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Патент USA US2587001

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Feb. 26, 1952
H. E. S'CHLENZ
2,586,998
APPARATUS FOR HEATING MATERIALS
Filed May 31, 1946
7 Sheets-Sheet l
INVENTOR. '
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Feb. 26, 1952
H. E. SCHLENZ
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APPARATUS FOR HEATING MATERIALS
Filed‘ May 51, 1946
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Patented Feb. 26, 1952
2,586,998
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,586,998
APPARATUS FOR HEATING MATERIALS
Harry E. Schlenz, Glencoe, Ill., assignor to Paci?c
Flush Tank Company, Chicago, 111., a corpora
tion of Illinois
Application May 31, 1946, Serial No. 673,659
15 Claims. (Cl. 122-449)
1
2
This invention relates to heaters and has to do
particularly with improved apparatus for heat
ing materials which are essentially in a liquid
state such as liquids, and liquids carrying en
ing heated, and condensation of combustion
products are minimized, thereby insuring effi
cient operation, long life of the apparatus, and
a minimum of loss of time for cleaning, repai
trained or suspended solids.
It is necessary in certain processes as, for ex
or replacement of parts.
ample, the digestion of sludge separated from
a heater for liquid materials, which heater is
formed with coils for conducting heating gases
and liquid material to be heated through a liquid
'
Another object of the invention is to provide
domestic sewage or trades wastes (which for con
venience are designated herein as “digestible
organic wastes”), to maintain such material at 10 heat exchange medium, the coils being arranged
an optimum temperature in order that digestion
to permit them to be cleaned readily with a mini
or other processes may proceed to the desired end
mum of lost operating time.
result and at the highest efficiency. Heretofore
Another object of the invention is to provide
the necessary heat has been provided by heating
an improved heater for liquid materials which
water in a standard gas ?red water tube heater 15 is simple and rugged in construction, easy and
or boiler and circulating the water by means of
inexpensive to manufacture and which is highly
a pump through a series of coils immersed in
ef?cient in operation.
the material to be heated, the water so circulated
Another object of the invention is to provide a
giving up its heat by heat transfer to the con
heater for liquid materials wherein a liquid heat
tents of the tank. Certain materials, such as 20 exchange medium is con?ned in surrounding re
sewage sludge, when heated to any substantial
temperature, tend to scorch or burn and build
up on the walls of the heat transfer coil. The
lation to a coil through which a heating gas or
gases are circulated and is maintained in heat
exchange relation with a coil through which liq
uid material to be heated is circulated, whereby
crust or cake thus formed tends to act as an
insulation and interferes with the proper trans 25 the heat transfer between the heating gas or
fer of heat to the liquid to ‘be heated. It is then
gases and the liquid to be heated can be closely
necessary to d-e-water the tank to remove the
controlled and the apparatus can be operated at
scale or crust from the coil, thereby causing dis
an optimum temperature of the liquid to be
ruption of the process and requiring substantial
heated and with a high degree of efficiency of
time and expense. Furthermore, in heating cer 30 the heater.
I
tain materials, such as sludge, it is necessary to
Still‘ another object of the invention is to pro
circulate water through the system at tempera
vide a novel and highly efficient burner suit
tures relatively lower than the temperature of
able for numerous applications and which is ca
the combustion gas which causes aserious con
dition at the boiler since the gas when burned re
pable of burning'gaseous fuel, liquid fuel, or
' gaseous and liquid fuels simultaneously.
leases moisture‘ and sulphur compounds which
A further object of the invention is to pro
vide a novel burner capable of burning gaseous
tend to condense on the coils or boiler sections
con?ning the relatively low temperature circu~
fuel, liquid fuel, or both, simultaneously and
lating water in the boiler. These condensed
wherein the supply of liquid fuel to the burner
~moisture and sulphur compounds form sulphuric 4:0 is controlled automatically in accordance with
...acid which results in rapid deterioration of the
the pressure of the gaseous fuel supply, whereby
boiler.
upon a decrease in the availability of gaseous
An object of the invention is to provide a heat
fuel at the burner below a predetermined mini~
er for liquid materials wherein the liquid to be
mum, liquid fuel is supplied in lieu of, or in addi
heated is con?ned and circulated through a liq
tion to, the gaseous fuel.
uid heating bath, and heating gases ‘are con
A further object of the invention is to provide lined and circulated through the bath in such
a heater for liquid material which heater is
manner that a highly e?icient heat exchange
adapted to utilize, for other purposes than the
takes place between the heating gases and the
heating of the liquid material, any heat result
liquid to be heated and wherein there is ob- '
ing from combustion of available fuel and which
tained a relatively complete utilization of the
may be in excess of the amount of heat required
eat available from the heating gases.
for heating the liquid material to the desired
Another object of the present invention is to
temperature and which excess heat might other
provide a heater for liquid materials wherein the
wise be wasted.
.
,
deposition of boiler scale, caking of. material be
55
Still another object of the invention is to pro
2,586,998
3
vide a novel and ef?cient heater which is excel
4
ent application is especially well adapted for use
lently well adapted for heating sewage sludge
in a system such as disclosed and claimed in my
or supernatant liquid withdrawn from a digester
and for utilizing in the heater the gas generated
aforementioned patent, in which system sewage
sludge or supernatant liquid is withdrawn from
a digester, circulated through and heated by the
heater and returned to the digester. The heater
of the present application also is well adapted to
by the digestion process.
Other and more speci?c objects or" the inven
tion are to provide a heater for liquid materials
utilize as a fuel ‘the gas generated in the digester
which is adapted to heat such liquid materials
as disclosed in the above mentioned patent.
which are circulated at an optimum velocity
through a conduit located in a liquid bath; which 10 However, the heater is not limited to use in the
above manner but is well adapted for many other
has a liquid bath requiring only a relatively small
applications where a liquid material is to be
amount of water; which has a ‘bath adapted to
heated and the heater may use gaseous, solid or
be connected to an external system whereby the
liquid fuel produced from other sources than di
bath water can be used for heating ‘purposes in
addition to the heating of the liquid circulated 15 gesting sewage or trades wastes.
In Figs. 1, 2 and 3 there is shown somewhat
through the bath or can be supplied with bath
diagrammatically one form of heater constructed
liquid heated from a source of heat outside the
in accordance with the invention and which is
bath: which is provided with a liquid heating
well adapted for use in a sewage treatment sys
tube and ?re tubes which can be exposed readily
from outside the water bath tank for cleaning or 20 tem as above described or for many other uses.
Referring particularly to Fig. ‘1, the heater I
repair; which is compact and efficient as to ?oor
preferably comprises a water vtank or basin 2'ar
‘space; which has a highly ei?cient arrangement
ranged in'a pluralitytof sections by means of :one
oi’liquid ‘tubes and ?re tubes adapted to provide
or more intermediate walls 3. Each section may
heat exchange therebetween by radiation, con
be provided with a burner indicated generally at
duction and convection, ‘thereby utilizing a high
4 for effecting combustion of the gas fuel .sup
percentage of the heat developed in the ?re
plied to the burner, such as, the gas generated
tubes; and which provides for ventilation of the
during the digestion process in a sewage digester.
heater room or other space.
