; and my mountings may be accommo
dated for either accessory or factory production.
In Figures 7 and 8 is shown a torque reaction
transmitting construction, one or more of which
ter adapted for factory production than that
may be employed, if desired, to resiliently resist
the substantially pivotal movement of the engine
unit in addition to the resistance supplied by the
shown in Figure 1.
10
In the construction shown in Figure 9 the elon
gation of the springs I3 is limited by the bolts
I1’ and the castellated nuts 20', these bolts and
nuts being used to secure the front of the engine
unit to the frame of the vehicle.
15
Any other proper construction for providing
the bene?ts of the combined resilient results of
front and the rear mountings.
The bracket 40 is secured to the engine unit
by the cap screws 4| and lock washers 42. The
springs 43 are held to the bracket 40 by the cups
44 and the rivet 45 or by any other proper con
struction. The springs 43 are held by the hori
zontal ?anges of the side frame member 46 under
a tension that will give the engine unit the desired
otal and transverse or orbital movements are
amount of resiliently opposed substantially piv
otal movement under normal running conditions.
The rubber members 41 located within the
thereby obtained.
springs 43 arev'adapted to contact the ?anges of
In Figure 4 the rubber member 48 in each
spring I3 is employed to replace the rubber mem
ber ID of the Figure 1 construction, the weight
distribution between the spring means and the
the frame member 46 so as to aid the springs 43
in resiliently resisting the said pivotal movement.
The length and consistency of the rubber mem
bers 4'! and the strength and length of the springs
43 are to be combined to provide the desired nor
mal ?oat of the engine unit while acting to re
siliently limit this ?oat without solid impact.
Thus the springs 43 and the rubber members 41
act together in absorbing engine torque in much
rubber and metal resilient means may be em
ployed as long as the required substantially piv
25 rubber means being as stated above or as de
sired. The member 48 rests upon the washer 48’.
The rivet I1 is centered by a close fit through a
hole in the rubber member 48, the rivet I? hav
ing ample clearance to avoid contact with the
30 cradle I and the pillow 4.
The construction shown in Figure 5 is similar
to that of Figure 4 except that the bolt [1’ and
castle nut 20’ are employed in place of the
rivet H.
35
The construction shown in Figure‘ 6 may be
used as an accessory construction as shown. The
cradle IB is secured to the engine 2 by the cap
screws 3 or in any other proper manner.
The
pillow 4B is attached to the frame member 6A
40 by the bolts 1” and 1A, lock washers 8” and
nuts 9".
The centering washer 8A is used to center the
bolt 7" in a hole already provided in the frame
member 6A. The rubber member 48 rests upon
45 the washer 48' and is centered within the spring
IS. The cup washer ISA has a hub which centers
it in the cradle IB. The cup Washer I8A rests
upon the rubber member 48 and the spring l3.
The rivet l'l, washer l9, rivet head 20 and rub
50 ber washers l6 are all similar to those in Figure 1.
The rubber washer l8’ has a reduced portion
which centers it in the cradle IB. As a variation
of this construction for factory production the
bolts 1A and 1" may be replaced by rivets, and
55 a hole as at 63 may be provided in the frame
member 6A, and the rivet I‘! may be replacedby
the bolt l1’ and the castle nut 20', as shown in
Figures 9 and 5, or in place of using the separate
65
5
the same manner as the rubber members It or
48 and the springs l3 of the front mounting
in providing not only pivotal movement but
orbital movement which is necessary for
proper cushioning of all forces incident to
act
the
the
the 35
operation of the engine.
In some cases the rubber members 41 may be
short enough to have clearance at one end as
shown in Figure 7 or may be so long as to require
considerable compression before being able to
pass in between the horizontal ?anges of the 40
frame 46.
Or but one, either the upper, or the lower rub
ber 41 may be used as desired, the aim in each
case being to‘ ?nd a combination of construc
tions and proportions to provide the results most 45
desired in any one case.
In Figure 10 is shown a torque construction
adapted for factory production in which the
bracket 40 is an integral part of the engine unit.
