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An orientation course for home room study

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AN ORIENTATION COURSE FOR
HOME ROOM STUDY
A Thesis
Presented to
the Faculty of the School of Education
University of Southern California
In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
Master of Science in Education
by
Lynn ¥• Fitzgerald
August 1940
UMI Number: EP54012
All rights reserved
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a note will indicate the deletion.
UMI EP54012
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)? 6“£i
T '/ u j thesis, w r it t e n u n d e r the d ir e c t io n o f t h e '^ ^ g
C h a ir m a n o f the c a n d id a te ’s G u id a n c e C o m m itte e
a n d a p p ro v e d by a l l m em bers o f the C o m m itte e ,
has been presented to a n d accep ted by the F a c u lt y
o f the S c h o o l o f E d u c a t io n in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n t
o f the re q u ire m e n ts f o r the degree o f M a s t e r o f
Science in E d u c a tio n .
......
Date..**®?:
Dean
Guidance Committee
C . C . C r a w f ord
Chairman
M. M. Thompson
D. Welty Lefever
t a b u ; oe contents
CHAPTER
PAGE
I. THE COURSE OE STUDY,
ITS NEED AND PHILOSOPHY . . 1
The course of study and the home room.......... 2
Over-view of the course of study. . . . . . .
2
l^he selection of the home r o o m ........... 5
The need for orientation . . .................. 7
Youth and his present t r e n d s ........... .
7
The philosophy of the course of study.......12
II.
PROCEDURE...................................... 17
The construction and recordingof the problems 17
The organization of the problems into
chapters . . ............................ 18
The working out of daily lesson plans.......21
Selection of the references to be read by
the pupil and those to be read by the
teacher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
III.
HOW TO GET STARTED . . . . . . .' . .' . .
1. MIDNIGHT OIL.
23
.. .. 2 6
How to s t u d y .............. 27
2. A MAN’S CASTLE.
How to arrange your study
room...................................... 28
3. TIME MARCHES ON.
How to budget your study
time.........................
4. OVERHEAD.
1• • . . . 29
How to take care of study
equipment................’ ............
30
•
•
•
ni
CHAPTER
PAGE
5* ATTENTION,
How to take notes advantageously. 31
6. OH! ' WHERE OH!
WHERE CAN IT BE?
How to keep
assignments..................... . . . . . .
7. UNDER MY SEAL.
32
How to write assignments. . . 33
8. SCHOOL POWERHOUSE.
How to use the library. . 34
9. THE REASURE CHEST. How to use the dictionary. 35
10. THE DEATH HOUSE.
How to pass your tests. . . 36
11. SIMONIZING THE CITRUS.
How to cooperate
with your teachers........................... 37
12.
PARTIALITY.
How to evaluate yourwork. . . . 38
13. HOW’M I DOIN’?
How to get along with your
classmates...................................39
14. NO DOZE.
How to participate in classroom
discussion...................................40
15. THE FILTHY LUCRE. How to save your parents’
money by your school attendance............. 41
IV.
HOW TO PARTICIPATE IN SCHOOL ACTIVITIES
1. PLEASURABLE PURSUITS.
....
42
How to choose an
organization of your interest............... 43
2. THE SPARK PLUG.
How to help make your
organization successful
3.
HEAD MAN.
. . . . . .
44
How to conduct meetings...........45
4. A COG IN THE WHEEL.
How to serve on a com­
mittee........................ . . . . . . .
46
iv
CHAPTER
PAGE
5. THE WRITTEN WORD.
constitution. .
6. GETTING EVEN.
How to write a
........................... 47
How to plan a club initiation. 48
7. ICE CREAM AND CAKE.
How to plan school
parties............................. ..
8. M.C.’S.
How toc.plan student assemblies . . .
9. VOTING MACHINES.
49
50
How to plan school
elections.............................. 51
10.
V.
A BIG SHOT.
How to chose your sport.... 52
HOW TO FOSTER AND MAINTAIN SCHOOL SPIRIT . . . .
58
1.
54
UNITED WE STAND.
2. PUBLIC INVITED,
How to build schoolspirit.
How to sell your school to
your parents and friends. * ............ 55
3. OUTSIDE CAPITAL.
How to cooperate with the
city’s business firms • • • • • • •
4. BROADCAST WHISPERS.
........ 56
How to act in school
assemblies. • • ' • • « ...........
5. BOOHS.
How to act at g a m e s ............... . 58
6. THE GANG’S ALL HERE.
How to use school
organizations.............
7. THE HECKLER’S HECKEL*
plays .
57
59
How to act at school
.......... ........................ 60
8. THE BAND: PLAYED ON.
How to act at music
concerts............................... . 6 1
V
CHAPTER
PAGE
9* SEETHING HUMANITY.
How to set in the halls . 62
10. BRAINS UNINCORPORATED.
How to act in the
classrooms. . . . .................
11. YOU LUCKY PEOPLE.
65
How to act on the campus . 64
12. A STRANGER IN TOWN.
How to act when repre­
senting the school away from h o m e ......... . 6 5
13. VERBAL DAGGERS.
How to treat visiting
students. . . . . . ......................... 66
14. MASSED POWER.
How to organize and conduct
parades • • . • • • • • •
15. MOB SPIRIT.
..........
....
67
How to organize and conduct pep
rallies.............
16. YOUR FRIEND GYM.
68
How to use gymnasium
equipment................................... 69
17. A PERSONAL LOAN.
VI.
How to use school equipment 70
HOW TO DISPLAY PERSONAL ATTRACTIVENESS . . . . .
1. PALAVER PASTIME.
How to converse interesting­
ly.............
2. FELLOW MEN.
3. DICTATORS.
4. CURLY CUES.
5. THE FEEDERS.
71
72
How to consider your classmates. 73
How to consider your elders . . .
74
How to care for your hair. . . .
75
How to care for your hands. . . 7 6
6. THE SHINING LIGHT.
7. CLOTHES HANGER.
How to care for your face 77
How to dress to your ad­
vantage ................................. . . 7 8
CHAPTER
PAGE
8* MIX WELL.
How to make friends............... 79
9. LAUGH, CLOWN, LAUGH.
How to keep your
feelings to yourself........ . ............... 80
How to be taotful . ........... 81
10. NO ONE HURT.
11. THE COUNT OF 10.
How to control your temper. 82
12. SOUND YOUR *Af.
How to'be yourself......... 83
13. THE PEOPLE BELOW.
How to be thoughtful of
others.................
84
14. YOUR1RE WRONG.
How to be a good sport. . . .
15. HIGH GOAL MAN.
How to be self-confident. . . 86
16. THE BUILDER.
85
How to criticize constructively 87
17. PERSONAL PRONOUNS.
How to regard the rights
of oth er s................................... 88
VII.
HOW TO ACQUIRE SOCIAL MANNERS AND COURTESIES . . 89
1. THE GUEST LIST.
How to write and send
invitations................................. 90
2. A RECIPE.
(R. S. V. P.).
How to answer
invitations...........................
3. MAIN EVENT*
How to give a p a r t y . ........... 92
4. DEAR EMILY POST.
How to dress for the
o c c a s i o n ...............
5. JITTERBUGS.
93
How to conduct yourself at a
d a n c e ...........
6. M. I. KV
91
94
How to conduct yourself at the
t a b l e ...........................