Combustion of the gas may take place within
vOther objects and advantages of the inven~
tion will appear from the following description 30 and the hot gases therefrom may pass through a
flue or ?re tube coil 5 in the lower part of the
taken in connection with the appended drawings
tank 2 to heat water or other heat transfer
in which;
liquid contained within the tank. In standard
Figure l is a vertical, sectional view showing
gas ?red boilers used in liquid heating systems
somewhat diagrammatically a heater constructed
inzaccordance with the invention;
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary, horizontal, sectional
view taken along the line 2-—2 of Fig. 1;
heretofore employed, considerable difficulty was
experienced due to the moisture and sulphur
compounds released due to the combustion of this
type of gas. In the prior systems, these com
pounds tended to condense on the coils of the
shown in Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a vertical, sectional view through an all boiler sections con?ning’the relatively low tem
perature water in the boiler, and the compounds
other embodiment of the invention with certain
formed, such as sulphuric acid, resulted in rapid
of the parts broken away and in section;
deterioration of the boiler. With the present
Fig. 5 is a front elevational view of the heater
heater, the Water in the tank is heated to a sub
of Fig. ‘1;
stantially higher temperature than the water in
Fig. 6 is a fragmentary side elevational view,
the standard boiler heretofore employed and no
with certain of the parts broken away and in
material condensation of the moisture and sul
section, of a further embodiment of the inven
Fig. 3 is a front elevational view of the heater
tion;
phur compounds takes place.
Therefore, the
coils 5 are not subjected to such rapid deteriora
Fig. '7 is a front elevational view of the heater
of Fig. 6 and showing also the external circuit
tion as the water coils or boiler sections in pre
connected thereto; certain of the parts being
viously used apparatus. No appreciable amount
of scale can be formed since the water which
broken away and in section;
completely surrounds the fines or coils 5 is not
Fig. 8 is a somewhat diagrammatic, fragmen
changed so that scale forming material on the
tary View showing a heater in which the tank
has a modi?ed baffle arrangement for dividing " fines and the coils is avoided. If any scale for
mation or deposit forms on the inside of the
the tank into two zones;
coils 5, the construction is such as to permit
Fig. 9 is a view of a vertical section through
them to be readily cleaned on the inside. To
still a ‘further embodiment oi the invention;
this end the various pipes comprising the coils
Fig. 10 is a fragmentary front elevational view
of the structure of Fig. 9, certain of the parts 60 5 extend to the ends of the tank 2 and are con
nected externally thereof by means of return
being broken away and in section;
bends 6 which may be readily removed to facili
Fig. 11 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional
tate cleaning of the coils.
view taken along line ll—ll of Fig. 9;
The heating or liquid coil 8, through which the
Fig. 12 is a somewhat diagrammatic view
sludge or other liquid to be heated is passed, also
showing a burner and controls therefor, associ
has many distinct advantages not attainable in
ated with a heater tank, shown in part, embody
the apparatus heretofore used. In the prior ap
ing my invention; and
paratus the heating coils within the digestion
Fig. 13 is a View similar to Fig. 10 only show
tank carried water or material to be heated at
ing a modi?ed arrangement for actuating the
approximately 180° F. in order to supply suffi
thermal control valve.
cient heat to the digestion material within the
This application is a continuation-in-part of
tank. This tended to cause a scorching of the
my application S. N. 567,408 ?led December 9,
sludge, or other material, and a caking on the
1944, now Patent No. 2,516,076 dated July 15,
exterior of the pipes composing the coil, which
1950.
The heater disclosed and claimed in the Pres 76 materially reduced the ef?ciency of the digestion
2,586,998
5
6
.
recovered by passing them through the ?ues of
section of the plant. Removal of such cake or
crust required shut down of the digestion section
of the plant and a constant heavy expense for
an additional section of the heat exchanger
herein described. It is also realized that, in the
labor and time.
case of areas Where electric power is readily
’
Caking in the coils 8 to any great extent is
available at a low rate of cost, an auxiliary heat
ing means may be provided in the form of an
prevented by pumping the material therethrough
at a su?iciently rapid rate so that it does not
electric heating unit (not shown) paralleling
become scorched or burned and thus cannot cake
the combustion tubes in certain sections of the
on the inside surface of the coil. However, the
heat exchanger, to be used as a standby in the
coil 8 in the present instance is so constructed 10 place of using other types of combustion ma
that what little caking may occur can be readily
terials in case of a failure of the gas supply.
removed without necessitating a shut-down in
the operation of the heater for any appreciable
period. Moreover, each section of the heater is
Instead of circulating combustion gases through
a flue immersed in the water bath, the bath may
be heated by circulating bath water from the
provided with an independent coil, each com 15 tank through a water heater or boiler of any
prising a plurality of pipes or conduit sections
known construction heated by any available type
9 connected externally of the tank 2 by means
or" fuel.
of return bends I0. The coil in any one section
The heater of this invention may be heated
may be shut off from operation for cleaning
by any suitable type of burner but preferably
while the coils in the remaining sections con
I employ a burner such as disclosed in my co
tinue to operate. In larger installations, a num
pending divisional application Serial No. 58,055,
ber of units can be employed so that but a small
?led November 3, 1948, which is capable of burn
capacity need be out of service at any one time
ing either gas or liquid fuel, such as oil, or both.
for cleaning.
In the apparatus of the present invention both
This type of burner is particularly desirable for
use with the heater when the heater is utilized
for heating sewage sludge, wherein economy of
operation can be obtained by employing the gas
generated in the sewage digester as a source of
heat. However, in many cases insu?‘lcient gas
the ?ues and liquid coils are readily accessible for
cleaning and thus permit a simple mode of
maintaining the heater at its peak e?iciency at
all times. Caking of the sludge or other ma
terial within the coils is to a great extent pre
vented by the high rate of circulation of the
sludge, or other material, which tends to increase
30
is generated to provide the desired heating and
it is necessary to supplement the gas heating
by liquid fuel heating.
the heat transfer coe?cient of the heater and
consequently permits a reduced coil area. The
condensation of moisture and sulphur com
In Figs. 4 and 5 there is illustrated somewhat
diagrammatically a further embodiment of the
invention in which the heater is particularly well
pounds resulting from combustion of the gas is
adapted for utilizing the heat of the available
fuel for other purposes, in addition to heating
the liquid material.
reduced to a minimum since the water within
the tank of the heater is maintained at a suf?
ciently high temperature to avoid such con
Referring particularly to Fig. 4, the heater
densation. Moreover, the temperature in the ~19 includes a tank I05, the front wall of which
?ue and the stack is maintained above the con
densation temperature of the combustion gases
and also the velocity of the gases is sufficient
to carry any condensation products out of the
stack.
In the case of relatively small installations i
where it may not be feasible to provide multiple
combined heater and heat exchanger sections,
the cleaning of the tubes, including both the
combustion tubes and the sludge or liquid heat- ..
ing tubes may be completed in a few hours,
during which time the heating of the digester ~
or other apparatus connected to the heater may
includes a removable panel I06. Some or all of
the walls of the tank may be insulated in a
manner not illustrated but which will be readily
understood. .
A coil I07 for circulating liquid to be heated
is disposed in one portion of the tank and in
cludes an inlet I08 extending into the tank, a
plurality of generally parallel and preferably
horizontal tubes I09 connected at their ends by
removable return bends IIO disposed outside the
tank and attached to the front and rear walls
thereof respectively, and an outlet III connected
to the coil I07 and extending through the front
wall of the tank I05 at the upper portion
thereof.
