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Патент USA US2532359

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Dec. 5, 1950
G. E. DATH
2,532,358‘
FRICTION SHOCK‘ ABSORBER FOR RAILWAY CAR TRUCKS
Filed Oct. 25, 1948
129-1
2
o
"
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
Dec. 5, 1950
G, 5, BATH
2,532,358
FRICTION SHOCK ABSORBER FOR RAILWAY CAR TRUCKS
Filed Oct. 25, 1948
"2 Sheets-Sheet .2
Patented Dec. 5, 1950
2,532,358
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,532,358
FRICTION SHOCK ABSORBER FOR RAILWAY
GAR TRUCKS
George E. Bath, Mokena, 111., assignor to W. H.
Miner, Inc., Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Dela
Ware
Application October 25, 1948, Serial No. 56,350
6 Claims.
1
(01. 287-4)),
2
This invention relates to improvements in fric
bottom helical coil spring G surrounding the bot
tion shock absorbers for snubbing the action. of
railway car truck springs.
One object of the invention is to provide a
tom post and the lower end of the shoe E and op
posing relative approach of the same.
friction shock absorber of the character indi
circular discs and have the posts C‘ and D formed
i The follower plates A and B are in the form of
cated comprising top and bottom friction posts,
an intermediate friction shoe member with which
the posts have lengthwise sliding frictional en
gagement, and top and bottom springs reacting
between the shoe member and posts for opposing
relative lengthwise movement of the posts with
respect to the shoe member, wherein the posts
integral therewith, the post C depending from
the top follower plate A and the post D upstand
ing from the bottom follower plate B. Each of
the posts C and D includes a vertically disposed,
s relatively heavy plate portion l9, having a length
wise extending ?at friction surface I I on its inner
are held in tight frictional engagement with the
shoe by resilient spring means.
A further object of the invention is to provide
a mechanism as set forth in the preceding para
graph wherein the tight frictional engagement
between the posts and the shoe member is “pro
vided by springs which oppose relative movement
of the same, the springs being in the form of
helical coils surrounding the posts and shoe mem
ber and distorted to press laterally inwardly on
the shoe member and each post at respectively
opposite sides of the mechanism to force the
same together.
Other objects of the invention will more clear
ly appear from the description and claims here
inafter following.
In the accompanying drawings forming a part
of this speci?cation, Figure 1 is a side elevational
view of my improved shock absorber, showing the
springs in transverse vertical section. Figure 2
is a top plan view of the bottom friction post
shown in Figure 1. Figure 3 is a central, trans
verse, vertical sectional view of Figure l with the
top friction post omitted, the section correspond
ing substantially to the line 3-3 of Figure 4.
Figure 4 is a top plan view of the friction shoe
shown in Figure 1. Figure 5 is a side elevational
view of Figure 2, looking from left to right in
said ?gure. Figure 6 is a side elevational view of
side. As shown, the friction surfaces ll—ll of
the two posts C and D are in vertical alignment
and face in the same direction. At the outer end,
each post has a laterally inwardly projecting lug
E2 on the inner side thereof for a purpose here
inafter described. Each post C and D has a
cylindrical base portion it at the end thereof
where it merges with the corresponding follower
plate. A stop lug M for the tang at the outer
end of the corresponding spring F or G is pro
vided on each follower plate A and B, extending
radially outwardly from the base portion is of
the corresponding post. As clearly shown in
Figure l, the stop lugs I e—l!i of the top and
bottom posts are preferably located at the right
hand side of the mechanism.