95
CHAPTER
PAGE
7. WHATCHAGOT?
How to order from a menu • • . 96
8. HO HUM, SILVER..
How to use table service . 97
9. KNOCKING KNEES.
How to consider the girl
or boy f r i e n d ...................... .
10. THE VIELCOME MAT.
11] .COME. AGAIN.
How to treat your guest . 99
How to be a wanted guest . . .100
12. RUNNING INTERFERENCE.
public.
VIII.
98
How to escort in
......... -
. .101
HOW TO BE SAFE AND MOT S O R R Y ..........
.102
1. FOOLISH PRANKS. How to.prevent accidents
about the school.................... ...
2. LIVE WIRES.
.103
How to prevent accidents at
'home............................ .........104
3. GASOLINE GOOFS.
How to drive
4. CHARRED BODIES.
How to preventforest
fires
acarsafely.105
.................
5. SKULL AND CROSSBONES.
.106
How to prevent
poisoning...................... .
6. A BREATH OF HgO.
How to prevent accidents
by drowning
7. EXIT.
.107
. .108
How to prevent accidents in public
buildings. . . . . . .
8. IT WASN'T LEADED.
.................. .109
H0w to prevent accidents
from the use of fire arms..........
. . .110
CHAPTER
PAGE
9. WHITE LINES.
10. LEVEL HEAD.
How to be a good pedestrian . . Ill
How to act in case of accidents. 112.
IX. HOW TO MAINTAIN AND BUILD H E A L T H ..........
1. HOT DOG.
115
How to prevent athlete’s foot . . . 114
2. HOT AND COLD.
How .to tune up the body with
a bath.......................
115
3. FOUR OUT OF FIVE HAVE IT. How to care for your
t e e t h .........
Il6
4. HEALTHY, WEALTHY, AND WISE.
How to get the
most from your sleep.......................
117
5. EAT, DRINK, AND BE MERRY. How to. care for
your digestive system . .
6. VITAMINS CALL.
................. 118
How to'maintain a balanced
d i e t . ...............
X. HOW TO FIND YOUR PLACE IN THE WORLD.
119
..........120
1. BUSINESS ADDRESS. How to choose a vocation. . 121
2. HELP WANTED.
How to apply for a job. . . .
3. THE INNER DOOR.
4. ON YOUR MARKS*
5. INSIDE DOPE.
6. STEAD WORK.
XI.
. 122
How to use an interview. . . 123
How to get a job............. 124
How to learn about job vacanciesl25
How to hold a job............... 125
THE USE OF THIS COURSE OF STUDY..................126
CHAPTER
I
THE COURSE OF STUDY, ITS NEED AND.PHILOSOPHY
In this orientation course of study the writer has
attempted to set up for the pupil a series of problems which
in their answered forms, will be of practical use in the
student’s daily life.
As Dewey so aptly states:
Anything which can be called a study, whether
arithmetic, history, geography, or one of the natural
sciences, must be derived from materials which at the
outset fall within the scope of ordinary life-experience
It is hoped that through such a course of study a closer
relationship may be formed by the teacher and pupil.
Also
desired is a better understanding of present day standards
and forms as viewed by youth and as interpreted by the adult
The writer has attempted to bring together on common ground
for the pupil and the teacher a situation in which problems
to be answered and decisions to be made by the youth of to­
day may be presented and discussed freely.
It is desired
that the pupil in.going through the course of study find
some enlightahment and something tangible to aid him in his
daily school and social activities.
Richmond
1Iohn Dewey, Experience and Education
The Macmillan Co., 1938), pp. 86-7.
V. Richmond, The Adolescent Boy
Farrar and Rhinehart, 1933J, p. 208.
2
has summed
(New York:
(New York:
2
up the problems as follows:
The choice and decisions which he must make, the
faults.he must overcome, the degree of popularity he
must win with his fellow and with the girls, the depths
of his own nature which he must try to understand— these
are the things of great moment, the business that must
come first*
This orientation course of study is intended, primarily to
be used in the ninth grade home room for orienting those
pupils in early adolescence*
I.
THE COURSE OF-STUDY AND THE HOME ROOM
Where in our modern school system could we more
conveniently place and use this course of study than in the
home room?
Pupils are placed together in classes to receive
their formal instruction in academic work to meet the require­
ments for graduation.
The home room, however, may act as a
clearing house for school announcements and as a consulta­
tion period for the pupil or, as in some instances, another
study period.
The use of this course of study directed by
a competent teacher will bring about profitable and bene­
ficial results.
Over-view of the course of study,cThe"author has
attempted to arrange the sequence of orientation in much the
same order as problems arise with the first year high school
pupil.
The biggest problem the pupil has at the beginning
of his high school career is how to get started properly in
his school work.
From his past school experience he has
3
gained little of the proper study habits, the practical
budgeting of his time for a well-rounded education, and
the wise use of his school facilities, such as the library,
study hall, and the school plant in general*
After he has made his initial start in this new en­
vironment, he becomes concerned about school activities.
How to participate in school activities and social functions
present problems which need to be answered for. his best
freedom of enjoyment.
Inadequacy of such knowledge dampens
the spirit of the pupil for these desirable activities with
his fellow pupils.
While seeking to find his place in his school home,
it is necessary that he has a good opinion of his school
and what it stands for.
Unless he becomes active in help­
ing to build for a better school, he is likely to become
just a non-productive member of the student body.
The only
satisfaction he can derive from his school is that of just
being around, instead of sharing his responsibility with
his classmates in making the school a better one.
How to
foster and maintain school spirit is no small factor for
his proper school adjustment.
At this period of adolescence the personal character­
istics become a conscious factor with the pupil.
more aware of his clothes and his personal habits.
He becomes
Perhaps
some unfortunate experience has been encountered, either
4
embarrassing him or
motivating him to be ;iaeater.
We do not
.want him to withdraw into himself gradually developing a
complex, but, instead, the desirable end is the answering
of his problems of how to display personal attractiveness.
The pupil is desireus of making good impressions upon others.
Through past and present experiences he is becoming conscious
of behavior patterns, not only in the home and the school,
but in the social sphere of which he is on the fringe as
well.
Being at the outer door of social life, problems,
other than his desire for the proper personal qualifications,
arise concerning themselves about social manners and court­
esies.
His air of indifference and supposed sophistication
will not permit him to admit that he is interested in such
things.
This mask of independence is east aside when, pro­
perly conducted in a proper atmosphere, he is given the
opportunity to learn how to acquire social manners and
courtesies.
How to be safe and not sorry presents to the pupil
a practical, usable knowledge.
The many errors, which have
ended with disastrous results to the uninformed, are problems
which need answering for the pupil.
Safety should not con­
cern the pupil alone, but he should be conscious of the
welfare of others.
This chapter takes up safety in the
school, the home, the community, and the state.
5
The next step in orienting the pupil is that of how to
maintain and build health.
Far too frequently does youth
subject his body and his health habits to unnecessary and
harmful practices.
Little does he realize at the time that
his future physical fitness is dependent upon his present
care and maintenance of his health.
If, through his past
and present experiences, pertinent problems can be freely
discussed, the pupil may realize that which he thought was
his own personal problem was, in reality, a problem common
to the rest of his associates.
Finally, as the last to be discussed in the orienta­
tion course, a chapter is arranged on vocations.
