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DESCRIPTION JPH0646497

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DESCRIPTION JPH0646497
[0001]
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to an
acoustic transducer array, in particular for electrically connecting the array to circuit elements
such as substrates or cables and for substantially eliminating spurious acoustic reflections. In
particular, it relates to the backing layer used in such arrays.
[0002]
Acoustic transducer arrays, in particular ultrasound transducer arrays, can be arranged in several
configurations, including linear, one-dimensional arrays, matrix two-dimensional arrays, annular
ring arrays, and the like. In the case of a one-dimensional array, it is possible to connect the leads
to the transducer using the technique described in US Pat. No. 4,404,489, but this technique is
all for a two-dimensional array not compatible. In particular, referring to FIG. 1 which illustrates
the general prior art, there is shown a linear array 15 of transducing elements 13 spaced apart
and connected to the conductive leads 18 at their bottom surface, respectively. The leads 18 may
be independent leads conductively coupled to the conductive contact area of the surface 17, but
preferably printed circuit leads that make ohmic contact to match the contact area of the device.
The front side (back side) 17 provides structural support for the array and is fixed to a backing
22 that allows impedance matching and acoustic attenuation for reasons to be described later.
The leads 18 are connected to the plated through holes 20 or contacts or flexible cables on the
substrate by flow soldering, pressure or other suitable means. Output conductive leads or traces
11 on printed circuit board 19 extend from each hole / contact 20.
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1
[0003]
Typically, when the piezoelectric element 13 is provided, the sound waves are transmitted from
both the front surface 21 and the back surface 17 of the element. The surface 21 is generally
provided with one or more impedance matching layers to enhance the path of the ultrasound
signal from the surface to the body being scanned and to minimize reflections from the element /
body interface. However, the situation on the back or surface 17 is more complicated. If there is
an impedance mismatch at this surface (ie if the acoustic impedance of the piezoelectric crystal
element 13 is significantly different from the acoustic impedance of the support 22 to which it is
attached), an acoustic reflection within the element at surface 17 will occur. become. As a result,
the power output from the transducer in the desired direction is improved, but the width of the
acoustic output pulse is increased, thus degrading the resolution of the ultrasound image.
Depending on the application, the wide choice of this pulse can be overcome by appropriate
choice of the impedance matching layer on the surface 21.
[0004]
Furthermore, the acoustic signal passing through the surface 17 may be reflected off the circuit
board 19 and returned to the transducer if not attenuated. Thus, a mechanism is provided to
control or eliminate reflections at the surface 17 of the conversion element, to provide the
desired balance between output power and image sharpness, and to significantly attenuate the
acoustic signal generated at the surface 17 It is desirable to prevent reflections that degrade the
image of the signal back to the conversion element. The support 22 is configured to perform
these functions in addition to providing structural support. However, the approach shown in FIG.
1 is only adapted for use with one dimensional arrays. If this technique is to be used in a twodimensional array, leads 11 and 18 will contact two or more transducer elements, essentially
shorting these elements or if the array is toothed, the perimeter of the array It will be connected
only with the element in Thus, contact can be made between the conductive area under each
transducer element of the two-dimensional array and the corresponding contacts such as circuit
boards, strips, semiconductor elements (i.e. chips, wafers, layers etc) It will be necessary.
Currently, techniques exist to perform such electrical contacts, but are not easily achievable.
There is currently no method that can realize the contact and at the same time benefit from the
support 22.
[0005]
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2
Thus, in general, there is a need for an improved method and apparatus for making electrical
contact between an acoustic transducer array, in particular, a two-dimensional acoustic
transducer array and corresponding contacts or traces of an electrical circuit element. There is. If
such a technique is realized, the acoustic energy output from the element is sufficiently
attenuated rather than reflecting all or a selected portion of the acoustic energy generated on the
back surface of each transducer It is possible to ensure that no significant energy reflections
return substantially to the conversion element. Also, acoustic energy entering the lead of the
transducer is minimized or eliminated, and such energy entering the lead is also sufficiently
attenuated to substantially return the energy returned to the transducer by reflection. It should
be gone, or one of them. Finally, these techniques also provide a solid support for the array.
