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Патент USA US2400924

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Mayzs, 1946.
TAPE FOR SLIDE FASTENERS
Filed Feb. 29, 1944
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2,400,924
J. E. FIITEJJR
'
Patented May 28, 1946
* 2,400,924
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,400,924
TAPE FOR suns FASTENERS
' John E. Fite, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa.
Application February 29, 1944, Serial No. 524,500
8 Claims.
This invention relates to slide fasteners, and
more particularly to the textile tapes employed
as the foundations thereof.
‘A. slide fastener normally includes a pair of
parallel foundation tapes. These tapes are com
posed of textile fabric and one edge of each of
the parallel strips is thickened, and thereby re
inforced. Usually this reinforcement consists of
a cord laid on each of the opposite faces of the
tape, and semi thereto by a row of stitches pass
ing through the two cords and the tape fabric. ‘
(01. 139-384)
y?bres, in that the tapes tend- to wrinkle or 'un-'
‘
dulate and become unsightly along the scoop-v "
bearing edges thereof. The undulations in ‘the
tapes interfere with the smooth ‘normal func
tioning of the slide in effecting engagement and
disengagement of the scoops.
.
‘
‘
Analysis indicates that the unsightly trouble
some wavy conditions which develop in slide
fasteners in the course of use arises from a
longitudinal shrinking of the foundation tapes.
This shrinkage causes the scoops to be drawn
into more closelyv spaced relation to each other.
edge thereof.
'
and the resultant reduction in the spacing of
Around the reinforced edges of the tapes are
the scoops requires the expenditure of greater
pinched, or otherwise set, the interlocking hook 15 effort in order to e?ect the interlocking action
and-keeper elements of the fasteners, which are
of the scoops, by the slide. This‘ causes the slide
commonly referred to in the trade as “scoops.”
to work with a jerky action.
These scoops arecomposed of metal, plastic or
The reduction in the spacing of the scoops.
other suitable material and are secured to the
together with the pressure exerted on the edge
edges of the tapes in predetermined spaced rela 20 of the tape as a result .of the scoops being pinched
tion to eachother therealong.
around the reinforced corded edge ,of the tape,
The parallel foundation tapes are normally dis
restricts the shrinkage of the scoop-bearing edge
posed in ya common plane, with the reinforced
of the tape, while throughout the remainder of
scoop-bearing edges of the two tapes in close
its width, the tape is unrestricted and free to
laterally adjacent relation to each other and with 25 shrink in all directions. Consequently. a shrink
the scoops of the respective tapes in alternating
age di?erential is‘set up between the scoop
interlocking relation.
bearing edge of the tape and the remainder of
Each fastener also includes a metal, plastic or
‘the width of ‘the tape fabric.
immediately adjacent and paralleling the one
' other slide, which is employed for engaging and
The shrinkage differential between the immef
disengaging the scoops. This slide is mounted ' diately adjacent portions of the tape develops
in a manner to ride on the interlocked scoops. ~1 an internal forcevin the free portion of the tape
with a minimum amount of rubbing action on the A adjacent the restricted reinforced edge portion
' tapes adjacent the inner ends of the scoops.
of the tape, which reacts perpendicularly to the
It has been common practice heretofore, to
normal plane of the tape in the reinforced edge ,
form the foundation tapes of yams composed
portion thereof, under the contractive force of
exclusively of combed cotton ?bres, and to make
shrinkage lengthwise ' of the tape. This condi
the tape fabric of one or two ply thicknesses.
tion results in the scoop-bearing edge of the tape
Normally the widths of these tapes range from
being forced out of the normal plane of the tape
1'; of an inch to 13/2 inches. The tapes are woven
into a series of undulations along the length of with various numbers of picks of-the fllling'or 40 the tape.
'
weft threads per inch, warpwise ‘of the tape
The primary object of the present invention is
fabric, and various numbers of warp ends per
to produce a tape for use as the foundation of
inch, weftwise of the tape fabric, in accordance
a. slide fastener which will remain?at at all
with the size and quality of the yarns employed,
times. The construction of the tape forming the
'- in order to provide a sufficient degree of ?rm
ness in the tape for supporting the scoops in
proper position to enter the guide tracks in the
slide: to Provide a high. degree of tensile strength
in the tape; and togive the tapes satisfactory
wearing qualities for enduring the hard usage to
which the slide fasteners are frequently sub
jected.
r
'
In many instanceamanufacturers of slide fas
' subject matter of the present invention will be
fully‘ disclosed hereinafter, reference being’had
. _ to the accompanying drawing, of which:
‘Figs. 1 and 2 diagrammatically illustrate, on a.
greatly, enlarged scale, a face view and typical
transverse sectional view respectively of a slide
' fastener employing foundation tapes made in ac
cordance with the present invention.‘
Primarily the invention‘ resides'ln the proper
teners have encountered considerable di?lculty
selection of material for the production of the
with the tapes composed of the combed cotton .55 tape.‘ To this end, the material best suited for i
2
_
.