The at­
tempt is made to consider the many problems pertaining
to choosing a vocation, and the various steps necessary
to find work in the pupil’s chosen field.
The question,
how to find his place in the world, is one of the most
sought after by the pupils.
It is believed that the eight chapter headings so
chosen and viewed give the pupil a complete orientation
in those problems with which he is continually faced; that
the discussions and solutions are applicable in meeting his
daily demands, both in school and on the outside.
The selection of the home room.
The acceptance and
continuation of the home room in our secondary school systems
have shown that it must be of some worth.
If this were not
6
so their disuse and disappearance would have been felt and
noticed long before now.
Since the home room has been so
widely accepted in our modern school system, the writer
intends for this course to become a part of their programs.
There is no other class in which the time can be taken more
effectively to answer the many guestions of our perplexed
youth.
Their problems frequently need the guidance into
proper channels by some older person.
To quote Dewey:
On the contrary, basing education upon personal
experience may mean more multiplied and more intimate
contacts between the mature and the immature than ever
existed in the traditional school, and consequently more,
rather than less, guidance by others.55
Who is better qualified than the public school teacher whose
close daily contact with the pupil gives an insight and
understanding of the pupil’s world?
In no other school situation do we find a closer
pupil-teacher relationship established than in the home
room. The pupils have an opportunity to learn worth-while
facts which are of practical value in our every day world.
Optimum values may be realized, not only in proper guidance,
but in the development of personalities and social amenities
through the home room. The home room affords the best oppor­
tunity for developing desirable social attributes so valuable
to successful and happy citizenship.
fz
.
.
.
.
John Dewey, Experience and Education
The Macmillan Co., 1938), p. 8.
(New York:
7
II.
THE NEED FOR ORIENTATION
It is not enough that public school teachers today
merely teach their chosen subjects, but our teachers should
be ever, willing to be of beneficial assistance to the pupils
in their charge*
To be of beneficial assistance, the teacher
must help the pupil solve his social problems of everyday
life*
Those instances which to the adult seem trivial and
unimportant?*! assume magnanimous importance to the adolescent
pupil.
Far too frequently are the pupil’s social questions
cast aside in favor of more pedagogical ones.
Youth and his present trends*
Today, more than ever
before, should our schools point the way and guide its pupils
in helping them meet intelligently life’s demands.
As Dewey
points out:
If schools are to recognize the needs of all classes
of pupils, and give pupils a training that will insure
their becoming successful and valuable citizens, they
must give work that will not only make the pupils strong
physically and morally and give them the right attitude
toward the state and their neighbors, but that will as
well give them enough control over their material environ­
ment to enable them to be economically independent.
To understand better what we are to do, we must have an in­
sight to the nature of the pupil we are working with.
We
must realize that upon entrance to our secondary schools
^Jbhn Dewey, Democracy and Education
E. P. Dutton and Co., 1915), p. 308.
(New York:
8
these pupils are undergoing a gradual change from puberty
to adulthood,
during this change of growth, which we have
termed the adolescent age, the pupil .is continually trying
to keep an even balance against the many problems confront­
ing him.
His reactions to these problems of adjustment and
decisions should be as smooth as possible.
It is the in­
tent of this orientation course of study to help the bewild­
ered pupil smooth out as many of these confronting problems
as possible.
The pupil’s need is ever present, but the em­
phasis to the pupil is upon these early years of adolescence.
Oftentimes the inability of the pupil to cope with the
problems confronting him has resulted in his seeking help
and advice, not from someone capable of giving sound guid­
ance, but rather from someone who is totally unqualified.
As Richmond states;
There are so many things that he (the student) wants
to know and the sources of reliable information are so
few; his elders are so frequently embarrassed in the
discussion of these questions that he prefers not to
ask them;.books are usually very unsatisfactory; lectures
are often even more so, while his contemporaries, for
their show of knowledge, are as bewildered as himself.5
Through the lack of considerations for the pupil and his
problems, teachers and parents have ignored what they have
thought inconsequential for his proper development.
Our
well meaning but unhelpful emphasis has been placed in too
5
Richmond, o£. cit., p. 208.
9
great a proportion on the gaining of
facts from books, which,
even when these facts are learned, are of little help to the
pupil in his daily life*
Granted that a meager beginning has been made in the
secondary schools of our nation in helping the pupil orient
himself, the fact is still very apparent that there remains
the greatest amount of work to be done*
The enrollment in
four year high schools, given in the latest governmental
survey6, in 1934, indicate that there were approximately
6,557,940 pupils* The task of educating these pupils was
7
done by 227,7B7 men and women teachers. Of this total of
teachers only 1,385 were employed as specialist in counsel­
ing and guidance*
This small group responsible for guidance
and counseling represented approximately .6 per cent of the
total number of teachers.
In pupil-counselor ratio, there
were approximately 2,027 pupils for each counselor.
This, of course, is worked out on a hypothetical
even distribution of pupils throughout the United States.
It is appalling enough in itself, but when we consider that
o
only the larger schools, of which only 6.2 per cent0 of our
^Biennial Survey of Education in the United States.
1933-34. Bulletin, 1935, 0 1
Vol. V, Table 7, p. 24.
(United States Department of the Interior, Office of Education).
7Ibicl., Vol. V., p. 16.
8Ibid.. Vol.V.,
p. 12.
10
total schools have in excess of one thousand pupils, employ
special counselors.
It is quite evident that a very small
percentage receive any benefits of special counseling and
guidance.
Of the totals number of our secondary schools,
9
the largest number, 70.5 per cent , have enrollments of
less than two hundred.
This supports the contention that
whatever guidance and counseling is to be done, it must
come from the classroom teacher.
Further need for an orientation course is shown by
the number of high school graduates who go on to institu­
tions of higher learning and those who find their place in
our work-a-day world.
Only 25.1 per eent1^ of the graduating
classes of 1934 went on with their education.
The remain­
ing group, 74.9 per cent, sought*their places in whatever
work they could secure.
In view of these facts and figures, the need can be
readily seen for a course of study which will help the pupil
in his much needed orientation.
The aforementioned group
of non-college entrants are persistantly confronted with
further adjustments and decisions to be made.
The school
can provide the proper requirements in helping the pupil
gain a broad foundation for his daily needs outside of
school.
9Ibid.. Vol. V., p. 6.
lOlbid., Vol. V., p. 12.
11
In the past the main concernment felt for the pupil
was that of preparing for the future.
Our well meaning
far-sightedness has completely overlooked the needs of the
present.
As Richmond states:
Wei,; his parents and teaehers, seem to him so often
occupied with his future, we are continually appealing
to the man he will some day he; but for him it is the
present that is of importance. And he is not far wrong,
for out of the way he handles his problems now, will
come the experiences and habits which will enable him
to handle his problems in the future.11
The writer has attempted to choose problems which
need the consideration of the average pupil.
If, in any
way whatsoever, some good can be derived from the study
of such a course, it is felt that the original purpose has
beeqfeccomplished.
However, just realizing the pupil’s need
and presenting what is considered a partial remedy is not
enough.
The administering teacher must have not only know­
ledge of the youth’s mental attitudes, but must, as well,
have factual knowledge of his activities.
Through a com­
plete understanding on the part of the teacher will it be
possible to do the most effective work with the 'pupil.