[0006]
OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to overcome the abovementioned problems and to provide an electrical contact between a two-dimensional acoustic
transducer array and corresponding contacts or traces of an electrical circuit element.
[0007]
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a transducer assembly
comprising an acoustic transducer array, electronic circuitry and a support for interfacing the
array with the circuitry.
The circuit elements can be printed circuit boards, flexible cables, semiconductor elements (ie,
chips, wafers, layers, etc.) or other elements capable of electrical contact. The acoustic transducer
array is a one-dimensional array or a two-dimensional array, with each array having a first
acoustic impedance and electrical contacts on the back and its back. The circuit element has a
contact for each conversion element. The support is comprised of a block of acoustic attenuating
material having an acoustic impedance of a value related to the first acoustic impedance on its
top surface, with selected portions of the acoustic energy at the back of each element passing
through the block. If the acoustic impedances of the block and the conversion element are
substantially matched, almost all of the acoustic energy at the back of the converter is coupled to
the block. If the acoustical impedances of the transducing element and the block do not match, a
selected portion of the acoustic energy on the back will couple to the block, which will be a
function of the degree of acoustic mismatch.
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[0008]
At least one conductor for each transducer element extends through the block between its top
and bottom surfaces and the conductors of adjacent transducer elements do not make electrical
contact. Capacitive coupling between the conductors can be prevented by applying insulation to
the conductor with a low dielectric constant material. The support also includes means for
making electrical contact on the top surface between the electrical contacts on the back of each
element and the at least one corresponding conductor. Finally, the support also includes means
for making electrical contact between the circuit contacts for each conversion element and at
least one corresponding conductor. The acoustic impedance of the block can be uniform
throughout the block or can be different in different regions of the block. That is, if the conductor
has a second acoustic impedance and a given speed of sound, then the acoustic impedance of the
entire block substantially matches the second acoustic impedance and / or has a speed of sound
sufficiently lower than that of the wire. Causes the acoustic energy to withdraw from the
conductor and is further attenuated within the block. Instead, the acoustic impedance of the
block area adjacent to its top surface is matched, for example, to the acoustic impedance of the
conversion element or, to realize this function, the lower area of the block is provided by the
conductor while providing the matching layer. It is also possible to have acoustic properties that
facilitate the removal of acoustic energy. Such removal may plate or clad the wire core with a low
sound velocity material to form a reverse waveguide or anti-waveguide and / or coat the wire
with a coating of insulating material or low sound velocity material It becomes easy by applying.
Also, for each element, including the cover, it is possible to provide a rod of sound attenuating
material surrounding the conductor, which rod has a lower speed of sound compared to the ear
or plating, cladding, insulator or other cover, It is preferred to match the impedance with the
external wire / cover in contact with it. It is possible to make an interconnection of the rod with
epoxy or other sound attenuating material.
[0009]
It is possible to provide a single conductor or multiple conductors for each element. When a
plurality of conductors are provided, each conductor is preferably sufficiently thin. Thus, the
acoustic energy does not couple substantially with the conductor. In an embodiment of the
invention, the block is formed of a three-dimensional woven reinforcement fabric impregnated
with a sound attenuating material, and a portion of the fabric extending between the top and
bottom of the block is electrically conductive It is. In such an embodiment, it is preferable to
provide sufficient space between the electrical contacts of adjacent transducer elements, and the
conductive fabric forming the conductor of each element is the electrical contact of the element
and substantially the entire area thereof. There is no acoustic or electrical cross talk between the
13-04-2019
4
fabric of adjacent elements when in contact across The present invention aims to reduce the
acoustic energy coupled from the transducing element to the conductor, thus reducing the need
to remove such energy. This can be achieved by forming the conductor thin enough so that the
acoustic energy is hardly coupled. Additionally or alternatively, it is possible to make use of the
fact that the acoustic energy output from the back of each transducer element is maximal at the
center of the back and small at the edge of the element. Therefore, by positioning the support
conductor of each transducer element away from the center of the back of the element, the
acoustic energy coupled to the conductor can be reduced. In particular, the conductors may be
arranged substantially at the corners of the corresponding back side, or arranged to be in contact
with conducting tabs extending in the area located below the non-acoustic energy emitting space
between adjacent transducer elements it can.