2,400,924
the purpose of the present invention, and which .
arrangement affords considerable relative move
has proven to meet all the requirements, is high
tenacity synthetic ?lament, including rayon or
ment between the adjacent longitudinalareas al,
a2, a3 and at, within the body of the tape, in
the plane X-X (Fig. 2) of the tape fabric, longi
nylon, of 1%, denier (approximately 3,952,704
tudinally of the tapes, and this construction,
functioning in this manner, permits the tapes to
give and take longitudinally with any shrinkage
yards per pound), or ?ner, reduced to staple
lengths of not less than 11% inches and spun into i
yarn of two or three ply twist.
,Of' equal importance is the particular weave
employed. To this end, a. conventional four leaf
or stretching of the fabric of any article to which
the foundation tapes may be secured.
The material employed, 1. e. the spun staple
twill weave has proven to be best suited to the 10 yarns composed of the synthetic ?laments hav
’ purpose’ of the invention.
ing the characteristics previously noted, in con
The tape of the present invention is woven,
twill weave, provides a
junction of the four leaf
for example, in ?ve standard widths, namely,
_%",1’a". 1%", 1%" and 1".
The thickness of the tape, is also of importance.
and in all instances, regardless of width, the tape
is
_
‘
fore have been responsible for the undulating
of the corded edges of the foundation tapes of
is con?ned to a thickness not less than .010" or
greater than .028".
7
condition of ?accidity and yieldability in the
tape fabric, in the plane of the fabric, which is
not subject to the internal strains which hereto
r
the prior art.
The number of picks of ?lling per inch,
In fact, observance of the functioning of fas
throughout the length of the tape, and the num 20 teners employing the foundation tapes of the
ber of warp ends per inch, throughout the width
present invention appears to indicate that as the
of the tape, may be substantially equal, or may
slide B is moved along the interlocking scoops b,
vary relatively in the tapes of different widths._
b to effect progression of the interlocking of the
In the present instance it is preferable to em
successive disengaged scoops, a small degree of
25
ploythe maximum number of warp ends which
extensibility in the corded edges a, a to which the
can be conveniently handled in the weaving proc
scoops b, b are secured, takes place. This char
ess within the width of the particular fabric be
acteristic facilitates the interlocking of the
ing woven, thus the number of warp ends per inch
scoops b, b by the slide B and enables the slide 13
of the width of the tape may vary in the tapes
of different standard widths. ,
I
30 to be moved with a smooth easy motion along
the tapes.
Using the maximum number of warp ends in a
given width of tape and a substantially corre
sponding number of ?lling or, weft threads in each
.7
Any shrinkage differential which might be pro
’ duced in adjacent longitudinal sections of the
tape appears to be dissipated within the tape
unit of the length which is‘ equal to the width of '
by reason of the relative planar yieldability af
particular strip being fabricated, under the four 35 forded the adjacent sections of the tape. Thus
leaf twill weave, provides a tape of maximum tex
no undulating of the tapes occur and the tapes
ture having a maximum amount of ?exibility or
retain their ?at flaccid condition at all times.
?accidity over the entire area of the strip, and
lclaimz'
>
affords a maximum amount of planar yieldability .40
l. A foundation tape for slide fasteners, com
prising a narrow textile fabric composed of high
tenacity synthetic staple of a length not less than
1%; inches and of a weight not in excess ‘of 1%
denier spun into yarns of not less than two or
more than three ply twist, with said yarns ex
clusively constituting the warp and weft of the
tape fabric interwoven in a four leaf twill pat
in the plane of the tape, particularly in that por
tion of the tape lying between the inner side of
the corded edge reinforcement located adjacent
the one edge of the tape fabric and the opposite
free edge of the tape fabric.
The following table is provided to illustrate rel
ative differences in the tapes of different widths.
'
it
Warp-B. 8.._....pounds_.
Width, inches
‘Me . ‘Me
it
tern. ‘
-
it
heavy
2.‘ A foundation tape for slide fasteners, com
50 prising a narrow textile fabric composed of high
40
60
80
100
110
120
60
Thickness ...... "inches" 0.10
Number of warp ends.... -48
Number of watts per inch.
64
110
.019
48
56
150
.019
60
66
150
.019
84
- 56
200
.025
. 59
1 42
150
.019
112
56
Weft~B. S ________ -.do_..--
tenacity synthetic staple of a length not less than
1%; inches and of a weight not in excess of 1%
denier spun into yarns of not less than two or
1
more than three ply twist, with said yarns ex
55 clusively constituting the warp and weft of the
tape fabric interwoven in a four leaf twill'pat
tern, said fabric having a thickness range be
\ tween a minimum of .010 inch and a maximum of
1 p 1 Double.
In the accompanying drawing, the foundation
tapes are designated as Al and A2 respectively.
to
Each tape is thickened along one edge. as indi- .
cated at a, a.
.
.
The scoops b, b are of usual construction and
are pinched or otherwise set to grip the thickened
.028 inch.