The
teacher must try to be more than just someone who teaches
a subject the pupil enrolls for, but she must attempt to
gain his confidence and from such provide beneficial aid
and guidance.
To quote Richmond:
n -------
W. V. Richmond, The Adolescent Boy
The Macmillan Co., 1938), p. 208.
12Ibid., p. 175.
(New York:
12
How little we often know, after all, of his own
mental attitudes, and even of his activities; many
of them, to he sure, he does not wish us to know, he
has an instinctive feeling that we will not understand,
and it is quite true that a disinterested person is
often in a position to give him more help than those
more closely connected with him; and so he takes counsel
of his contemporaries or struggles with his problems
alone; believing that they are peculiar to himself.
Thus he finds the developmental period beset with
difficulties which might be easily cleared away if
he knew where to turn for aid and understanding.12
III.
THE PHILOSOPHY BE THE COURSE OF STUDY
With a course of study such as presented herein*
unless, the administering teacher is imbued with the proper
philosophy, the main point, as intended by this author, will
be lost.
Before any agreement can be reached by two or more
parties, they first must have a common understanding of the
problems confronting them.
Only when such an understanding
has been reached can any definite objective or goal be
reached.
If, at any time during the process from the be­
ginning to the final outcome, the ultimate objective is lost
sight of, it is better to stop then and there rather than
continuing blindly.
As is seen from the problems worked out for daily use
in the course of study, the writer has attempted to make
everything as functional as possible for the learner.
If
through our class discussion we can arouse and stimulate the
pupil in his decisions to be made, we have started him
13
functionally in our orientation*
Following that, it is
hoped from the formed decisions that the pupil will become
more aware of how to do a particular thing rather than how
not to do.
It is much more desirable in this orientation
course of study to build the positive approach instead of
the negative.
A pupil may learn how not to do or how not
to act in a given situation and be a complete failure when
asked how to do or how to act in the same situation.
Motivation is a great asset in a strictly academic
teacher-pupil study.
However, in bringing lifelike problems
into the classrooms for the pupil, it serves not only as a
factor of motivation, but whets the intent of the pupil in
his desire to learn.
The desire or intent on the part of
the learner assures learning; the only need is that of pro­
per guidance by the teacher.
Kilpatrick states:
If we wish our pupils to acquire good traits, we
can only expect to succeed with them as they themselves
wish to succeed. Thus again we must have actual life
going on, not only to supply....... the occasions for
exercise of desired traits, but also to supply .......
the conditions which make the proper success desired.
Observation easily convinces that the social attitude
of fellow pupils is ordinarily far more potent to induce
a desirable attitude in a delinquent than anything the
master alone can do. In fact only as the teacher can
mobilize a favorable social attitude in the other pupils
may he hope generally for success. The best learning
conditions are present when teacher and pupils are joint
cooperators in shared enterprise and each item and
effort is judged by the way it works in the joint life
rather than upon any word of external authority. The
wise teacher will under such conditions seize every op­
portunity whereby the pupils may increase their wholesome
14
practice of valuable traits.
13
The teacher must be keenly aware of the learning
process of the pupil.
Regardless of how well prepared the
teacher might be, unless a complete understanding is estab­
lished on common ground with the pupil that preparation
is futile if the desirable ends are to be met.
The course of study must be alive and vital, not to
either the pupil or the teacher separately, but to each
together.
While the pupil may profit from the activity of
his study, he is likely to have better success if that
activity is shared with the teacher.
*
A teacher to completely understand the problems of
the pupils can not be content to learn of these problems in
a second hand way.
hand manner.
This knowledge must be gained in a first
By associating with the pupils in as many of
these situations from which problems arise as possible, the
teacher can, not only see the cause, but can view the re­
action of the pupil as well.
Herein lies the most success­
ful effectiveness of the teacher’s understanding and guidance
of the pupil *s problems.
It is not enough just to stimulate the attitudes and
ideals of the pupil.
13
The pupil, after being so stimulated,
'
William Heard Kilpatrick, Education for a Changing
Civilization (New York: The Macmillan Co., 1926T, p. ICO.
/
15
is desirous of seeing practical outcomes.
There practical
outcomes must be accomplished in a functional manner.
Too
many times in past school experience has the pupil been
unable to see the practical application and outcomes of the
subject being taught.
As Dewey says:
>
Children should not leave school at fourteen, but
should stay in school until they are sixteen or eighteen,
and be helped to an intelligent use of their energies
and to the proper choice of work. It is commonplace
among teachers and workers who come in contact with any
number of pupils who leave school at fourteen to go to
work, that the reason is not so much financial pressure
as it is lack of the conviction that school is doing
tham any good*14
Dewey continues his remarks about the reasons that high
school pupils drop and quit school by starting:
But the commonest reason advanced by the pupils for
leaving school is that they did not like it, and were
anxious to get some real work to do. Not that they
were prepared to go to work, or had finished any course
or training, but simply that school seemed so futile
and satisfied so few of their interests that they seized
the first opportunity to make a change to something that
seemed more real, something where there was a visible
result,15
Too many times has the pupil in the classroom been in
competition with his classmates for grades rather than seek­
ing informational knowledge.
Far too frequently is the
knowledge promptly forgotten in his quest for high marks set
up as desirable standards to be attained!
14John Dewey, Schools of Tomorrow
Dutton and Col, 1915), p. 310.
15Ibia.. p. 311.
Heretofore the
(New York:
F. P.
16
pupil has studied, not for the benefits of the knowledge
gained, but to try and best his associates* grades; and
also has he studied because it was felt that in so doing
he met the standards set up by the school.
His mistakes
have been corrected and pointed out; he has echoed back
the material from the printed page in the approved manner.
All of this has tended to make him passive and tolerated
because it is what we have thought the best to offer.
As no grades or artificial standards are given out
or set up in the home room class * it is hoped that here
learning may take place for its practical value rather
than getting a higher mark than his neighbor.
From the
course of study it is hoped and intended that the pupil
be able to see clearly, not only the value of its function
to him, but the availability of its practical application
to his daily needs.
It is the intention of this writer that this course
of study, as developed, will aid and benefit the pupil in
his solutions of problems encountered not only in the begin­
ning of his high school career, but also give him the proper
foundation of social manners and courtesies.
If this course
of study can help answer the many school and social problems
it will then serve as intended.
CHAPTER
II
PROCEDURE
In gathering and compiling the various problems, the
following steps were undertaken (1) the writing down of
problems on separate slips of paper; (2) the organization
of problems into chapters; (3) the writing out of daily
lesson plans; and (4) finally the inclusion of the refer­
ences to be read by the pupil and those to be read by the
teacher.
The construction and recording of the problems. The
pupils unknowingly forced the attention of this writer to
their daily problems.
In doing so, they showed their appar­
ent inadequacy to cope with their problems intelligently.
Not only was this inadequacy shown in their class work and
its many factors, but even more so in their participation
in other activities of a social nature.
Consequently,
when this orientation course of study was begun, the writer
had a definite idea of what he thought should be included.
After securing several pads of white slips, size two
and one-half by three and one-half inches, the procedure
was to write down as many of the problems as could be thought
of.
During this procedure not only were problems recorded
which had evolved from past experiences, but articles, books,
18
and magazines were read if their content was, in any way,
connected to youth and his adjustments.
The main proportion
of the problems arose from past experiences of the writer,
and the remaining from his readings.