A heating ?ue or ?re tube assembly H5 is dis
be omitted since the loss in temperature during
this short period would be so slight that it could
be easily made up when the unit is returned to
service.
posed in the side portion of the tank I05 not oc
While the heat for the water bath in the heat
cupied by the liquid coil I01 and includes an elon
exchanger is herein shown as obtained from the
gated generally horizontal combustion chamber
combustion of gas generated during the diges 60 or ?re box H6 extending substantially through
tion of sludge, such heat may be obtained in
out the length of the tank I05, and having a suit
other ways. For example, where such gas is
able burner Ill associated therewith. While the
utilized in internal combustion engines, it is
burner II‘I, including the controls therefor, may
possible to utilize the heat from the Water in
be of any suitable construction, preferably it is
the cooling jacket of the engine by circulating 65 similar to the burner disclosed in my aforesaid
copending divisional application. Connected to
heat exchanger as the water bath, maintaining
the ?re box I I6 at the end away from the burner
a temperature most suitable to the gas engine
II‘! is a plurality of generally parallel horizontal
such water through one of the sections of the
operation. In this case the combustion coil
should either be omitted or remain idle, since 70
the heat given up to the circulated material for
heating the digester would also result in a cool
ing of the circulated water to serve the purpose
of cooling the engine. Heat from exhaust gases
of the internal combustion engine may also be" '
?ues or ?re tubes H8 connected at their front
ends by removable return bends I I9 disposed ex
teriorly of the tank and supportedon the re
movable panel II36. At their rear ends the ?re
tubes II8 are suitably connected by return bends
I20 which are disposed entirely within the tank
I05. The ?re tubes I I8 may be supported at their
2,686,998
‘8
7
rear ends ‘by suitable means such as a mounting
bracket (not shown). The end of the ?re tube
coil I I5 is connected to an external stack I28 and
suitable exhaust means ‘(not shown) may be pro
vided for producing a draft. If desired, however,
the burner I I1 may be operated by pressure ?ring
wherein the fuel is injected into the ?re box under
su?lcient pressure to produce the necessary draft
I58 and a pluralityof pipes I56 extending through
the colder zone and connected at their ends by
removable return bends I51 disposed externally of
the tank.
A ?re tube assembly I50 is disposed in the hot
zone I52 and includes a combustion chamber or
?re box I6I extending into the tank I50 through
a removable front panel I62 and substantially
to support combustion, as for example by a con
throughout the length of the tank I50. Extend
ventional blast type of burner.
The ?re tubes I I8 may be cleaned readily with—
, ing upwardly from the rear of the ?re box [BI
is a vertical header I53 to which is connected a
out tie-watering the tank by merely removing the
external return bends H5. Since the ?re box IIS
and the ?re‘ tubes II8 all are secured to the re
movable front panel I06, all of these members
can be removed from the tank I05 as a unit for
cleaning the exterior of the tubes if such be de
sired or replacing the unit in its entirety.
Disposed within the tank I05 and interposed
between the ?re tubes I I8 and the liquid tubes I85 .
is a bail‘le I2I which divides the tank into two dif
ferent temperature zones, namely, a hot zone I22
in which the ?re tube assembly I I5 is located and
a colder zone I23 in which the liquid coil IE1 is
located.
The ba?ie IZI preferably is of an insu~ -
lating type of material or is formed by two sheets
of metal with an air space or insulation there
between to reduce the direct heat transfer
through the baille. The baffle I2I preferably is
spaced from the top and bottom walls from the '
tank in order to provide spaces I21; and £25
the bath water to circulate between the Zones
and I23. A bath outlet I25 is provided in
front plate I51 at the upper portion thereof
for
I22
the
for
permitting hot water to be withdrawn from the
tank and a return inlet I21 is provided in the
front wall at the lower portion of the colder zone
£23’ for return of bath water into the tank. A
plurality of generally parallel, horizontal ?ues
I64 which extend through the front plate I62 and
communicate with a removable breeching I65
which constitutes a vertical header and is con
nected to an exhaust stack I55.
A burner I10 of suitable construction may be
provided at the forward end of the ?re box I5I.
The bath liquid is heated in the hot zone by the
?re box PM and ?re tubes I64 and at least a por
tion thereof is circulated by convection through
.the opening I59 into the colder zone I53, where
it ?ows downwardly past the liquid tubes I56 to
which it gives up its heat. The cooler liquid flows
to the bottom of the colder zone I53 from whence
it ?ows through the opening I55a back to the hot
zone. A portion of the bath liquid may be cir
culated from the colder zone I53 past the ?re box
IEI and externally of the tank I55 by a circuit
which includes means for con?ning the liquid
thus circulated in such manner as to cause it to
?ow positively in intimate contact with the ex
terior of the ?re box.
For this purpose the ?re box IGI is of two
walled construction and is provided with an in
terior wall I'II de?ning the ?re box proper or
combustion chamber and an outer wall or jacket
I12 entirely surrounding and spaced from the
inner wall I ‘II and providing a generally annular
space heating radiatorsinot shown) or other 40 space I13 through which bath liquid is circulated.
An intake pipe I14 extends from the bottom por
means for utilizing the heat of the water circu
tion of the colder zone I55 into the hot zone I52
lated from the bath, may be disposed externally
and is connected to the space I13 at the rearward
of the tank I05 and connected to the outlet I26
portion of the ?re box I51. An outlet pipe I15
and the inlet I21.
In certain cases it may be desirable to increase 45 extends from the space I13, preferably at the
forward end of the ?re box which projects out
the circulation in the bath in order to increase
of the tank I50, and is connected to an external
the heat exchange rate between the hot materials
circuit including a pump I88 driven by a motor
in the ?re tubes and the water bath and thence
IBI, a thermostatically controlled valve I82 and
to the liquid material in the tubes. This may
be accomplished by providing external circulating 50 a pipe I83 and an inlet I84 leading into the cold
zone I55 at the forward portion of the tank I55.
means including a pump such as indicated dia
Thus bath liquid can be drawn from the colder
grammatically at I38 (Fig. 5) and connected di
zone I53 and circulated around the ?re box I12
rectly between the hot zone and the colder zone
suitable circulating system, which may include
and
supplementing
the
thermal
circulation
and through the external system and back to
55 the top of the colder zone I53. Since the bath
around the ba?le, or as a substitute therefor.
liquid is con?ned in the annular space I13 sur
There is illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7 a further
rounding the ?re box I1‘2 it becomes heated to
form of heater constructed in accordance with
a greater degree than the liquid contained in
the invention, which is especially well adapted
the remainder of the hot zone I52 and can be
for supp-lying heat for purposes in addition to
the heating of the liquid material and including 60 utilized for purposes which require substantially
higher temperature than required to heat the
one form of external circuit for circulating liq
liquid tubes I56 in the colder zone. However,
uid between a hot zone and a colder zone of the
the bath liquid in the space I13 is prevented from
water bath.
being heated to an excessively high temperature
The heater includes a tank I50 generally simi
lar in construction to the tanks hereinbefore de 65 since it gives up heat to the surrounding liquid
at the surface of the jacket I12. The rate of
scribed and having a partition or ba?le I5! di
circulation to obtain the desired temperature of
viding the interior of the tank into a hot zone
the liquid circulated through the tubes I55 may
I52 and a colder zone I53. Communication be
be regulated by the valve !82 which preferably
tween the hot zone I52 and the colder zone I55 is
provided at the top and bottom of the tank I55 70 is controlled by the thermostat bulb I18 suitably
located, preferably in the bath liquid.
by openings I59 and I59a- respectively, which are
Any required portion of the liquid circulated
formed by spacing the baffle I5I from the top and
in the external circuit may be allowed to pass
bottom walls of the tank or by providing suitable
through a circuit including a pipe I85, one or
openings in the baffle. A liquid coil I54 is pro
more radiators I86, or other devices adapted to
vided which includes an inlet I55 and an outlet
9
2,586,998:
utilize any heat not required for heating the
liquid circulated through the tubes I56. The flow
of liquid in the external circuit is regulated by a
three-way valve I81 which may be controlled
by a thermostat or thermostats I88 located in
the space or spaces to be heated.