[0010]
The electrical contact between the top surface of the support and the electrical contacts of the
conversion element results in a pattern of electrical contacts on the top surface of the support
relative to the electrical conductors of the element that matches the pattern of electrical contacts
on the lower side of the transducer array It can be done by forming. It is likewise possible to
form on the bottom of the support a pattern of electrical contacts which substantially
corresponds to the contact pattern of the circuit element. Also, each conductor extends beyond
the bottom of the block and is physically and electrically connected to the corresponding
electronic circuit contact. The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the
present invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred
embodiments of the invention as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.
[0011]
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIGS. 2 and 3, there
are shown respective embodiments of the present invention for two-dimensional and onedimensional acoustic transducer arrays. The transducer array 25a shown in FIG. 3 is
substantially the same as the assembly shown in FIG. 1, and the printed circuit board, strip,
semiconductor element or the like 19a ("circuitry" on which the transducer array 15a and the
leads 11 are formed Element)). The leads 11 may not be used in direct contact with the
semiconductor device and in the case of other selected applications. The difference is the support
27a between the transducer array and the circuit board with the leads (not shown) embedded
therein. To facilitate connection, circuit element traces 11 are provided with contacts 29a.
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[0012]
Similarly, the transducer assembly 25b shown in FIG. 2 includes a two-dimensional matrix array
15b of transducer elements 13 and a circuit element 19b with printed contacts, plated holes or
other contacts 29b for each transducer element. And the transducer array and the circuit board
are separated by a support 27b. Each support 27 (i.e., 27a or 27b) comprises a top or surface 31
and a bottom or surface 33. A contact 35 is provided on the top surface of each conversion
element, and an electrical contact formed on the bottom surface of each conversion element by
the method described later is also provided. As is apparent at this point, the array 15a of FIG. 3
comprises seven conversion elements 13 as shown, and the array 15b of FIG. 2 comprises
elements in a 7.times.6 matrix. These figures are for illustration purposes only. In an actual
system, the one-dimensional array 15a may include 48 to 512 conversion elements 13, and the
two-dimensional array 15b may, for example, be an array of 64 × 64, 128 × 128, or 128 × 12.
It can be equipped.
[0013]
FIGS. 4-9 illustrate portions of an embodiment of a transducer assembly 25 suitable for use as
the assembly 25a or 25b in FIGS. First, in FIG. 4, the support 27 is formed from a block of
acoustic energy attenuating material, and the conductors 39 of the block extend from the top
surface 31 to the bottom surface 33. In the case of the configuration of FIG. 2 or FIG. 3, at least
one conductor 39 is provided for each conversion element 13. The block 37 is formed, for
example, of an epoxy material provided with a sound absorber such as tungsten, silica,
chloroprene particles or bubbles and an acoustic scatterer. In the case of the embodiment shown
in FIG. 4, both the top 31 and bottom 33 are first metallized with a conductive material and the
metal is etched by photolithography or other standard techniques, laser scrubbing or other Top
surface 31 is removed by known methods leaving contact 35 in physical and electrical contact
with conductor 39 protruding from block 37 and bottom surface 33 is in physical and electrical
contact with conductor 39 at bottom surface 33 Leaving electrical contacts 41. The transducer
array 15, the circuit board 19 and the support 27 are then assembled, the contacts 35 making
physical and electrical contacts with the contacts 43 formed in the standard way on the
underside of the transducer array 15, the contacts 41 make physical and electrical contact with
the contacts 22 of the circuit board 19. Epoxy or other compatible adhesive can also be applied
and bonded to one or both surfaces prior to assembly of the array. Alternatively, after assembly,
an adhesive may be injected between the support 27 and each of the other assembly elements to
bond the assembly. The adhesive is preferably a non-conductive adhesive to avoid short circuits
and cross-talks between adjacent elements, and the layer of adhesive between adjacent contacts
13-04-2019
6
35 and 43 and between adjacent contacts 22 and 41 Thin enough (less than 2 microns is
preferred) so as not to cause significant electrical or acoustical impedance at these junctions. Due
to the irregularity of the contact surface, physical and electrical contact can be made via such a
thin adhesive layer. Instead, hold the three components 15, 19 and 27 of the transducer
assembly under pressure by means of an external housing or other suitable means known to
those skilled in the art without adhesive to ensure good electrical contact It is also possible.