All of these problems
were written on these white slips of paper.
After the
recording of as many of these problems as could be thogght
*
of,
the writer proceeded to arrange them.
The total number
of problems first arranged was one hundred sixty-five.
As
is evidenced by the course of study, each problem was preceeded by a how to.
By this means the author was able to
keep the problems specific in their nature and insure the
pupil of a definite understandable solution to meet his
daily needs.
The organization of the problems into chapters.
Upon
the completion of writing the problem down, the slips were
carefully cheeked to eliminate any repetition.
The first
time this check was made about thirty of the problems were
weeded out as they were too much like some of the others.
The slips were next sorted into four groups.
In group one
those problems which pertained to the pupil's academic wel­
fare were included.
Group two included all.of those problems
in which the pupil's extra-curricular activities, both in
school and out of school, demanded answering in a practical
manner for use in a practical way.
In group three were placed those slips whose problems
19
considered the pupil’s personality and any health problems
which pertained to either him individually or his school,
home or community.
Groups four included those problems
that when answered completely, would prove to be an aid
and help to those pupils who find it necessary to leave
school at the end of their first year.
j&fter these four general groupings had been estab­
lished, the next step was to cheek carefully through each
group.
The first time through in checking the problems
in each group the writer eliminated, those problems which
were too remote from the general topic.
The second time
through the problems were divided into specific groups.
The desire here was to band together those problems most
closely associated with each other and whose application
applied to the common interest of the pupil.
The third
time these problems were checked the author went through
those which had been placed to one side the first time
through.
Xf, in this final "check, these problems could not
he;fitted into any of the chosen topics and could not be
changed without duplication, they were disposed of as un­
usable.
The result of this checking and cataloguing of the
problems brought about the organization of them into def­
inite chapter headings.
These chapters, of which there
were eight, are broad enough in their scope of problems in­
cluded to answer the many questions of the first year high
20
school pupil*
The final chapter headings as decided upon *
are (1) How to get started; (2) How to participate in school
activities; (3) How to foster and maintain
school spirit;
(4) How to display persohal attractiveness; (5) How to ac­
quire social manners and courtesies; (6) How to be safe and
not sorry; (7) How to maintain and build health; and (8)
How to find your place in the world.
The chapters are not of equal length.
In grouping
the problems the main consideration was to have them as
closely related to one another as possible.
It was not
the intent of this writer to have as many under one head­
ing as the other-just for the sake of equalness.
Some few
of these chapters hold far more for the individual pupil
than others, and from past experience the writer feels that
he has grouped them to best meet the common needs of all.
Also no attempt has been made to arrangecthe chapters
in ■what might be their order of importance.
Instead the
attempt has been made to arrange the chapters in the most
logical sequence from the pupil*s point of view.
It is be­
lieved that the main consideration of the pupil just enter­
ing high school is how shall he fit himself into his new
environment as easily as possible.
The pupil is anxious
to know how to go about his class work and just how much
should he assert himself around the school and in the class­
room.
Soon after his adjustment in this beginning he becomes
21
concerned with the many school activities.
Since he cannot
belong to all, he must decide upon the one which will meet
his needs and desires the most.
While engaged in his school
activities the pupil becomes more interested in the schools
background and tradition.
He, perhaps, serves his school
in some minor capacity and from these learns of school
spirit and what it means.
Through his association with
the older pupils, he cannot but help notice their dress and
other personal attractions; and in becoming conscious of
his own personal self, he sees the need of good manners and
the necessity of doing the right thing at the
right time.
Matters of group and personal safety are next, introduced,
followed by a study in personal hygiene both being intro­
duced when the pupil is at the age when he is really con­
cerned with such things.
And finally, just before the sem­
ester closes problems are answered which might help in help­
ing him secure either a part time job or permanent employment.
The proceeding paragraph has been given to show the
writer’s sequence of thought for the arrangements of the
chapters.
The problems within the eight chapters have been
arranged in very much the same thought sequence.
The working out of daily lesson plans.
The proced­
ure in making out the daily lesson plans necessitated four
main steps for each one.
These four steps are as follows:
(1) activities to do; (2) decisions to decide; (3) books
to read by the pupil; and (4) books to read by the teacher*
The writer has attempted to keep each daily lesson
plan in the same form as the preceding one.
In these daily
lesson plans, the pupil is first confronted with the activ­
ities to do.
For the
most part, the activities are con­
fined to the class room and with that in mind the writer
has included class discussions, outside speakers on special
subjects, a listing of the more important items to be re­
tained, demonstrations, and individual talks by members of
the class.
However, there are several problems in which
it was necessary to have the pupil do certain activities
outside of class..
Such activities would be visiting bus­
iness firms who specialize in certain appliances or commod­
ities, interviewing of individuals in specialized fields,
the studying of some community project, observing things
which are pertinent to the problem, and soliciting of ma­
terials which will help in class work.
From these activities certain decisions will have
to be made by the pupil.
He cannot make these decisions
to best fit his needs if he has not fully worked out the
activities.
From the activity the pupil is able to see the
direct application of the activity to his daily life, and
in turn be mentally prepared from the decisions he has reach­
ed to actively solve these problems when they arise in his
23
experiences.
The decisions to be made by the student are all
built around the foundational stone— evaluation.
One of
the main purposes of these decisions is to have the pupil
evaluate the issue, when possible, in three different lights.
If the pupil can apply one of the three, how to, when to,
and where to, to any of his decisions, he is more likely
to reach the desired specific point rather than ending with
some broad generality.
This writer has attempted, in the
issues and their decisions to be reached, to include each
one of the three.
This was done in hopes that through some
variety in reaching the decision the pupil would not form the
same approach for each decision.
As no two experiences are
identical in each detail and no two individuals react in the
same manner in a like experience, it is all the more reason
that we teach our pupils to think through their own decisions
they are making in their own way and not to rely upon some
fixed plan or cure all for,every situation.
The writer also
has tried to coordinate the activities and their outcomes to
the decisions and their outcomes.
It is desired that the
activity* as experienced by the pupil, materially help in
forming his decisions.
Selection of the references to be read by the pupil
and those to be read by the teacher.
For a course of this
24
nature to be the most successful, it is very necessary for
good reference material to be available not only for the
students but for those who teach it as well.
The writer of
this course of study has utilized only those references
which are avilable in the school’s library and those in the
city’s library.
Only those books whidh apply directly to
the problems under consideration were chosen and the writer
attempted to use as recent books as possible.
The card catalogues in the school library and in the
city library were checked through and all books which gave
any indication of being helpful to either the pupil or the
teacher were written down.
Time was then taken to go
through each book carefully and if certain chapters were use­
ful or the entire book satisfactory it was marked down as a
book to be used.
After a satisfactory list had been com­
piled the writer checked with the libraries to find out how
many copies of each book were available,
m
some particular
instances when an exceptionally useful book was found, the
writer sent in a requisition to the superintendent’s office
asking for more copies of the book.
The writer also arranged
with the two librarians to send to him any advanced litera­
ture of new books which might be useful in the course.
three instances the writer found magazine articles which
were worthwhile reading by the pupils for added material
In
25
in the references*
The writer had these mimeographed and
placed them in the hands of the pupils.
The writer has attempted to show in this chapter
the procedure which was used in preparing this orientation
course of study for ninth grade pupils.