The arrangement illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7
front wall, as illustrated in Figs. 9 to 11 to whic
reference now is made. The vertical ?ue header .
or manifold thus may be located removably on
the outside of the tank in a manner similar to
the arrangement of the breeching on the front
of the tank. The external ?ue is of double wall
construction with the space between such walls
may be modi?ed slightly as illustrated somewhat
being connected by watertight ?ttings to the in
terior of the water bath chamber. Water for,
now is made. The liquid tank may be provided 10 building or other space heating is heated in‘ the
diagrammatically in Fig. 8, to which reference
with a ba?le l5la which extends from the top
wall to the ?oor of the tank and completely
hot zone of the water bath and passed through
the space surrounding the external ?ue, whereby
the water is heated to a relatively high tempera
colder zone 153a. The only interchange of liquid
ture for effective use in radiators or other heat-1
from the hotter zone |52a to the colder zone l53a 15 ing devices. In this arrangement, the ?re box
is provided by a circulation pump lBila similar
and ?ues are readily accessible for cleaning upon
to the pump |8ll above described, taking the
removal of the double wall header or manifold
liquid from the hotter zone l52a through a pipe
and the breeching at the front of the unit, and it
l'l5a, and discharging the liquid back into the
is, therefore, unnecessary to provide a removable Y
divides the bath into a hotter zone [52a and a
colder section l53a, through a pipe 183a and an 20 plate at the front of the unit.
1
inlet I 84a.
The tank 350 is divided by a vertically-extend
A thermostatic bulb l'l8a similar to the bulb
ing baffle 30! into a hot zone 302 and a colder zone
H8 and located in the colder zone |53a actuates
3B3, communication between the colder zone and
a valve I 82a similar to the valve I82 to control
the hot zone being provided at the bottom of the
the transfer of liquid from the hotter zone l52a 25 tank by an opening 304. The zones arealso con
to the colder zone l53a. to provide the amount of
nected through a circuit including a pipe 305
heated liquid required to maintain a desired tem
leading from the top of the hot zone, a pump 3,06
perature in the colder zone I53a. Colder return
and a return pipe 301 leading into the top of the,
liquid may be conveyed by a pipe I'Hla, or open~
colder zone and having a valve 308 controlled‘
ing, extending through the baiile l5la adjacent 30 thermostatically in accordance with the tempera
the bottom thereof to a space (not shown) similar
to the space I13 of Fig. 7.
Building or other space heating may be ob
ture in the colder zone by a thermostatic; bulb
356 located in the colder zone 303 and’ con?
nected as by electrical conductors 35! to the valve
tained by circulating heated liquid through a
368. A building heating circuit 310 leads from
heating circuit 185a generally similar to the cir 35 the ?rst circuit and is connected to a return 3l2
cuit I85, and having a space heater 186a, the
leading into the bottom of the tank, this latter
circulation being under control of a thermosta
circuit being controlled by a thermostatically
operated valve3l I.
tically actuated valve [81a actuated by a ther
mostat l88a in a manner generally similar to
A fire box 313 extends through the tank and
that described above.
has associated therewith a burner 3M. Disposed
The arrangements in which means are pro—
above the ?re box is a plurality of parallel fire.
tubes or ?ues 3i5 which extend entirely through
vided for- forced circulation of heated liquid be~
tween the hotter zone and the colder zone not
the tank and are connected at their front ends
only insure very positive control of the tempera
by a manifold de?ned by a breeching 3l6 re
ture in the portion of the water bath in which 45 movably secured on the front Wall of the tank.
the tubes carrying material to be heated are
At their rear ends, the ?re tubes extend through’
located but also make it possible to increase the
the rear wall 3|"! and are connected by a vertical
velocity of the liquid in that portion of the bath,
?ue or manifold 3l8 de?ned by a rear ?ue header
thereby increasing the heat exchange rate of
or manifold member 3I9 located removably on
the unit.
50 the outside of the rear wall of the tank. The
Control of the rate of thermal circulation be
member 3l9 is of double wall construction with‘v
tween the two zones of the water bath may-also
the space 320 therebetween being connected by
be obtained without the use of an external pump~
water-tight ?ttings 32! and 322 to the interior of
ing means such as above described. The two
the water chamber at the bottom and top of the
zones are connected by spacing the baffle from 55 hot zone.
the top and bottom walls of the tank or by
A liquid coil is disposed in the colder zone 303
forming the ba?le with openings adjacent the
top and bottom and the spaces or openings are
closed and opened by a damper controlled by a
thermostatically actuated bulb in a manner here
and includes pipes 323 connected at their ends by
return bends 324 and 325 disposed exteriorly of
the tank at the front and rear thereof respec
An insulating cover 326 may be provided
after explained. With such an arrangement,
which encloses the double-walled member 319
and the return bends 325.
,
when thermal circulation is desired in order to
pass heated liquid from the hotter zone to the
A manually controlled valve 321 may be pro
colder zone, the thermostatically controlled bulb
vided for opening communication through the
automatically opens the damper to allow transfer 65 partition 3!“ adjacent the top thereof, but this
of the heated liquid and when the desired tem
is not necessary in many cases.
perature is attained in the colder zone, auto
As previously stated, control of the rate of cir
matically closes the damper, thereby obtaining
culation between the two zones of the water bath
results similar to those obtained by controlling
may be obtained without the use of an external
the flow of liquid through an external pump 70 pumping means, but by a damper controlled by
circuit.
a thermostatically actuated bulb. Oneexample
The ?re box and surrounding water jacket may
of a heater in which control of the rate of cir
be extended through the rear wall of the tank
culation is thus obtained is illustrated in Fig. 13,v
in a manner similar to that in which the ?ues
in which the heater is similar in all respects to
illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7 extend through the
60 tively.
the heater illustrated in Figs. 9 to 11 inclusive
aeedoesf
11
and} above described, except that the external con
nection between the two zones is omitted and
thermally actuated means are provided for con
in which combustion also may take place. A gas '
inlet pipe 2I5-sleads into the manifold chamber
213 and a plurality of nozzles or burner heads. 2 l 6
communicating with the manifold chamber 2l3
trolling the damper 321. In this construction
the thermostatic bulb 350 is suitably connected C21 are mounted in the partition ‘H2 and terminate
in the ignition chamber 2M. A liquid fuel noz
as' by electrical connections 35m to an actuating
zle 2|’! extends through the front wall 2“ and
member» such as a solenoid‘ 352 for actuating
partition 212 and terminates in the ignition
the valve 321. The bulb 350 automatically opens
chamber 2l4. Preferably the gas nozzles 216 are
the damper 321 to allow transfer of heated liquid
and when the desired temperature is obtained in 10 arranged in distributed relation, as in a circle,
and the liquid fuel nozzle 21? is disposed cen
the colder zone 303 automatically closes the
trally of the arrangement of gas nozzles 2H3.
damper 321.