Cooperating with my front mounting structure 50
and spaced rearwardly of the ?ywheel and trans
mission is a rear mounting designated generally
by the numeral 2| in Figure 11 which may be of
the character set forth in my divisional applica
tion and in which said rear mounting is connect 55
ed with the housing for the universal joint and
has a supporting plate shown at 21 secured upon
the cross frame member 28 to support the rear
pillow member 4B it may be formed as a part
of the frame member 6A in somewhat the same
manner as shown in Figures 9 and 5. In this
case the assembling would be done by means of
the bolts l1’ and nuts 20’. In the case of the
Any other proper means and construction for
the resilient limitation of the pivotal movement
of the engine unit other than that shown in Fig
ures '7 and 8 and 10 may be employed to cooper
construction shown in Figure 6 the assembling is
done by means of the bolts 1A and 'l". The bolts
ate with the resilient opposition provided by the 65
1" may be spot welded or in any other proper
way secured against turning in the pillow mem
ber 43.
permitted by requirements and conditions, the
purely torque transmitting construction may be
It will thus be seen that by the proper design
and proportion of my front mounting not only
proper transverse or orbital movement may be
provided but also substantially pivotal movement
may be provided and the amount of resilient re
75 sistance to such pivotal movement may be varied
end portion of the unit.
>
front and rear mountings, or if desired and if
completely eliminated and the front and rear
mountings themselves alone depended upon to re~
siliently resist the substantially pivotal move
ment of the engine unit.
While I do not think this last construction is
capable of the nicety of results provided by the
combined mounting and torque construction it can
60
4
2,044,023
be employed where satisfaction can be given by
providing the major bene?ts of my mounting.
Having now described my invention, what I
claim as new and desire to protect by Letters
Patent is as follows:
1. A mounting for a portion of an engine unit
in combination with supported and supporting
members, said mounting comprising a coiled
spring carried by ‘the supporting member and
bearing against the supported member in sup
porting relation, and a weight-supporting non
metallic resilient member interposed between said
supporting and supported members, and perma
nent‘zy carrying a part of the weight of said sup
15 ported member, said non-metallic resilient mem
ber being enclosed within the coiled spring and
slightly spaced therefrom for free movement of
the coiled spring.
2. A mounting for a portion of an engine unit
in combination with supported and supporting
members, said mounting comprising a coiled
spring carried by the supporting member and
bearing against the supported member in sup
porting relation, a. weight-supporting non-metal
25 lic resilient member interposed between said sup
porting and supported members, and permanent
ly carrying a part of the weight of said supported
member, said non-metallic resilient member be
30 ing enclosed within the coiled spring and slight
ly spaced therefrom for free movement of the
coiled spring, a connecting member extending
through said non-metallic resilient member and
through the coiled spring and portions of the
35 supporting and supported members and having
heads at opposite ends thereof, and non-metal
lic resilient rebound means interposed between
at least one of said heads and adjacent facing
portion or portions of the supporting and/or sup
40 ported members.
3. A mounting for an end portion of an engine
unit in combination with supported and support
ing members, said mounting comprising a coiled
spring carried by the supporting member and
45 bearing against the supported member in sup
porting relation, and a weight-supporting non
metallic resilient member independent of said
50
spring and interposed between said supported
and supporting members and permanently carry
ing a part of the weight of said supported mem
her.
4. A mounting structure for an engine unit in
combination with a support, said mounting struc
ture comprising weight supporting coil springs
carried by the support and arranged with the
axes thereof converging approximately to an axis
of oscillation of the engine unit, and weight-sup
porting non-metallic resilient means carried by
the support and arranged between said coil
springs and bearing against a portion of the en
gine unit and carrying apart of the weight of
said engine unit.
5. A mounting for an end portion of an engine
unit in combination with supported and sup
porting members, said mounting comprising a
coiled spring carried by the supporting member
and bearing against the supported member in
supporting relation, a weight-supporting non
metallic resilient member independent of said~
spring and interposed between said supported and
supporting members and permanently carrying a
part of the weight of said supported member, a
connecting member extending through portions
of the supporting and supported members adja- -
cent said coiled spring and having heads at oppo
site ends thereof, and non-metallic resilient re
bound means interposed between the heads and
the adjacent facing portions of the supporting
and supported members.
6. A mounting structure for an engine unit in
combination with a support, said mounting struc
ture comprising weight supporting coil springs
carried by the support and arranged with the
axes thereof converging approximately to an axis
of oscillation of the engine unit, weight-support
ing non-metallic resilient means carried by the
support and arranged between said coil springs
and bearing against a portion of the engine unit
and carrying a part of the weight of said engine
unit, a connecting member extending through
each of said coil springs and through adjacent
portions of the supporting and supported mem
bers and having heads at opposite ends thereof,
and non-metallic resilient rebound means inter
45
posed between said heads and the adjacent fac
ing portions of the supporting and supported
members.
ROLLAND S. TROTT.
50
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