Everyday problems
confronting the pupil were written down on small slips of
paper.
These problems were later organized into eight
chapters and the chapters were arranged in the best thought
of manner.
After the problems had been arranged and their
sequence in the chapter decided upon, daily lesson plans
for each problem was worked out.
These plans included
activities for the pupil to do, decisions for them to make,
and books to be read as.references and further help.
included were references books for the teacher.
Also
CHAPTER
III
HOW TO GET STARTED
The pupils who enter any typical high school for the
first time come from a wide variety of grade schools, and
consequently have just as varied experiences.
It is the
purpose of this first chapter to attempt to coordinate
these varied experiences.in an effort to give all of these
■beginning pupils an equal opportunity in getting the right
start.
While this unification will be carried throughout
the entire course, it will not be mentioned again as the
course itself cannot but help gather or unify the thought
of those taking it.
It is thought that the greatest bene­
ficial aid is that of helping the pupils gain an insight of
what is expected of them in their new work and the answer­
ing of their most fundamental problems.
This first chapter deals primarily in helping the
pupil gain the correct approach in his academic work.
Other
considerations include the use of the school’s library
facilities and the student’s participation in the classroom.
27
1. MIDNIGHT OIL.
How to study
To do;
1. Divide into committees of five, Each committee is to
make a list of the 10 most important procedures of good
study. The committee chairman must be able to defend
this list in a class panel discussion.
2. The committee chairman will present to the class the
list his committee has chosen and defend it against any
arguments from the class, Blace a class list of the
best twenty on the black board.
3. Copy the list from the black board and paste it in the
front of your notebook as a continual reminder of how
to do your assignments in the best manner.
To decide;
1. How can you best arrange your study habits to get the
most from your lesson and attain the most success?
2. How can you get the most, financially and scholastically,
from your textbooks?
3. Is it better to buy your own books or share in the buying
of them with soneone else?
4. Canyou keep up in your class work by taking a chance of
using the textbooks in the library or borrowing fromsome
one else?
5. How
can
you best studywith one or
6. How
can
you best studyalode?
more classmates?
To read;
1. Charles Bird:
Effective Study Habits (Century, 1931)♦
2. Ruth MeKoane:
The Way to Learn
3. Carol Hovious:
(Allyn and Bacon, 1931)
Following Printed Trails
(D. C. Heath, 1936),
88
2. A MAN’S CASTLE•
How to arrange your study room
To do;
1. Compare pictures of good and poor study rooms.
2. Make a list of the characteristics of a good study room
and a poop study room.
3. Make a list of reasons to be used as arguments with your
parents as to why you need a study room.
4. Have a talk by a lighting engineer on modern home light­
ing.
5. Demonstrate a light meter.
6. Make a«.list of the improvements you can make on your
study room at home.
7. Give your arguments as to why there should be quiet
during your study hours.
8. Visit an electrical shop and compare types of study lamps.
9. Arrange your study room to your best advantage.
To decide:
1. How to get a study room at home?
2. How can you get the family to cooperate in keeping your
room quiet during,study hours?
3. What shall be the best arrangement of your study room?
4. How will you arrange your room in relation to lighting
facilities?
5. How can you improvise desirable artificial light?
6. How can you keep your working materials in order?
To read:
1. Charles Bird:
Effective Study Habits
2• Ruth MeKoane:
The Yfay To Learn
3. Carol Hovious:
(Century, 1931)
(Allyn and Bacon, 1931)
Following Printed Trails
(D.C.Heath, 1936)
29
3# T3ME MARCHES ON.
How to budget your study time
To do;
1. Make a graphy showing how much time you give to household’
chores, recreation, and school assignments. Compare
yours with others in a class discussion.
2. Tell the class how many ways you have seen students
waste time in the classroom and study hall*
3. Demonstrate how your books and working materials can
be arranged to save time*
4. Make a list of the things you can do to save yourself
time and do better studying*
5. Write on the black board study faults most common to the
members in class and discuss how each can be overcome.
To decide:
1. How much time should be put in on an assignment?
2. Which, assignments should be studied first and why?
3. How much outside work can you do and still keep up in
your assignments?
4* How late at night should you study?
5. Which is better: to break your study into several periods
or to do it all at once?
6* How can you be most economical with your study time?
To read:
1. Charles Bird:
Effective Study Habits
2. Ruth McKoane:
The Way to Learn
(Century, 1931)
(Allyn and Bacon, 1931)
3. Carol Hovious: Following Printed Trails
(D. C. Heath, 1936)
4* OVERHEAD*
How to take care of study equipment
To do:
1. Divide the class into four groups* Group I ,to make a
list of the advantages of taking care of study equip­
ment, and Group II to make a list of therresulting
effects, when study equipments is not taken care of.
Group III to make a list of how to keep lockers clean,
neat, safe, and sanitary* Group IV prepares a list of
must do*s to he ready for written work at all times.
£♦ Upon the completion of the list each group selects a
member to present that group’s list for discussion*
Choose the best 3 or 4 items of each list, except II,
and put them on the blackboard to be copied and pasted
in notebooks.
3. Make a list of the advantages of taking care of your study
equipment.
To decide:
1* How can you find books and equipment when you need them?
£. How will you arrange your books and equipment in your
locker so as to find what you want easily when you want it?
3. What are the advantages of keeping your books in good
bondition?
4. How can you be prepared for written work in class, study
hall, and home?
5. In what way can you cover your books best to insure good
protection?
6. Have can you save time and money by being careful?
To read:
1. Charles Bird:
£. T* H. Pear;
Effective Study Habits
The Art of Study
(Century;, 1931)
(B* P. Dutton, 1930)
31
5* ATTENTION*
How to take notes advantageously
To do:
1* Discuss the advantages of keeping a note book, and how
you can profit in your school work by it*
2. Demonstrate a good way to arrange your notebook into
sections*
3* Demonstrate a good way to take notes in outline form*
4. Make a list of the factors whieh aid in keeping a note­
book neat and readable. Check your notebook against
this list and make the necessary corrections*
5* Compare notebooks and make a list of the various advan­
tages of each type.
To decide:
1. How can you arrange your notebook so as to have a section
for each class?
2. How canyou arrange your class notes to show at a glance
what is most important and what is secondary in importance?
3. Which is better: to try and take down as much as possible
of what is said, or to outline briefly?.
4. How canyou improve your work by taking and using your
class notes?
5. How can you keep- your notebook in order and be.able to
find anything in it which might be needed?
6. What kind of notebook is best for your needs?
To read:
1. Charles Bird:
Effective Study Habits
2* Ruth McKoane:
The Way to Learn
3. Carol Hovious:
(Century, 1931)
(Allyn and Bacon, 1931)
Following Printed Trails
(D. C. Heath, 1936)
32
6. OHl
WHERE OEt
WHERE CAN IT BE?
How to keep assignments
To do i
1* Tell the class, either a personal experience or one ob­
served, of a disastrous result of failing to find a
poorly recorded assignment.
2. Make a list of the ways you believe best to keep assign­
ments. Present them to the class and discuss the merits
of each. If any are presented which you believe better
than yours write it down. Edit your list and choose the
ones best fitted for your needs.
3. Have an open class discussion on the questions How can
I profit by keeping a neat, concise record of assignments?
To decide:
1. How should your assignments be written down?
2. Where should your assignments be writter down?
3. How can you keep a permanent record of your assignments
for each class?