3. A foundation tape for slide fasteners, comprising a narrow textile fabric composed of high
tenacity synthetic staple of a length not less than
11% inches and of a weight not in excess of 11/4
denier spun into yarns of not less than two or
edges a, a of the tapes ?rmly at relatively spaced 65 more than three ply twist, with said yams ex
points longitudinally‘ of the tapes. The slide B,' clusively constituting the warp- and weft of the
tape fabric interwoven in a, four leaf twill pattern,"
likewise, is of usual construction and cooperates
with the scoops b, b to effect engagement and ‘ said tapes being formed» in widths of predeter
mined steps ranging from % inch to 1 inch, and
‘disengagement thereof, in the usual manner.
The conventional four leaf twill weave produces 70 said warps having a range of breaking strength
between a minimum of 40 lbs. and a maximum of
in‘ the fabric four parallel longitudinal areas al,
120 lbs. propdrtional to said predetermined steps
a2, a3 and .a# respectively, in a herring-bone Pat
I
tern, with the lines of the pattern in laterally " respectively in said width range.
4. A foundation tape for slide fasteners‘, com
adjacent successive areas. disposed at relatively
prising a narrow textile fabric composed of high
' sharp .angles'with respect to each other. This
aeoacae
tenacity syntheticv staple of a length not less than
more thanthree ply twist, with said yarns ex
clusively constituting the warp and weft of the
tape fabric interwoven in a four leaf twill pat
tern, said tapes being formed in widths of pre
determined steps ranging from %" inch to 1 inch,
_
I 3
mum of 150 lbs. proportional to said predeten'v
mined steps respectively in said width range.
11%; inches‘ and of a weight not in excess of 1%
denier spun into yarns of not less than two or ‘
.-
7. YA foundation tape for slide fasteners, com
prising a narrow textile fabric composed of high
5 tenacity synthetic staple of a length not less than.
11% inches and of a Weight not inexcess of 11/4
denier spun into yarns of not less than two‘ or
more than three ply twist, with said yarns ex
and said vwefts having a range of breaking
clusively constituting the warp and weft of the
strength from a minimum of 60 lbs. to a maxi 10 tape fabric interwoven in a four leaf twill pat
mum of 150 lbs. proportional to said predeter
tern, said tapes being formed in widths of pre
mined steps respectively in saidwidth range.
5.‘ A foundation tape for slide fasteners, com
determined steps ranging from % inch toy1 inch,
said warps having a range of breaking strength
prising a narrow textile fabric composed of high
between a minimum of 40 lbs. and a maximum of
tenacity syntheticlstaple of a length not less than 15 120 lbs. proportional to said predetermined steps
11% inches and of a weight not in excess of 1%.
respectively in said width range, and said wefts
denier spuninto yarns of not less than two or
having a range of breaking strength from a mini
more than three ply twist, with said yarns ex
mum of 60 lbs. to a maximum of 150 lbs. propor
clusively constituting‘the warp and weft of the
tional to said predetermined steps respectively in
tape fabric interwoven in a four leaf twill pat 20 said width range.
tern, said fabric having a thickness range be
8. A foundation tape for slide fasteners, com
tween a minimum of’ .010 inch and a maximum
prising a narrow textilefalbric composed of high
of .028 inch, said tapes being formed'in widths ‘ tenacity synthetic staple of a length not less than
of predetermined steps ranging from % inch to
1?; inches and a weight not in excess of 11A
1 inch, and said warps having a, range of breaking 25 denier spun into yarns of ‘not less than two or
strength between a minimum of 40 lbs. and a ,
more than three ply twist, with said yarns ex-,
maximum of 120 lbs. proportional to said pre
clusivelyconstituting the warp and weft of the
determined steps respectively inlsaid width range.
tape fabric interwoven in a four leaf twill pat
6. A foundation tape for slide fasteners,‘ com
tern, said fabric having a thickness range between
‘I prising a narrow textile fabric composed of high. 30 a minimum of .010 inch and a maximum of .028
tenacity synthetic staple of a length not less than
inch, said tapes being formed in widths of pre
11'; inches and of a weight not in excess of 11A
determined steps ranging from % inch to 1 inch,
denier ‘spun into yarns of not less than two or
more than three ply twist, with said yarns ex
said warps having a range of breaking strength
between a minimum of 40 lbs. and a maximum of
clusively constituting the warp and weft of the 35 120 lbs. proportional to said predetermined steps
tape fabric interwoven in a four leaf twill pat
respectively in said width range, and said wefts
tern, said fabric having a thickness range be
having a range of breaking strength from a mini- tween a minimum of, .010 inch and a maximum
mum of 60 lbs. to a maximum of 150 lbs. propor
of .028 inch, said tapes being formed in widths
tional to said predetermined steps respectively in
of predetermined steps ranging from % inch to 40 said width-range.
V
1 inch, and said wefts having a range of breaking
strength from a minimum of 60 lbs. to a maxi- -
.
JOHN E.‘ FIFE,‘ JR.
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