The friction shoe member E is in the form of
a block having a vertical opening I5 therethrough
into which the top and bottom friction posts C
and D extend. The member E has a laterally,
outwardly projecting, annular ?ange midway be
tween its top and bottom ends forming a follow
er portion 16. The top and bottom‘ sections of
the shoe member E, which project from the fol
lower portion !5, have cylindrical base portions
l'i-l'i which merge with the follower portion l5,
these cylindrical base portions being of smaller
diameter than the follower portion. At the right
hand side thereof, as shown in Figures 1‘, 3, and 4,
the top and bottom sections ‘of the shoe are thick~
ened to provide semi-cylindrical outer wall por
tions |8-—I8 in vertical alignment with the base
is a side elevational view of the canted or inclined
portions li—-l'i of said sections at the corre
coil spring employed at the top of the shock ab
sponding side of the mechanism. At the left
45
sorber.
hand side thereof, as seen in Figure 3, the top and
My improved shock absorber, as shown in the
bottom sections of the shoe member E are ex
drawings, comprises broadly top and bottom fol
tended a slight distance above and below the
the canted or inclined coil spring employed at the
bottom of my improved shock absorber. Figure '7
lower plates A and B, vertically disposed top and
‘bottom friction posts C and D extending from the
follower plates A and B, respectively, an inter
mediate friction shoe member E, a top helical coil
spring F surrounding the top post and the upper
end portion of the: friction shoe member E and
opposing relative approach of the same, and a 55
main body portion of said member, as indicated
at Iii-l9. At the left hand side thereof, as seen
in Figures 1, 3, and 4, the shoe member E has
the top and bottom sections thereof reenforced
by lengthwise extending webs 2?—20. Top and
bottom stop lugs 2 I—2l for the tangs at the inner
ends of the top and bottom springs, are provided
2,532,358
3
4
on the follower portion it of the shoe member E,
extending radially outwardly from the base por
tions ll—-l'| of the top and bottom sections of
said shoe member. These stop lugs are prefer
Figure 1, and the tang at the lower end will be
in back of the upper lug 2| of the shoe member
E, when the mechanism is completely assembled,
and the spring G being placed over the post D
ably located at the right hand side of the mecha
in such a manner that the tang at the lower
nism in vertical alignment with the stop lugs
lél—lll of the top and bottom posts. The shoe
end thereof will be in back of the lug 14 of the
post D and the tang at the upper end will be in
back of the lower lug 2| of the shoe member.
member E has a lengthwise extending, interior,
The posts C and D, with the springs thereon,
fiat friction surface 22, which is formed on the
right hand side wall of the opening l5, as seen ii) are assembled with the shoe E by engaging the
springs F and G over the upper and lower sec
in Figure 3, engaged by the friction surfaces
The surface 22 is
tions of the shoe member E and. inserting the
recessed lengthwise to provide a longitudinally
friction plates I §—~l8 of the two posts within
ll-—~H of the posts C and D.
the opening [5 of the shoe member and pressing
extending central slot 23 to accommodate the
the parts together until the lugs l2-l2 of the
lugs I2—l2 of the posts. The slot 23 is closed at
posts snap over the stop shoulders 24—24 of the
the top and bottom ends, thus providing top and
shoe member and engage Within the slot 23. The
bottom stop shoulders 2?-—2ll with which the lugs
posts and shoe member will thus be locked to
l2—-l2 of the posts are engageable to limit
gether against lengthwise separation. During
lengthwise expansion of the mechanism and hold
the posts assembled with the shoe member.
20 this operation, the springs F and G are forcibly
?exed from their inclined positions to the righted
The top and bottom helical coil springs F and
positions shown in Figure l to exert lateral in
G surround the posts C and D and the corre~
sponding projecting sections of the shoe member
ward pressure on the posts and shoe member
E, the spring F having its upper end bearing on
to force the friction surfaces of the posts into
tight frictional contact with the friction surface
of the shoe member. As wiil be evident, the stop
lugs léi—!¢l and 2l-2l prevent rotation of the
springs F’ and G, thus maintaining the same in
the underneath side of the top follower plate A
and its lower end bearing on the upper side of
the follower portion Iii of the shoe member E,
and the spring G having its lower end bearing
on the bottom follower plate B and its upper end
proper position to press the posts against the
bearing on the underneath side of the follower 30 shoe member.