4. What are the chief advantages of keeping assignments?
5. How can a permanent record of assignments help for
better grades?
To read:
1. Charles Bird:
Effective Study Habits
2. Ruth McKoane:
The Way to Learn
(Century, 1931)
(Allyn and Bacon, 193J.)
33
7. UNDER MY SEAL.
How to write assignments
To do:
1. Block out a^aper showing the name, title, margin, and
paragrap'h indention and list your reasons for the place­
ment of each*
2. Pick out the three best arranged papers and put them on
the blackboard. As a class choose the best points of
each and make a copy of it in your notebooks. Keep
this as a guide for your future work.
3. List the main reasons for doing neat work and how you
think they will affect you.
4. List the advantages to be gained in doing a written
assignment.
5. Discuss:
The written report vs. the oral report.
To decide:
1. ‘
What kind of paper should assignments be written on and
why?
2. What are the advantages of writing all class work as
neatly as possible?
3. What are the main things which make a paper appear neat?
4. Why should you use good grammar and correct punctuation
in your written work and not for English classes alone?
5. Which papers should you do in ink and which for pencil?
6. What are the main reasons for correcting your mistakes
or returned papers and filing them for future reference?
To read:
1. Charles Bird:
Effective Study Habits
(Century, 1931)
2. William E. Book: Learning How to Study and Work
Effectively (Ginn and Co., 1926)
34
8. SCHOOL POWERHOUSE♦ How to use the library
To do:
1. Invite the school librarian or one of her assistants to
explain the arrangement of the school library; how the
card catalogue is arranged; and why books are so numbered,
2, Make a list oh the blackboard of the Dewey classification
of books,
4, Relate to class difficulties you have encountered in
using the library.
5,
Visit the city library and familiarize .yourself with its
arrangement.
To decide:
1. How can you save time and energy by being familiar with
the arrangement of your library?
2. How can you profit by knowing the Dewey classification
of books?
3. How can you aid your fellow students when you are in the
library?
4. What can you do to aid the librarian?
5. How can the library help you?
6. How can you show your appreciation for the use of the
school and city libraries?
To read:
1. C. C. Crawford:
1928)
2. Charles Bird:
3. R. L. Sandwich:
Co., 1929)
Technique of -Study
Effective ^tudy Habits
Study and Personality
(Houghton Mifflin Co.,
(Century, 1931)
(D, C. Heath" and
35
9. THE TREASURE CHEST.
How to use the dictionary
To do:
1. As many as possible bring dictionaries to class. Make
a list on the blackboard of the sections in.the dictionary
not defining words#
2. Discuss the list on the board and how you can profit from
it.
3. Divide the class in ahalf and have a contest looking words
up dictated by the chairman#
4# Discuss synonyms and antonyms.
To decide:
1# How
canyou
make better grades by using the dictionary?
2. How
canyou
profit by knowing how a dictionary is composed?
3. How
canyou
determine the eorrec t manner of pronuunciation?
4# How
canyou
find spelling aids in the dictionary?
5. How
up?
canyou
increase your vocabulary when looking words
6# How/: should you judge a good dictionary if you were
buying one?
7# What information other than definition and pronounciation
is given about each word?/'
To read:
1. C. C. Crawford:
Co., 1928)
Technique of Study
2# Richard L# Sandwich:
and Co., 1929)
(Houghton Mifflin
Study and Personality
---------- --------
(D. C. Heath
36
10* THE DE4TH HOUSE*
How to pass your test
To do;
1* In a class discussion discuss how you can profit from
a test*
2. Make a list of procedures of how you would study for a
test*
3* Compare your list with the rest of the class.
Choose
the procedures you believe to best fit your needs.
4. Discuss study review.
To decide:
1. How can you check up on yourself while reviewing for a
test?
2. What are the advantages of proper review?
3. What are the advantages of not failing to hand in all
assignments?
4. How can you best use your time during a test?
5. How can you help yourself in time and energy by saving
your returned assignments?
6. What kind of an attitude should you have during a test?
To reads
1. C. C. Crawford:
1928)
2. Charles Bird:
Technique of Study
Effective Study Habits
(Houghton Mifflin Co.,
(Century, 1931)
37
11.
SIMONIZING THE CITRUS.
teachers
How to cooperate with your
To do:
1. Prepare and hand in a short paper on:
means to me or Cooperation, Its place
What cooperation
in the school.
2. Discuss in elass the value of cooperation and how it
affects daily living and learning in the classroom.
3. Make a list onthe hoard of the essential qualities of
cooperation in the classroom.
4. Check up on yourself to see if you exhibit the essentials
of cooperation from the list on the board.
To decide:
1. How can you aid your companions by cooperating?
2. Does cooperation bring about a better understanding
among pupils and teachers?
3. How can you help your teachers by cooperating?
4. How can you aid yourself by cooperating?
5. How can you gain added respect of your classmates by
cooperating?
6. What can you do to better cooperate §t all times?
To read:
1. Harry C. McKown:
Hr>me Room Guidance
2. Richard L. Sandwich:
and Co., 1929)
(McGraw-Hill, 1934)
Study and Personality
(D. G. Heath
12.
PARTIALITY•
How to evaluate your work
To do:
1* Make a list on the hoard of the steps necessary in
evaluating work before it is handed in.
2. Discuss the importance of following such a list before
work is handed in.
3. Copy the list from the board in your notebook and add
any points you believe will help you.
4. Evaluate arecently returned assignment and see if you
could have avoided some mistakes had you evaluated your
paper before handing it in.
To decide?
1. How
canyou
raise your grades by evaluating your own
work before handing it in?
2. How
canyou
3. How
canyou
work?
form better habitsthrough self-evaluation?
improve your studyhabits by evaluating your
4. Other than better grades what are the advantages of being
able to evaluate work?
5. How can you carry this habit of evaluation over to other
things advantageously?
6. Does evaluation always make for better work?
To read:
1. Richard Bird:
2. C. C .. Crawford:
1928)
Effective Study Habits
Technique of Study
(Century, 1931)
(Houghton Mifflin,
39
13. HOW*M I DOINf?
How to get along with your classmates
To do:
1. Make a list of the qualities you like to see in others.
2. Make a list of qualities you do not like to see in others.
3. In class discussion using your list compile on the board
the outstanding factors of likes and dislikes*
4. Discuss how these items affect our getting along with
others.
5. Copy the list from the board in your notebook as a
reminder of that which is good and bad.
To decide:
1. How can you further develop those good qualities which
you possess?
2. How can you eliminate those which are not good?
3. H0w can one bad quality over shadow the many good ones
you have?
4. How can you get along with your classmates and still not
agree with them on everything?
5. Why should you make the effort to be agreeable with your
classmates?
6. How can you assure >;your classmates of your sincerity
in getting along with them?
To read.:
l.Iill Edwards:
1935)
Personality Pointers
2. Richard L. Sandwich:
and Co., 1929)
(Bobbs-Merrill Co.,
Study and Personality
(D. C. Heath
4G
14.
NO DOZE.
How to participate in classroom discussion
To do:
1. Discuss in class the necessity of controlled discussion
and the best ways to attain it.
2. List elements of character and good manners which are
brought out in discussion.
3. Discuss.Lnumber 2 and arrange items from most important to
least important.