An ignition device 2l8 of any conventional
There» is illustrated‘ in Fig. 12 a novel burner,
form is mounted and preferably consists of the
including a control arrangement therefor, which
burner is capable of burning either gaseous fuel, , usual spark gap electrodes which are disposed in
position to ignite the fuel ejected from either the
or liquid fuel, or both simultaneously. The burn
gas nozzles 2H5 or the liquid fuel nozzle 21?.
er has particular advantages for use with systems
A primary air inlet 210 is provided in the side
wherein! the supply of gas may ?uctuate and‘ may
wall of the burner casing 205, preferably at the
not be suiiicient at times to provide the neces
upper portion thereof, and the air intake through
sary heat. For example, in a system for heat
the inlet is controlled by an adjustable air valve
ing sludge, wherein the gas generated in the di
of suitable construction. Preferably the air valve
gester is utilized for heating purposes, the gas
includes a shutter or de?ector (not shown) piv
thus generated may not be su?icient and it may
otly mounted in the casing 205 and having an
be desirable to utilize an additional source of fuel
, adjusting stud (not shown) connected thereto and
in order to maintain’ the‘ continuity of the di
extending through the side wall 2l0 whereby the
gesting process. For example, when undue colder
free end of the shutter can be moved toward or
weather is encountered there may not be suffi
away from the opening 210 to control the sides of
cient gas to maintain the digester temperature.‘
the passage de?ned between the shutter and the
With a drop in the digester temperature, the rate
. adjacent portion of the side wall. Secondary air
of gas production drops, further reducing the
is introduced into the combustion chamber pref—
gas available for heating. If this self-perpetu
erably by so mounting the casing 205 relative to
ating cycle continues, the lowered tank tempera
the combustion chamber that a space 223 is pro
ture will cause such a drop in the digester rate
vided which serves as a secondary inlet of gen
that the process may be almost completely halted.
erally annular form.
In cases such as this, it is necessary to supply heat
The operation of the burner may be controlled
from an auxiliary fuel source. The burner is also
by a suitable combination of standard electrical
highly suitable for installations where the gas
and pressure control devices. In a preferred
supply may be interrupted and it is desired to
mode of operation of the burner, gas is supplied
tain the heating operation until the gas supply 40 as the primary fuel and fuel oil is supplied as
have a standby source of fuel in order to main
can be re-established. On the other hand it
may be desirable for reasons of economy to utilize
oil as the primary fuel and to connect the burner
to a source of gas supply so that in the event
of the temporary exhaustion of the oil supply
the burner may continue in operation by burning
gas until the supply of oil has been’ re-estab
lished.
The burner» embodying the present invention
may be employed in any of the forms of heater
illustrated'herein and for the purpose of illustra
tion- there is shown in Fig. 1-2 a tank 200 gen
erally similar to the tank [6| shown in Fig. 6,
and having a ?re box 20! and ?re tube assembly
202 connected thereto in a manner generally
similar to the corresponding elements of Fig. 6,
the bath water circulating system being omitted,
the auxiliary or supplemental fuel. When the
supply of gas is sufficient, the pressure in the gas
supply line permits the gas to be supplied to the
gas nozzles and no oil is normally supplied to
,- the oil nozzle.
However, when the supply of gas
drops below the minimum required for produc
ing the desired heat, control means responsive to
the pressure of the gas in the gas supply line is
effective to supply oil to the liquid fuel nozzle.
The control arrangement is such that when the
gas pressure falls to below a minimum pressure
and it is necessary to supply oil, the gas is cut
off and only oil is supplied to the burner nozzle.
However, if desired the control means for the oil
supply may be actuated to supply oil simultane
ously with the gas when the pressure of the latter
falls below a certain value, or when the heating
demand is greater than the supply of gas alone
however. The ?re tube assembly 202- is con
will provide.
nected to an outlet 203- having an exhaust fan 204
A control system is controlled by thermostatic
(if)
for creating a draft in the usual manner.
means which causes the burner to operate at all
The burner includes a casing 205 which prefer
times when heat is necessary in the liquid bath.
ably is of generally cylindrical form and prefer
Moreover, safety devices are provided of a stand
ably is disposed outside of the combustion cham
ard type which close oif all fuel supply in the
ber 20l. The casing 205 is provided with an
event the system is calling for heat and the iiame
65
outlet opening 206 which registers with an open
does not burn or cannot be ignited automatically
ing 20'! leading into the combustion chamber 20 I.
Surrounding the opening 201, and disposed inside
of the combustion chamber 20! is a fire brick
tuyere 208 of generally annular shape and hav
ing a ?ared passage leading into the combustion
chamber.
The casing 205 includes a side wall 2l0, an end
wall 2| 1 and a partition 2 I 2, all de?ning an outer
or manifold chamber 2l3 and an inner or igni
by the system.
I
One suitable arrangement of control device for
effecting the foregoing operation of the burner is
illustrated somewhat diagrammatically in Fig. 12.
The gas supply line 2I5, which is connected to
a suitable source (not shown) of gas supply,
includes a switch 225 controlled by the pressure
of the gas supply by a diaphragm pressure device
tion chamber 2 M in which the fuel is ignited and 75 225a, a. pressure regulator 226 for maintaining a
13
2,586,998
uniform gas pressure at the gas nozzles, an elec
trically operated gas control valve 221 and a
manually operated gas control valve 228.
The oil supply line 230 includes an oil pump
23! driven by an electric motor 232 and a pres
14
open and permit gas to ?ow to the manifold
chamber 2 [3 in the manner above described.
If the heat requirements of the bath are satis
?ed at any time the thermostatically controlled
1 switch 235 is opened, thereby opening the circuit
through the valve 22‘! causing it to close and out
sure switch 233 controlled by the pressure of the
oil in the discharge line at 233. The oil pump
01f the gas supply. At the same time the circuit
motor 232 is controlled by a relay 234 which in
through the switch 225 is opened so that if the
turn is controlled by the pressure switch 225 so
relay 234 happens to be closed it will be opened
that when the gas pressure in the line 215 falls mil to de-energize the motor 232, or if it is opened,
below a predetermined minimum value the mo
it cannot be closed to energize the oil pump mo
tor 232 is energized to drive the oil pump 23L
tor 232. If, when the switch 235 is opened, the
The pressure switch 233 is connected to the gas
valve 221 happens to be closed, it will remain
control valve 22'! whereby when the pressure in
closed. The opening of the switch 235 also causes
the oil line at 233 reaches a predetermined mini
the starting relay 243 to open and thereby stop
mum value the valve 221 is closed to shut off
the exhaust fan motor_231 and de-energize the
the supply of gas.
ignition coil 242.