Furthermore, in the case of FIG. 4, each contact 22, 35, 41, 43 appears to be relatively thick
compared to the other components, but such thickness is mainly to make the contacts visible in
the figure. As shown, in the case of practical devices, the contacts are microscopically thin,
generally less than a few microns thick.
[0014]
In addition to providing acoustic attenuation properties, the material of block 37 has an acoustic
impedance and / or speed of sound selected to achieve the desired result. For example, if a
narrow acoustic pulse from the array 15 is desired, then the material of block 37 is typically
selected to have an acoustic impedance that substantially matches the acoustic impedance of the
transducer element 13. Among other things, if such alignment is not possible, an alignment layer
may be provided between the conversion element and the support to enhance the alignment.
Keeping the adhesive layer between the conversion element 13 and the support 27 sufficiently
thin so as not to affect acoustically, substantially all acoustic energy emitted from the surface 17
of the conversion element 13 propagates to the block 37 , Will be attenuated. If an increase in
power is desired, and if the matching of the load on surface 21 is compatible, then the material of
block 37 can be selected to be not as impedance matched with conversion element 13 as desired.
. The material and thickness of the block 37 are chosen such that the acoustic energy coupled
into the block is completely or almost completely attenuated and the reflection of the acoustic
energy coupled into the block hardly reaches the transducing element.
[0015]
One of the potential problems mentioned above is that, usually assuming that conductor 39 is
thick enough to couple acoustic energy, such as when a single conductor is used for each
element, The energy is transmitted to the circuit element 19 with little attenuation, and a
considerable part of the energy is reflected from the circuit element 19 back to the conductor 39
and transmitted to the conversion element 13 via the conductor, It means that an artificial factor
will occur in the display signal. This problem can be overcome by forming a block 37 of material
with appropriate acoustical properties.
13-04-2019
7
[0016]
The acoustic properties of concern in removing acoustic energy from the wire (as a result, energy
is attenuated in the block) are the relative acoustic impedances of the material of the wire and
the support, and the relative velocity of sound of such material. It is. That is, as mentioned above,
impedance matching between the wire and the support facilitates the flow of acoustic energy
from the wire to the support. However, this alone may not be sufficient to extract most of the
acoustic energy from the wire. To further facilitate this process, it is desirable that the speed of
sound of the wire be substantially greater than the speed of sound of the support or at least the
portion of the support surrounding the wire. This causes the wire and the support to act as a
reverse or anti-waveguide, and the relative sound velocity of the core and the outer shell is
opposite to that of the acoustic waveguide so that the acoustic energy is Rather than being
returned to the wire as in the case of a waveguide, it will be directed out of the wire.
