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Патент USA US2044909

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June 23, 1936.
2,044,909
C. R. KOVAR
KNITTED FABRIC GLOVE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURING THE SAME
Fi‘led Sept. 12, 1955
2 Sheets-Sheet l
75
.
1
2. I
3mm
2.52pm
June 23, 1936.
c. R. } KOVAR
2,044,909
KNITTED FABRIC GLOVE AND METHOD OFVMANUFACTURING THE SAME
' Filed Sept. 12, 1955
2 sneaks-sheet 2
Patented June 23, 1936
2,044,909
UNITED. STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,044,909
KNITTED FABRIC GLOVE AND METHOD OF
MANUFACTURING THE SAME
Charles R. Kova-r, Richmond Hill, N. Y., assignor
to Julius Kayser & Company, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Application September 12, 1935, Serial No. 40,207
4 Claims. (Cl. 2-459)
The invention generally relates to knitted cutting of the fabric and have a natural tendency
fabric gloves and the method of manufacturing to unravel, are positively locked to prevent the
occurrence of “runners” or dropstitches in the
the same, and more particularly pertains to im
provements in the seam structure of a cut and
5 sewed knitted fabric glove.
As is well known in the art, certain types of
gloves are manufactured from knitted fabric, the
glove blank being cut out of such fabric and then
sewed along the cut raw edges thereof. Hereto
10 fore, it has been customary to sew the glove at
its cut raw edges entirely by an overseaming
stitch alone, or entirely by a plain sewed stitch
alone, the two stitches never, to my knowledge,
having been used together for accomplishing the
15 objectives hereinafter set forth. Overseamed
gloves are more desirable than plain sewed gloves
because the Overseamed stitches not only cover
the raw edges of the cut fabric, but produce a
more desirable ornamental seam structure and,
further, plain sewed stitches leave the raw edges
exposed to be subjected to an unravelling effect
when the gloves are in use.
To add to the aesthetic value of the glove, the
overseamed stitching should be arranged as close
25 to the marginal edge of the cut fabric blank as
possible so as to produce a ?ne stitch formation
but, in ordinary practice, this is impossible in view
of the excessive strains to which the outer edges
of the cut loops of the knitted fabric are sub
30 ject in the use of the glove.
It is the primary object of the present inven
fabric of the cut and sewed glove and whereby a
neat ?nish is imparted to the united edges which 5
adds to the appearance of the completed glove,
thus assuring the salability and increasing the
commercial value of the article.
Other important objects and advantages of the
invention will be in part obvious and in part 10
pointed out hereinafter.
In order that the invention and its mode of
operation may be readily understood by‘ those
persons skilled in the art, I have, in the accom
panying drawings, and in the detailed description 15
based thereupon, set out a possible embodiment of
the same. In these drawings:
Figure 1 is a greatly magni?ed view of a por
tion of the fabric of a type utilized in a cut and
sewed glove.
20
Figure 2 is a composite View illustrating the
fabric cutouts adapted to be assembled to form
a glove.
l
Figure 3 is a face elevation of the ?nished glove.
Figure 4 is an exaggerated cross-section of a 25
portion of the glove at the sewed edges thereof.
Figure 5 is an enlarged elevation of a portion
of the fabric glove showing the seam uniting the
cut edges of the sewed gloves.
Having more particular reference to the draw- 30
ings, wherein like characters of reference will
tion to provide a seam structure whereby the
designate corresponding parts throughout, it will
above desired advantages are obtained, and the
enumerated objections overcome, this being ac
appear from Figure 1 that the fabric preferably
used in the manufacture of a glove according to
this invention is warp knitted from two sets of 35
warp threads, one set of threads identi?ed by the
reference character I being laid to knit rows of
35 complished by combining and associating plain
knit stitches and Overseamed stitches in a par
ticular co-relation.
A feature of the invention resides in providing
40 ufacture whereby the cut loops at the edge of
loops 2 extending diagonally across the body of
the fabric in one direction, the remaining set of
warp threads, designated by the reference char- 40
the cut glove blanks are bound together by the
interlooping and interconnecting of the cut loops
at the edges of the fabric by overseaming stitches
and by the interlooping and interconnecting of
45 rows of uncut loops adjacent thereto by plain
acter 3, being laid to knit rows of loops 4 ex-—
tending diagonally across the fabric in a direction
opposite to that of the rows of loops 2. In the
drawings, the threads I are plain and the threads
3 are cross-lined for the sake oflclarity in the 45
an improved seam structure and method of man
stitches, the plain stitches binding the cut edges
of the fabric together and taking practically the
entire strain created in the use of the glove,
whereas the overseamed stitches bind the cut
50 loops together to prevent unravelling, and ?nish
the raw edges of the cut blanks.
The invention also contemplates the provision
of a method of forming a seam for uniting the
raw cut edges of the fabric knitted gloves where
55 by the loosened loops, which are caused by the
‘representation.
The fabric, of course, may be
knitted in such a manner as to present any suit
able or desirable surface ?nish or ornamentation.
In Figure 2, there is shown a glove blank and
its accessories cut from the fabric, and adapted 60
to be sewed together for forming the ?nished
glove shown in Figure 3. The cut glove blank 5
is adapted to be folded upon itself along an imagi
nary medial line 6 whereby to bring together the
opposite raw out side edges 1 for uniting the 55
2
2,044,909
same and, in this manner, form the top body
portion 8 and the bottom body portion 9.