My improved shock absorber preferably re
portion it of the shoe member. Both springs
F and G, in the assembled condition of the
mechanism, are under canting tension, that is,
places one or more of the spring units of a truck
spring cluster, being interposed between the usual
top and bottom spring plates, which cooperate
with said cluster.
are formed so that they forcibly tend to assume
inclined positions, the spring F toward the right
and the spring G toward the left, as seen in
The operation of the improved shock absorber
Figure 1, thereby forcibly pressing the inner side
of the upper coil of the top spring F at the right
is as follows: Upon the cluster of springs of the
truck of a railway car being compressed between
hand side of the mechanism against the base
portion l3 of the top post C, and the inner side
the spring follower plates of the cluster, my im
proved shock absorbing unit, which is disposed
between the follower plates, is compressed with
the springs, thereby forcing the post C down
wardly toward the post D against the resistance
of the springs F and G, the friction surface of
the post C sliding on the friction surface 22 of
of the lower coil at the left hand side of the
mechanism against the base portion ll of the
upper section of the shoe member E, and forcibly
pressing the inner side of the lower coil of the
bottom spring G at the right hand side of the
mechanism against the base portion 13 of the
post D and the inner side of the upper coil at
the left hand side of the mechanism against the
base portion ii’ of the lo"er section of the shoe
member E. The pressure thus exerted by the
canting tension of the two springs and G forces
the friction surfaces of the posts into tight fric
tional engagement with the friction surface of
i ii
the shoe member and the friction surface 22 of
the shoe member sliding on the friction surface
of the post D. Due to the canting tension of the
springs F and G, the parts are held in tight
frictional contact during this relative movement
of the same, thereby providing the desired fric
tional resistance between the shoe member and
the two posts.
Upon release of the mechanism the posts C
the shoe E.
In the assembled condition of the mechanism, 55 and D are restored to the normal position shown
the springs F and G are preferably under initial
in Figure l by the expansive action of the springs
compression. As shown in Figures 6 and 7, the
F‘ and G, longitudinal separation of the parts
springs F and G, as manufactured, are of special
being limited by engagement of the stop lugs
design to produce the canting tension when
l2-i2 of the posts with the stop shoulders 24-24
assembled with, the posts C and D, being coiled 60 of the shoes.
on axes which are inclined with respect to the
I claim:
central vertical arses of the bases of the respective
1. In a friction shock absorber, the combina
springs, the spring F being coiled in such a man
tion with top and bottom friction posts relatively
ner that it leans to the left when stood on its
movable toward and away from each other; of an
base, as illustrated in Figure '7, and the spring 05 intermediate friction shoe with which said posts
have longitudinal sliding engagement; and top
and bottom springs reacting between said shoe
and said top and bottom posts, respectively, yield
when forcibly righted by flexing the same toward
ingly opposing relative lengthwise movement of
their upright positions, as shown
Figure 1.
70 the posts toward each other, said springs being
G in such a manner that it leans to the right,
as illustrated in Figure 6. These springs thus
tend to assu e their leaning, inclined positions
In assembling the mechanism, the springs F
and G are ?rst applied to the posts C and D, the
spring F being placed over the post (3 in such. a
position that the tang
the upper end will be
in back of the lug IA of the post C, as seen in 75
canted to exert lateral inward pressure on said
posts and shoe to force the same together.
2. In a friction shock absorber, the combina
tion with a top friction post; of a bottom friction
post, each of said Posts having a lengthwise ex
5
2,532,358
tending friction surface, the friction surfaces of
said posts facing in the
direction; an
intermediate friction shoe having a lengthwise
extending friction surface thereon in sliding en~
gagement with the friction surfaces of said posts;
a top spring opposing relative movement of the
shoe and top post toward each other; and a
bottom spring opposing relative movement of
said shoe and bottom post toward each other,
6
mediate friction shoe with which said posts have
lengthwise sliding frictional engagement, said
top post having a base portion presenting a
lateral abutment surface, said bottom post hav
ing a base portion presenting a lateral abutment
surface; a laterally projecting follower ?ange on
exert lateral inward pressure on said posts and
shoe.