[0017]
The desired difference in the speed of sound can be obtained in several ways. One method is to
form the material of the support 37 with a material having a lower speed of sound than the wire,
as shown in FIG. To further facilitate the removal of acoustic energy from the wire, the core wire
is plated, clad, coated or otherwise coated with a material having a lower speed of sound than the
core wire as shown in FIG. Next, the coated wire is embedded in a carrier material 37 which
preferably has an acoustic impedance that substantially matches the acoustic impedance of the
outer material of the coated wire and a lower speed of sound than the coating material. The outer
coating formed on the wire can be a conductive material, but preferably it is an insulating
material. One of the advantages of utilizing an insulating material for this purpose, in particular a
material with a low dielectric constant, is that not only the desired sound velocity can be
obtained between the wire and its outer coating, but otherwise closely spaced wires Point to
provide additional isolation between the wires to avoid RF or other capacitive coupling that may
occur. Suitable materials for achieving the desired sound velocity include copper or steel for
aluminum plated or clad conducting wires and / or glass, plastic or rubber used for insulation. It
is also possible to utilize cladding or plating that has a lower sound velocity than the wire and to
provide insulation with a lower sound velocity to further accelerate the removal of acoustic
energy from the wire.
[0018]
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8
Block most of the acoustic energy from conductor 39 by providing at least a sonically reduced
layer extending out of each wire at the junction with the outer wire coating and the support in
conjunction with the matching of the acoustic impedance. It can be coupled to 37 where the
energy can be attenuated. Thus, reflections through the wire are substantially eliminated.
However, as long as the difference between the acoustic impedance of the conversion element 13
and the acoustic impedance of the conductor 39 is thus considerable, the difference between the
acoustic impedance of the block 37 to which these impedances are matched is considerable.
Inside, reflection occurs on the surface 17 and the quality of the output is degraded. One way in
which the impedance mismatch at the surface 17 can be resolved is to form the block 37 of a
material having an acoustic impedance between the transducer element 13 and the conductor
39. This facilitates the coupling of a portion of the acoustic energy from the conductor 39 to the
block 37 at the same time as the reflection of the surface as a result of the acoustic impedance
mismatch is reduced. However, if the acoustic impedance mismatch between the transducing
element and the conductor 39 is significant, this option can not obtain an acceptable pulse width
or an acceptable level of energy coupling from the wire. .
[0019]
FIG. 5 shows an embodiment of the invention which solves this problem by forming a block 37 of
two separate material layers. The material of the upper layer 37a of the block is a material
having an acoustic impedance that substantially matches the acoustic impedance of the
conversion element 13, whereby the acoustic impedance of the back surface 17 is substantially
coupled to the block portion 37a. It is desirable that the material of this block portion also have
sufficient sound attenuation to substantially attenuate the coupled acoustic energy. Portion 37a
may be a thin acoustic matching layer, but again preferably has a thickness sufficient to dampen.
Block portion 37b may be formed of a material specifically designed to attenuate the acoustic
energy of the wire. This material has an acoustic impedance that substantially matches the
acoustic impedance of the wire 39, so that the acoustic energy coupled to the wire can be fed
into the blocking layer 37b, which can be attenuated. As mentioned above, this layer is also
preferably provided with a speed of sound suitable to facilitate the transfer of such energy, the
wire being formed as a reverse waveguide and / or a coating to further facilitate this process. It is
preferable to be applied.
[0020]
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9
One potential problem with the structure shown in FIG. 5 is that reflection of acoustic energy
occurs at the junction of layers 37a and 37b. Layer 37a therefore has a thickness sufficient to
substantially attenuate coupled acoustic energy, such energy being reflected twice at the junction
between the two layers, as long as the acoustic energy is reflected at the junction between the
two layers. Passing through attenuates completely or substantially completely. Alternatively, one
or more impedance matching layers may be provided between layer 37a and layer 37b to
minimize reflections at the layer junctions or to gradually change the mixing of materials for the
middle region of block 37. It is also possible that the acoustic impedance transition caused by
sharp reflections does not occur in the block. Thus, by providing multiple independent layers in
block 37, or by gradually changing the acoustic impedance at the depth of block 37, or
combining these methods, bonding of surfaces 17 and 31 for pulse width and power control It is
possible to minimize the acoustic reflection, including the reflection through the conductor 39,
while at the same time optimizing the acoustic matching at the part. In FIG. 5, instead of the
contacts 22 and 41, the conductors 39 are extended beyond the end of the block 37 and these
extended conductors pass through the plated through holes 45 of the circuit board 19 and solder
Also shown is another alternative of the arrangement according to the invention, in which the
extended leads are fixed in the plated through holes by standard means known to those skilled in
the art and the like.