A switch 235 is provided for controlling the gas
If, when the main switch 24! is closed to start
control valve 221 and the relay 234 and is actu
the burner, the heat requirements of the system
ated by a thermostatic bulb 235 disposed in the
are satisfied, the system will be placed in condi
liquid bath and responsive to the temperature
tion to operate but will await the heat demand
thereof to actuate the switch 235. .
and will supply fuel and ignite the ?ame in ac
The suction fan 204 is driven by a motor 231
cordance with the demands indicated by the
which is controlled by a starting relay 240 con
thermostat in the water bath.
nected through a main switch 241! to a suitable Cl.
Preferably, suitable safety control means are
power supply.
provided for insuring that the fuel supply will
The spark gap 2 I8 is connected to a spark coil
be cut oif at any time if the ?ame should be
242 which is controlled by the starting relay 240
during normal operation.
The system is started by closing the main
extinguished and cannot immediately be re-estab
lished by the system.
Such a device is indicated
: diagrammatically at 245 and may include any
switch 24! . If the system is calling for heat, the
suitable type of safety control device for per
switch 235 is closed by the thermostat 235 and
forming the functions herein described, such as
energizes the coil of the starting relay 240 to close
the “Flame-Otrol” manufactured by the Wheelco
the latter. The fan motor 23'! is thereby ener
Instruments Company of ‘Chicago, Illinois.
gized to drive the exhaust fan 234. At the same ,1.
The safety control device 245 is connected to
time the ignition coil 242 is energized to provide
a ?ame rod or electrode 245 projecting through
a spark at the spark gap 218 for igniting the fuel.
the wall of the casing 255 and into position to be
The ignition coil 242 may be energized for a pre
disposed within the ?ames from one of the gas
determined period, for example, 25 seconds, dur
nozzles 2H3 and from the liquid fuel nozzle ‘2H.
ing the starting of the burner or it may be ener
The ?ame rod 246 is suitably connected in a
gized continuously so long as the system is in
known manner to the safety control device 245
operation. This may be accomplished in any well
and operates upon the well known electrical con
known manner.
ductivity of the ?ame principle to permit the
' If the pressure in the gas supply line 2 l 5 is su?i
various control circuits above described to be
cient, the pressure switch 225 is actuated to cause
completed so long as a ?ame is projected from
the electrically operated gas valve 221 to open
either of the nozzles. However, in the event that
and permit gas to pass into the manifold chamber
the unit should be calling for heat and no ?ame
2l3 and thence through the nozzles 2H5 into the
exists," the control device 245 is actuated to close
ignition chamber 2l4 where the gas is ignited
both the gas and oil fuel supply lines, but allows
by the spark gap 2 l5. The pressure regulator 226
the exhaust fan 234 to continue operating to purge
insures that the gas is supplied at uniform mini
the system of gas so long as the unit requires heat.
mum pressure to the manifold chamber 2 l 3.
If desired an alarm horn 241 may be provided
If the pressure in the gas line 2 l 5 is insu?‘icient
which also is actuated by the safety device 245 to
to support proper combustion or to provide the
sound an alarm when the above conditions exist.
su?icient combustion to meet the desired heat
The safety device 245 preferably includes means
requirements, the pressure actuated switch 225
for automatically re-cycling the system prior to
is operated to close the relay 234 and energize
sounding the alarm horn 241 in an attempt to re
the oil pump motor 232. When a predetermined
establish the ?ame. This is eifected by the safety
pressure, for example, around 90 lbs., is developed
device 245 which opens the gas line or oil line
in the oil supply line discharge at 233 the pres
(depending upon whether or not gas pressure in
sure actuated switch 233 opens the circuit through
the electrically operated gas valve 221 which
causes the valve to close and shut off the supply of
gas ‘to the manifold chamber 2l3. The burner
then continues to operate with the oil being sup
plied by the oil line 233 to the oil'nozzle 2 l2.
When the quantity of gas available increases to
the extent that a predetermination minimum
pressure is developed in the supply line 215, the
pressure actuated switch 225 is operated to open
the relay 234 and de-energize the oil pump mo
tor 232.
As soon as the oil pressure falls below
a predetermined value, for example, around 70
lbs., the pressure actuated switch 233 closes and
causes the electrically operated gas valve 221 to
the gas line 2 i 5 is su?icient) , energizing the igni
tion coil 242. If the ?ame cannot be re-estab
lished in this manner, the alarm horn 241 is
sounded. A manually operated push button
> switch 243 is provided which is connected to the
various controls above described in such manner
that the system can be re-cycled to re-establish
the flame after the system has been de-activated
by the operation of the safety device 245, and
the system does not succeed in automatically re
establishing the ?ame. However, if upon actu
ation of the push button switch 245 the ?ame
cannot be re-established, the safety device 245
will cause the entire system to be de-activated as
soon as the push button is released, and to re!
2,586,998‘ 7
15
main so until the, defect in the system which
caused .extinguishment of the ?ame can be cor
i6
?re tubes are readily accessible for cleaning and
thus any deposits can be periodically removed,
rected.
thereby prolonging the life of the tubes and, main
heater having many advantages. The arrange
ment of liquid coils is such that the liquid to be
heat transfer arrangement by which in several
It will be seen, from the foregoing that the
present invention provides a highly efficient
taining a high emciency of the ?re tube system.
The liquid bath provides a simple but e?icient
of the embodiments the heat from the ?re tubes
is’ conducted through the liquid of the bath by
heated can be circulated through the coils at a
conduction outwardly from the ?re tubes to the
velocity, which is based upon a circulation rate
which is both economical as to pumpage cost 10 liquid tubes and also by thermal circulation of
the bath liquid. In other embodiments thermal
and bene?cial to the process (as for example,
circulation or forced- circulation is employed and
the digester circulation where the heater is used
provides ef?cient utilization of the heat gener
in a sewage digestion system). This velocity
ated. Since the heat exchange liquid is main
preferably is su?icient to provide a maximum rate
of transfer of heat to the liquid to be heated. 15. tained in a closed system and need not be
changed’ there is a minimum of scale deposited on
Optimum heat transfer rates, when sludge has
the surface of the ?re tubes and liquid tubes and
been circulated through the heater, have been
thus a high ei?ciency is maintained and the. ne
obtained by circulating the sludge at from 1.5 to
cessity for shutting down the system to clean
5 feet per second. The liquid to be heated trav
erses a relatively long path through the water 20 scale from the tubes is reduced to a minimum.