The ?nger section I!) of the glove is formed by
slitting and shaping one end of the top and bot
tom sections 8 and 9 of the glove blank 5 sub
stantially as shown in Figure 2, so that upon fold
ing the blank upon itself, there will be provided
pairs of ?nger covering extensions .vll united by
means of ?nger strips I2 also cut from the knit
ted fabric and adapted to be sewed at its opposite
cut edges I3 to the corresponding out edges 44
of the extensions l l. The bottom section 9 of the
glove blank 5 is further provided with -a thumb
opening I5, the raw cut edges l6 of ‘which are
adapted to be sewed to the .raw cut edges [1 of
a thumb section !8 capable-of being folded along
an imaginary line H; so that the opposite raw out
side edges 20 thereof maybe seamed together.
According to the present invention, the raw
cut edges 1, l3, I4, 16, H and 20 of the glove
blank and of its accessories are united in the
formation of the glove by a seam 2! consisting
of overseaming stitches 2-2 and plain sewed
stitches "23.
As will more clearly appear from Figures 4
and 5 of the drawings, the plain sewed stitches
23 are formed and positioned in paralleling rela
tion and in close proximity to the overseaming
stitches ‘22.
In this manner, it will be appre
30 ciated that the seam 2| is positively reinforced
because the plain sewed stitches 23 protect the
overseamed stitches 22 vby relieving the same of
the strains which they usually undergo in the use
of 1the gloves.
It eisrpointed out that the cutting of the glove
blank and parts to be associated therewith in the
manufacture of the ?nished glove severs certain
of the loops 2 and'?, and this creates a multiplicity
of loose ends‘, such as indicated at 24 in. Figure l
40 of the drawings. These loose ends ‘24, ‘which ap
pear at the raw edges '1, ‘l3, id, ‘i5, H, and 29,
subject the fabric to an unravelling action. By
following my improved method of seaming, the
cut loops-are bound and interlooped by the over
seaming stitches 22 which are, in turn, reinforced
and protected by the plain sewed stitches 23.
It ‘will be appreciated "that the combination of
overseaming stitches 22 and plain sewed stitches
23 allows the formation of ?ne overseamed
stitches which are reinforced and protected by
the plain sewed stitches since the latter are dis
posed ‘to absorb practically all the strain im
posed upon the seam 2| during ordinary wear
of the glove. In this manner, a pleasing appear
555 ance is imparted to the glove and, although ex
tremely ?ne, the overseaming stitches are pre
vented from becoming disconnected from the out
loops of the glove fabric and, accordingly, the
possibilities of running or unravelling stitches
are obviated. Furthermore, the cooperation and
co-relation of the overseaming stitches 22 and
plain sewed stitches 23 produce a more substan
tial seam for prolonging the period of use of the
glove.
Whereas I have described’a particular kind of
knitted fabric from ‘which a glove is made, it is
to be understood that any other suitable type of
cloth may be utilized; also, the embodying of
the invention shown and described is manifestly
capable of certain modi?cations and, accordingly,
I consider within the spirit of the invention those
modi?cations which come within the scope of
the subjoined claims.
'
What I-claimv is:
. 1. A glove v'cut ‘from knitted fabric to provide
a top body section, a bottom body section hav
ing a thumb opening cut therein, a thumb sec
tion adapted to be affixed to said bottom body
.section about said thumb opening, and ?nger sec
vtions extending from both the top section and the
bottom section as a continuation thereof, all of
said sections having cut raw edges; overseaming
stitches securing the cut raw edges of the top
body and ?nger sections thereof to the cut raw
edges of the bottom section and ?nger sections
extending therefrom and for securing the cut raw
edges of the thumb section to the cut raw edges
about said thumb opening, and plain sewed
stitches cooperating With said overseaming
stitches binding said edges together, said plain
sewed stitches being arranged ‘in close spaced re- “
latio-n with the out raw edges of the sections, and
said overseaming stitches binding together the
rows ‘of complete loops and rows of cut loops at
the edge of the fabric to the rows of complete,D
loops immediately adjacent said plain sewed
stitches.
2. The method of securing together the cut
raw edges of a knitted fabric glove blank which
consists in covering and binding the rows of cut
lcops‘at the marginal edges of the blank by over
seamed stitching, and interlocking and binding
the rows of complete loops adjacent said mar
ginal edges by plain sewed stitching.
3. The method of securing together the out
40
raw edges of a knitted fabric glove blank which
consists in covering and binding the rows of cut
loops at the marginal edges of the blank by
forming overseaming stitches about the marginal
edges of the blank and interlocking and bind-_
ing .the rows'of complete loops adjacent said mar
ginal edge by forming plain sewed stitches in
paralleling relation and in close proximity to the
overseaming stitches.
4. In a cut and sewed glove consisting of fabric .
blanks cut from knitted fabric and having at "
their marginal edges rows of severed loops caused
by the cutting of the fabric blanks, a seam for
said blank-sconsisting of overseaming stitches in
terlocking with andbinding together the severed ,
loops for preventing ravelling of the loops and
the formation of runs in the glove blanks and
for securing the cut edges of the fabric blanks
together, and plain hand sewed stitches arranged
inwardly from said overseaming stitches and se 460
curing together rows of complete loops immedi
ately adjacent said severed loops and cooperating
with said overseaming stitches to secure the cut
edges of the gloves together to further prevent
ravelling of the fabric blanks.
CHARLES R. KOVAR.
65
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