[0021]
FIG. 6 shows another embodiment of the invention which differs from the previous embodiment
in two respects. First, instead of forming the blocks 37 in multiple layers, each conductor 39a is
embedded, coated or otherwise surrounded with a material 37c and bonded by an acoustically
damped epoxy or other compatible material 37d The block is formed by forming the rod.
Preferably, the material 37c is impedance matched with the material of the conductor 39a, and
has a lower speed of sound than the material of the conductor, so that the acoustic energy
coupled to the conductor 39a can be removed and attenuated. The interconnect material 37d is a
material with an acoustic impedance suitable to achieve the desired degree of matching with the
transducer element 13. In fact, since the rod formed by the material 37c is relatively thin, most
of the material of the block 37 is the material 37d, which allows good acoustic matching with the
transducing element. Thus, the embodiment of FIG. 6 has substantially the same advantages as
the embodiment of FIG. 5 as far as acoustic matching is achieved and reflection is minimized.
Further, the conductors 39a of FIG. 6 are two or more independent conductors braided with each
other as shown. The advantage of utilizing multiple conductors is that as the individual wires are
thinner, the acoustic coupling to the wires is reduced. If the conductor 39a comprises enough
conductors to allow sufficient conduction, while at the same time the individual conductors are
each thin enough to cause substantially no acoustic energy coupling, the material 37c is not
needed there is a possibility. Thus, the block 37 can be configured as shown in FIG. 4 and the
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10
impedance matching between the transducer element and the block is the most important
consideration in selecting the acoustic impedance of the block. When a configuration as shown in
FIG. 6 is used for the braided wire, the material of the rod 37c can be impedance matched with
the conversion element 13 within a selected range.
[0022]
FIG. 7 further shows that the block 37 e is formed by a reinforced fiber impregnated with an
acoustically attenuating material which is matched to the desired degree between its acoustic
impedance and the acoustic impedance of the conversion element 13. An example is shown. The
fabric of the support extending in the direction from top 31 to bottom 33 is conductive, but the
fabric in all other directions is nonconductive. Thus, the conductive fabric contacts these contacts
over substantially the entire area of the contacts 35 and 41. However, by providing sufficient
space between the contacts and keeping the windings substantially within one pitch, cross talk
between fabrics to adjacent elements can be avoided. The fabrics according to the embodiment of
the present invention shown in FIG. 7 are so thin that there is substantially no acoustic energy
coupled into these fabrics, so that the acoustic impedance of the impregnated material provides
the desired acoustic impedance for the transducer 13 So, it is possible to choose.
[0023]
Another way to obtain a thin conductor and thus reduce the acoustic coupling to the conductor
39 is to utilize a flat conductive foil instead of a round wire such as a conductor. This
embodiment has the further advantage of reducing the electrical inductance due to the
dispersion of the metal. Flat foils can be used in the constructions used for wires, but there is not
much reason to use such foils in braided multi-wire constructions.
[0024]
FIG. 9 shows another way of obtaining the advantages of reduced acoustic coupling and reduced
inductance in a flat conductive foil. In this embodiment, the foil is formed, for example, as a tube
42 wound around a core 44 of the same support material as the rest of the support 37. Thin
layer 42 of conductive material can be formed on core 44 by vacuum evaporation, plating or
other methods known in the art for forming thin metal coatings on insulating substrates. If the
conductor 39 utilized is not thin enough to avoid coupling of acoustic energy, the acoustic output
13-04-2019
11
from the transducing element may be, for example, as in the case where only a single conductor
39 is utilized. Reduce the amount of acoustic energy coupled to the conductor 39 by taking
advantage of the fact that it is maximal at the center and remote from the center of the surface
17 of the transducing element Is possible. Thus, by moving the conductor 39 to the center of the
contact 35 and thus away from the center of the conversion element, in particular to the corner
of the contact / conversion element, as shown for the conductor 39a of FIG. The acoustic energy
that is produced can be greatly reduced. Such a reduction in acoustic coupling may also be
sufficient to eliminate the need to remove acoustic energy from the conductor in the various
ways described above.