said shoe between the upper and lower portions
thereof, said upper portion of the shoe having a
base portion presenting a lateral abutment face,
said lower portion of the shoe having a base
portion presenting a lateral abutment face; a coil
spring under tension in canting direction enclos
3. In a friction shock absorber, the combina
ing said top post and bearing at its top and bot
said top and bottom springs being canted to
tion with a top follower; of top friction post
depending from said top follower; a bottom fol
lower; a bottom friction post upstanding from
said bottom follower; an intermediate friction
shoe provided with a follower member between
its upper an‘ lower ends, said shoe and posts
having cooperating, lengthwise extending fric
tion surfaces; a top spring surrounding said top
post and hearing at its top and bottom ends on
said topfcllower and follower member of the
shoe, respectively;
a 'bottom spring sur
rounding said bottom post and bearing at its top and bottom ends on said follower member of
tom ends on said top follower plate and the upper
side of the follower ?ange of the shoe, said spring
having the inner sides of the top coil thereof
bearing on the outer side of the base portion of
said top post at one side of the mechanism and
the inner side of the bottom coil bearing on the
base portion of the upper portion of said shoe at
the opposite side of the mechanism; and a second
coil spring under tension in canting direction
enclosing said bottom post and bearing at its top
and bottom ends, respectively, on the underneath
side of the follower flange of said shoe and the
bottom follower, said spring having the inner
the shoe and said bottom follower, said top and
bottom springs being canted to exert lateral in
side of the top coil thereof bearing on the outer
side of the base portion of said bottom post at
ward pressure on said posts and shoe.
said ?rst named side of the mechanism and the
1.1.. In a friction shock absorber, the combina 30 inner side of the upper coil bearing on the base
tion with a top friction post having a laterally
portion of the lower portion of said shoe at the
outwardly facing abutment surface on the outer
opposite side of the mechanism.
side thereof at one side of the mechanism; of a
6. In a friction shock absorber, the combina
bottom friction post having a laterally outwardly
tion with top and bottom friction posts relatively
facing abutment surface at the outer side there~ 35 movable toward and away from each other; of
of at said side of the mechanism; an intermedi
an intermediate friction shoe with which said
ate friction shoe having lengthwise sliding en
gagement with the inner sides of said posts, said
posts have lengthwise sliding engagement; stop
shoe having upper and lower, laterally outwardly
facing abutment surfaces at the opposite side of
the mechanism; a helical coil spring under cant
ing tension surrounding said top post and oppos
ing relative lengthwise movement of said post
and shoe toward each other, said spring having
the inner sides of the coils at the top and bot
tom ends in bearing engagement respectively
with the abutment surface of said top post and
the top abutment surface of said shoe; and a
second helical coil spring under canting tension
surrounding said bottom post and opposing rela
tive longitudinal movement of said post and shoe
toward each other, said last named spring having
the inner sides of the coils at the top and bottom
ends in bearing engagement, respectively, with
the bottom abutment surface of said shoe and
the abutment surface of said bottom post.
5. In a friction shock absorber, the combina~
tion with a top follower plate; of a bottom fol
lower plate; a top friction post depending from
said top plate; a bottom friction post upstand 60
ing from said bottom follower plate; an inter
lugs on said post engageable with stop shoulders
on said shoe for limiting lengthwise expansion of
the mechanism; and top and bottom coil springs
reacting between said shoe and said top and bot
tom posts, respectively, yieldingly opposing rela
tive lengthwise movement of said posts toward
each other, said springs being canted to press
laterally inwardly on said shoe and posts to hold
the same in tight frictional contact with. each
other.
GEORGE E. DATH.
REFERENCES CITED
The following references are of record in the
?le of this patent:
Number
UNITED STATES PATENTS
Name
Date
932,215
2,108,124
2,410,160
2,399,048
2,446,164
Wilcox __________ __ Aug.
Hobson __________ __ Feb.
Haseltine ________ __ Oct.
Light ____________ __ Apr.
24,
15,
29,
23,
Willoughby ______ __ July 27,
1909
1938
1946
1946
1948
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