Since the water is not changed, and only small
bath and thus is subjected to the heat of the
quantities of make up water are required, it may
bath for a relatively long period which permits
be softened and treated to inhibit corrosion with
the heating of the liquid to the desired tempera
very little expense. The invention also provides
ture without necessitating excessive temperatures
in the water bath. Since the liquid tubes are not
in direct contact with the hot gases the scorching
or caking of the contents of the liquid tubes is
prevented, even though the temperature of. the
hot gases is such that the scorching or caking
would take‘ place were it not for the interposed 30
a heater well suited to applications whereby heat
which may be generated by the available fuel in
excess of that required to heat the liquid mate—
rial may be utilized for other purposes, such as
space heating. On the other hand the system is
adapted to utilize heat from other sources than
the burningfuel, for example, the heat from en
liquid of the water bath. Moreover, the rapid
gine cooling systems such as is oftenavailable in
velocity of flow’ of the liquid to be heated serves
plants utilizing the heatersv of the general type
to flush or scour the liquid tubes and thus in
to which this invention relates.
hibit the caking of the material being circulated
I believe that the operation and advantages of
35
through these tubes.
my
invention will be well appreciated from the
The liquid tubes are so arranged in the several
foregoing description, and it is to be understood
different embodiments as to permit convenient
that, while I have shown and described several
cleaning or replacement of the tubes without the
forms of my. invention, other details and ar
necessity for completely disassembling the unit
rangements of parts may be. resorted to without
and with the minimum of lost operating time. In
departingfrom the spirit and scope of my inven
those cases where the return bends are disposed
tion as defined by the claims that follow.
exteriorly of the’ tank, the former can be readily
I claim:
removed to permit access to the interior of the
1. A heater‘ for heating liquids containing di
corresponding tubes or complete removal of such
tubes. Where the return bends are disposed 45 gestible organic wastes comprising a tank for
con?ning a bath liquid, a burner, a combustion
wholly within the tank, the entire assembly can
chamber extending from-said burner and includ
be quickly removed to permit cleaning or replace—
ing a plurality of ?re tube sections extending
ment of the liquid tubes.
~
through said bath liquid‘for passing heated gases
The various arrangements of ?re box and fire
tube assemblies permit e?icient and complete 50 therethrough, and a conduit of generally serpen
tine form for passing material to be‘, heated
utilization of the heat produced by the available
through and in heat exchange relation with said
fuel under various conditions of use and the
bath liquid, said conduit including a plurality of
heater therefore is capable of many and varied
applications. The long path provided by the ser
pentine type of ?re tubes permits complete com
bustion and full utilization of a high percentage
of the heat available even where the gases are
passed through the ?re tubes at relatively high
velocity. On the other hand where conditions
pipe sections disposed in generally parallel rela
tion and extending through said bath liquid,
and mounted in the walls of said tank, in sealing
relation therewith, and one-piece return bends
connecting the ends of adjacent conduit sections,
said return bends at least at one end of said tank
are such that the gases pass through the ?re 60 each being detachably secured in position exter
tubes at lower velocities the parallel arrangement
of ?re tubes can be employed which minimizes
the loss of head in the fire tubes. The several ?re
box and ?re tube assemblies permit use of the
heater in applications where natural draft, suc
tion induced draft, or pressure ?ring is employed,
whichever may be best suited to the particular
application. Owing to the fact that the ?re tubes
are in contact with the bath water and not with
the pipes containing the material to be heated
the combustion gases in the fire tubes are not
cooled to such an extent as to cause substantial
condensation therein with the accompanying
deleterious deposition of moisture and sulphur
compounds within the ?re tubes. Moreover, the
nally of said tank, for removal while the bath
liquid remains in said tank.
2. A heater for heating liquids containing di
gestible organic wastes comprising, a tank for
containing a bath liquid, a substantially vertical
partition dividing said tank into a heated com
partment and a heating compartment lying en
tirely at one. side the plane‘ of said vertical parti
tion from.» said heated compartment, means pro
viding communication between said compart
ments at the top and bottom portions respec
tively thereof, a combustion chamber in the
lower portion of said heated compartment, a se
ries of parallel ?re tubes disposed above and con
nected to said combustion chamber. said series,
17
2,586,998
of ?re tubes extending close to the top of said
18
heated compartment, 2. series of parallel conduit
sections disposed in and extending close to the
top and bottom respectively of said heating com
partment, and means serially connecting said
said wall means connecting said portions for cir
culation of said bath liquid therebetween, and
means for controlling the rate of circulation of
bath liquid between said portions to maintain a
predetermined temperature in said ?rst portion,
conduit sections.
said last means including'a valve in one of said
-
3. A heater for heating liquids containing di
gestible organic wastes comprising, a tank- for
passages, a thermostatic bulb in said ?rst portion
of said bath liquid, and means connecting said
containing a bath liquid and having a partition
bulb and valve for controlling the opening and
dividing it into a heated compartment and a heat 10 closing of said valve in accordance with the tem
ing compartment, a conduit extending through
perature of the bath liquid in said ?rst portion.
said heating compartment for circulating through
' 7. A heater for heating liquids containing di
said bath liquid and conduit a second liquid to
gestible organic wastes comprising, a tank for
be heated, means for heating said bath liquid in
containing a bath liquid, wall means dividing said
cluding a combustion chamber and ?re tubes 15 tank into a ?rst portion through which the liquid
extending through said tank for circulating heat
to be heated is circulated and a second portion
ing gases through said bath, and an external
in which heat is supplied to the bath liquid, con
circulating system connected between said com
duit means extending through said ?rst portion
partments and including a heat exchanger ex
for circulating therethrough said liquid to be
' ternally of said tank for utilizing any heat in the 20 heated, means for heating the bath liquid in said
bath liquid in excess of that required to maintain
second portion, means including a conduit con
the desired temperature of the second liquid pass
necting said bath portions and a pump for air
ing through said conduit.
culating said bath liquid between said portions.
4. A heater for heating liquids containing di
and means including a valve in said last-named
gestible organic Wastes comprising, 'a tank for 25 conduit and a thermostatic element disposed in
containing a bath liquid held at a predetermined
said ?rst portion and responsive to the tempera
temperature, means for heating said bath, and
ture of the bath liquid in said portion for actuate
a conduit extending through said tank for circu
ing said valve to control the rate of circulation of
lating through said bath liquid and conduit a
both liquid between said portions to maintain ‘a
second liquid to be heated containing digestible 30 predetermined temperature in said ?rst portion.
organic wastes, said conduit including a plurality
8. A heater for heating liquids containing 'di
-of' generally straight, parallel pipe sections ex
gestible organic wastes, comprising a tank for
tending in said tank between two opposite ends
con?ning a bath liquid and having separated
thereof, means connecting said sections serially
heated and heating compartments, conduit means
at both ends to provide therewith a generally
extending exteriorly of said tank for connecting
serpentine path through said bath for said second
said compartments for circulation of the bath
liquid, said means including unitary return bends
liquid therebetween, means for controlling the
each connecting adjacent ends of said sections,
rate of circulation of bath liquid, a burner,'a com
the return bends at one end of said tank, at least,
bustion chamber and ?re tubes extending from
each being located exteriorly of said tank and 40 said burner and through said heated section for
» each detachable as an entity and providing ac
cess to the interiors of each of said sections from
passing heated gases therethrough, and a conduit
for passing material to be heated through said
the outside of said tank, whereby said sections
heating compartment, said conduit including a
can be cleaned while the bath liquid is in said
plurality of pipe sections disposed in generally
tank.