[0025]
The acoustic energy coupled to the electrical conductors 39 can be further reduced by exploiting
the fact that the transducing elements 13 in the transducer array 15 are separated from one
another by a material that does not emit acoustic energy. Thus, for example, as shown by contact
35d in FIG. 10, the contacts 35 and 43 are extended in the lower region of such material, and by
placing the extended conductor 39b, the acoustic to the conductor 39 is obtained. It is possible to
further reduce the binding. The description so far has been based on the assumption that the
transducer array 15 and the circuit elements 19 are substantially parallel to one another and the
top and bottom surfaces of the block 27 are also substantially parallel. However, as shown in
FIGS. 11-14, this is not a limitation of the present invention, and indeed may not even be a
desirable form of the present invention. By tilting the top, bottom or both surfaces of the block
27, the circuit area for contact between the lead 39 and the contacts is increased in the
transducer array and / or the circuit element. For high density arrays, this added contact area is
desirable. In FIGS. 11 and 12, only the bottom of the block 27 is shown to be inclined to form an
additional contact area with the circuit board 19. Further, FIG. 13 shows a configuration in which
both the top and bottom surfaces are inclined. FIG. 14 shows another configuration in which the
leads are neither straight nor parallel, but are spaced apart and extend in a curved pattern, with
the circuit board 19 not on the bottom but on the side of the block. It is done. It is also possible
for the block to be shaped with two beveled sides and for the leads 39 to extend at an angle
substantially parallel to the pyramidal wall. Such an arrangement also increases the contact area
of the circuit board while at the same time allowing the use of densely packed two-dimensional
transducer arrays. Furthermore, for the sake of illustration, the various configurations of FIGS. 11
to 14 are illustrated as types shown in FIG. 4, but of course the block shapes of other
embodiments shown in these figures are shown in FIGS. Other embodiments of the present
invention as shown in 8 and 9 can be used.
[0026]
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12
There are several possible ways of producing the support as shown in the figures. For example,
in the case of the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 6, the thin wire can be coated with
an insulating support or it can be coated with an extruded insulating support. The coated or
coated wires are then stacked and bonded to form a support as shown in FIG. 6 using a method
similar to that used in the manufacture of a mosaic face plate of optical fibers. be able to. Once
the support is formed, the surfaces 31 and 33 are metallized and etched to form the desired
contact to the conductor 39.
[0027]
In other embodiments, thin wire layers can be cast into the block material, one layer at a time, or
placed in a mold or mold to fill the block material. Alternatively, it is also possible to feed a
matrix of thin wires into the slip form and to fill the material of the block 37 continuously or
periodically. The material can then be cured and the block 27 can be sliced. As yet another
option, it is also possible to place thin wire rows in a layer of B-stage epoxy filled with a sound
absorbing material. The reverse layers will be stacked until the desired number of conductor
rows is reached, after which the B-stage epoxy will be finally cured. Other methods for forming
the respective supports of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art and
can be used as appropriate.
[0028]
While the above description of the invention has been made in connection with a particularly
preferred embodiment, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the above and other
modifications can be made to the embodiments and details within the spirit and scope of the
invention. It is clear that it is possible to add
[0029]
As described above, in the present invention, the acoustic energy coupled from the conversion
element to the conductor is reduced by forming the conductor sufficiently thin so that the
acoustic energy is hardly coupled. Eliminate the need to remove energy.
Also, by utilizing the fact that the acoustic energy output from the back of each conversion
13-04-2019
13
element is maximum at the center of the back and small at the edge of the element, the
conductor of each conversion element is separated from the center of the back of the element By
positioning on the surface of the electric conductor, the acoustic energy coupled to the conductor
can be reduced.
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