45 parallel relation and extending through said'heat
5. A heater for heating liquids containing di
ing compartment, and readily removable return
gestible organic wastes comprising, a tank for
bends disposed exteriorly of said bath liquid and
containing a liquid forming a bath, a conduit
tank and serially connecting the ends of adjacent
means. extending through. a ?rst portion of said
said conduit sections at both ends of said tank.
bath for circulating therethrough, in separated 50 9. A heater for heating liquids containing di
relation to the bath liquid, a liquidto be heated,
gestible organic wastes comprising a tank for
means for. heating the bath liquid in a second
containing a bath liquid, a conduit extending
portion of said bath, means connecting said bath
through said bath liquid for circulating there
portions for circulation of the bath liquid there
through a second liquid to be heated, means for
between, and means responsive to the tempera 55 heating said bath liquid including a substantially
ture of the bath liquid in said ?rst portion of the
straight elongated combustion chamber in said
bath for controlling the rate of circulation of bath
bath liquid, a plurality of ?re tubes extending
liquid between said portions to maintain a pre
through said tank and through opposite end walls
determined temperature in said ?rst portion, said
thereof, an exhaust manifold communicating with
last means including a valve in said connecting 60 the corresponding ends of said ?re tubes ex
means and thermostatic means in said ?rst por
teriorly of one of said end walls, an extension ‘of
tion of the bath for controlling the opening and
closing of said valve in accordance with the tem
said combustion chamber communicating with
portion for circulating therethrough, in separated
ing a tank for containing a bath liquid, means
including a combustion chamber and ?re tubes
said combustion chamber and the other ends of
perature of the bath liquid in said ?rst portion.
said ?re tubes adjacent and exteriorly of the
6. A heater for heating liquids containing di 65 other of said end walls, a jacket for containing
gestible organic wastes comprising, a tank for
bath liquid surrounding said combustion cham-'
containing a bath liquid, Wall means dividing said
ber extension, and connections between’said tank
bath liquid into a ?rst portion through which a
and the interior of said jacket for circulating the
liquid to be heated is circulated and a second
bath liquid therebetween.
portion in which heat is supplied to the bath 70
10. A heater for heating liquids containing di
liquid, conduit means extending through said ?rst
gestible organic wastes comprising, means includ
relation to the bath liquid, said liquid to be
heated, means for heating the bath liquid in said
extending through said bath liquid for heating
a second portion, upper and lower passages through 75 said bath liquid, and a conduit extending through,
2,586,998
20
19
con?ning a‘ bath liquid and de?ning separate ?rst
said bath liquid for circulating through said bath
liquid a second liquid to be heated, and including
and second tank portions, said means including
spaced parallel end walls and side walls extending
between said end walls, a plurality of conduit
sections disposed in the ?rst of said tank portions
for passing therethrough liquids to be heatedand
extending in parallel relation between and
a plurality of parallel tubes extending in said bath
liquid and mounted in and extending through the
end walls of said tank and a plurality of internally
unobstructed, unitary return bends serially con
necting said tubes, said return bends at least at
one end of said tank each being detachably se
cured in position externally of said bath liquid
and tank and each removable as a unit.'
mounted in said end walls,- a plurality of one
piece return bends connectingthe ends oi- ad
10 jacent conduit sections and detachably secured
to the corresponding, end wall, means for heating
11. A heater for heating liquids containing di
said bath liquid including a burner, means for
gestible organic wastes comprising, a tank for
passing heated gases in heat exchange relation
containing a bath liquid, a conduit extending
with said bath liquid in the second of said tank
through said tank for circulating through a ?rst
zone of said bath liquid a second liquid to be 15 portions removed from said conduit sections,>and
means for circulating heated bath liquid between
heated including a plurality of pipe sections in
said bath portions.
said bath liquid and return bends connecting the
15. A heater for heating liquids containing di
ends of said pipe sections, the return bends at
gestible organic wastes comprising, av tank for
one end of said tank being located externally of
the tank and readily removable, means for heat 20 containing a'bath liquid, wall means dividing
said tank into a ?rst portion through which the
ing said bath liquid including a combustion cham
liquid to be heated is circulated and asecond
ber disposed in a second, separate and distinct
zone of said bath liquid, a ?re tube manifold lead— . portion in_ which heat is supplied to the bath
liquid, conduit means extending through said ?rst
ingvfrom said combustion chamber, a water jack
et around at least a portion of said combustion 25 portion for circulating therethrough saidliquid
to be heated, means for heating the bath liquid
chamber, and means for circulating bath liquid
between said Zones including a ?rst conduit ex
tending from said second zone to said ?rst zone
in said second portion, means including a conduit
connecting said bath portions and a pump for
to the end walls thereof, and unitary, generally
semi-toric return bends connecting the ends of
adjacentofsaid sections, with the return bends
for controlling the circulation of bath liquid
circulating said bath liquid between said portions,
and externally of said tank, and a second conduit
extending from said ?rst zone and internally of 30 means including a valve in said last-named con
duit and a thermostatic element disposed in said
said bath liquid to said water jacket.
?rst portion and responsive to the temperature.
12. A heater for heating liquids containing di
of the bath liquid in said portion for actuating
gestible organic wastes comprising, a closed tank
said valve to control the rate of circulation of bath
for containing a bath liquid, means for heating
said bath liquid, and a ‘conduit extending through '- ~ liquid between said portions to maintain a pre
determined temperature in said ?rst portion, a
said tank for circulating through said bath liquid
second means connecting saidportions for cir
a second liquid to be heated, said conduit includ
culation of bath liquid therebetween, and a
ing a plurality of straight, substantially parallel
manually operable valve in said connecting means
pipe sections extending in said tank and secured
therethrough.
HARRY E. SCHLENZ.
at least at one end of said tank disposed 6X?
teriorly of said tank and detachable each as a
REFERENCES CITED
single unit, thereby providing ready access to the
The following references are of record in-the
interior of said conduit whereby the latter can
?le of this patent:
be cleaned while in position in said tank and
UNITED STATES PATENTS
while said bath liquid is in said tank.
Number
Name.
Date
13. A heater for heating liquids containing di
337,506
Lagosse ___________ __ Mar. 9, 1886
gestible organic wastes comprising, a tank for 60
containing a bath liquid, a substantially vertical
partition dividing said tank into a heated com
partment and a heating compartment at one side
oisaid heated compartment, openings adjacent
the top and bottom of said partition respectively
providing communication between said compart
ments, a combustion chamber and ?re tubes ex
tending in said heated compartment, a conduit
extending in said heating compartment for pass
ing a second liquid to be heated therethrough, and
manually operable valve means in one of said
openings for adjustably controlling the ?ow of
liquid therethrough and thereby the circulation
of bath liquid between said compartments.
v14. A heater for heating liquids containing di .65
gestible organic wastes comprising, means for
498,239
1,751,533
1,768,992
1,838,266
Coignet __________ __ May 30,
Taylor ___________ __ Mar. 25,
Martin ___________ __ July 1,
Kreager __________ __ Dec. 29,
1893
1930
1930
1931
1,940,973
Sharp ___________ __ Dec. 26, 1933
1,980,424
2,055,949
2,070,182
2,073,825
2,135,275
2,268,871
2,330,191
2,353,201
Morgan __________ __ Nov. 13,
Sharp ___________ __ Sept. 29,
Saatho? __________ __ Feb. 9,
Beck et al _________ __ Mar. 16,
Cannon ___________ __ Nov. 1,
Hall ______________ __ Jan. 6,
Beckett __________ __ Sept. 28,
Talbot ____________ __ July 11,
1934
1936
1937
1937
1938
1942
1943
1944
2,354,932
Walker et al _______ __ Aug.v 1, 1944
2,455,988
Fife ______________ __ Dec. 14, 1948
Frisch et al _______ __ July 12, 1949
2,475,604
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