4. Observe classmates in your classes and their manner of
participating in discussion.
To decide?
1. How do good manners present themselves in classroom
discussion?
2. What' can you do to keep the discussion interesting and
mov ing?
3. How can you help others intelligently discuss problems?
4. In what ways can a discussion be helpful or harmful?
5. How can you show good manners and courtesy in a class­
room discussion?
6. How can you gain from classroom discussion?
To read:
1. Richard L. Sandwich:
and Co., 1929)
£>tudy and Personality
2. Milton Wright:
Managing Yourself
3. Milton Wright:
The Art of Conversation
(D.G.Heath
(McGraw-Hill, 1938)
(McGraw-Hill, 1936J
41
15* THE FILTHY LUCRE. How to'save your parents1 money by
your school attendance
To do:
1. Invite your school principal or a. member of the school
board to explain how schools are financed.
2. Take notes during his explanation of the most important
points to you.
3. Have ah open discussion or question-answer at the end
of his talk.
4. Make a list on the board of the things you can do to make
the school money go farther.
To decide *
1. How can you save your parents' money by regular
attendance?
2. How can you economize in your use of school facilities?
3. In what ways can you help your classmates save?
4. How can you familial*ize your parents with what is being
done with their tax money?
5# What can you do to show the community you realize what
is being done for you?
6. How can you best return the investment of money your
parents and friends must pay each year?
To reads
1. Your Children and Their Schools
Education, 19371
(Los Angeles Board of
CHAPTER
IV
HOW TO PARTICIPATE IN SCHOOL ACTIVITIES
The only means the school has of broadening the
pupil’s outlook is through the extra-currieular program..
A program of straight academic work does not present to
the pupil a life-like situation.
That is, if we compare
class work to a man’s working day and the extra-curricular
activities to his recreational activities.
To be able to
fit into any group in our organized social world, the pupil
must first know how to get along with his fellow men.
He
must learn to work for the common interest of the group
a M accept his responsibility.
In the pupil’s present
environment, the school is the main socializing agency.
Thus, it falls to the school to provide, not only academic
situations, but also to provide the more informal social­
ized extra-curricular activities which will prepare him to
be a more effective member of society.
43
1. PLEASURABLE PURSUITS.
your interest.
How to choose an organization of
To do:
1. Have members of the various school organizations give
talks explaining what their particular club does, the
amount of extra time, it takes, and what extra expense
is necessary .for dues, parties, etc.
2. As a class prepare two lists on the blackboard of the
beneficial and the detrimental factors resulting from
joining a club. Discuss each list and decide if there
are enough benefits derived from joining or if it is
balanced the other way.
3. Tell the class of any elub experience you have had,
and whether you gained from it or not.
To decide:
1. How dan you be sure of getting into the right club of
your interest?
2. Whatare the main things you expect to get from your
elub of a beneficial nature and why do you expect such?
3. What are the advantages of belonging to a school club?
4. How many school clubs or organizations should you belong
to?
5. How much time should you give to your school clubs?
6. What added expense wijl joining a club necessitate?
7. What additional time will you have to take for field
trips away from your work and home?.
To read:
1. Harry C. McKown:
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co., 1S29)
2. Harry C. McKown:
Co., 1927)
Extra-curricular Activities
(The Macmillan
-
44
2. THE SPARK PLUG.
successful
How to help make your organization
To dps
1. Have a member of one of the cities service clubs give
a talk on what qualifications are necessary for a good
club member.
2. Make a list of the main factors that you can do to help
, make your club more successful. Present these to the
class for discussion.
3. In a class panel discuss the personal traits necessary
which aid in successful club work.
4. Divide the class in half and have a debate on what
should be done with the non-cooperative elub members.
How can their ways be corrected for the club’s best
interest?
5. Interview each other in class and find out what individ­
ual steps he takes to make his elub more successful.
To decide!; *
1. What are the chief factors necessary for a successful
organization?
2. What characteristics of an individual are necessary in
making a club successful?
3. How can you aid your club?
4. How can your club aid you?
To read:
1. Harry C. McKown:
2. S. Blackburn:
1927)
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co. , 1929)
Our High School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co.,
45
3. HEAD MAN*
How to conduct meetings.
To do ;
1* Make a list on the blackboard of the proper procedure
in conducting a meeting.
2. Choose representatives from the class to conduct a
meeting showing the correct manner. Point out any
fault when you think something has been done incorrectly.
3. Discuss ways and means of keeping a meeting on the issue
being discussed and not wandering off to unimportant
conversation.
4. Discuss common courtesies expected at a meeting from
the club members.
5. Take turns during the school year in conducting home
room meetings.
To decide:
1. How can you get your meeting started smoothly?
2. What should be done after the opening eerimonies?
3. How can you get the preliminary reports out of the way?
4.
In what manner should you dispose of old business?
5. How can you gain the club’s approval of new business?
6. When should you officially close the meeting?
To read:
1. Harry C. McKown:
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co., 1929)
2. E. V. Thomas, Tindal and J. D. Meyers:
School Life (The Macmillan Co., 1924)
Junior High
46
4. A COG IN THE WHEEL*
How to serve on a committee
To do;
1* Discuss the place and need of committees in an organization*
2. Plan a party. The chairman will divide the elass to all
will be on a eopaittee*
3. Meet with your committee and make a list of your objectives
in making the party a success.
4. Set a definite date and give a party.
#7)
(See Chapter IV,
To decides
1. Can you do good work en a committee of
2* How much time should
strangers?
you spend with acommittee?
3. How can you best help your committee?
4* How important is any committee?
5. What is the main purpose of having a committee?
6. How much does the welfare of any organization depend upon
good committees?
To read*
1. Harry C. McKown: Extra-currioular Activities
Macmillan Col, 1927]
(The
2. J. 1. Vinegard: Student Participation in School Govern­
ment (The Macmillan Co., 1933)
S* frn WBITTSB WOED*
How to write a constitution.
jo do t
1* Study your school constitution*
Z, Outline on the board the fundamental section of a
• constitution*.
3* Divide .into committees and draw up a constitution
govern lug home rooms*
4* Discuss with the class each committee *s constitution#
To decide;
1* How do you profit by our national constitution; state
constliution; school constitution?
2m Whet are the advantages of having a good constitution?
3. Why should your school have a constitution?
4* What is the most important section in the school consti­
tution?
5# How would you proceed to'make a change in your school
constitution?
0* How can you best display your understanding of your
school constitution* state constitution, and national
constitution?
To read;
1. Harry 0. Melown;
School Olnba
(The Macmillan Co*, 1929)
2* Jm '3* .•?!negard; ■ Student Participation in School
Government (The H 8 m O T a B ^ o T 7 l ^ S S T W'
48
S* GETTING EVEN.
How to plan a club initiation
To do:
1. Discuss the need for both formal and informal initiations.
2. List on the board the desired outcomes of a formal
initiation.
3. Discuss the items in number 2.
4. List on the board as many items as possible for
informal initiation.
an
5. Discuss the items in number 4 and eliminate any which
are not practical or might be embarrassing.
To decide:
1. How can you make your club a better one by having a
nice formal initiation?
2. What elements of club unity should be shown in a formal
initiation?
3. In what ways can an informal initiation be distasteful
to new members?
4. Do initiations make some, students not desirous of be­
coming club members?
5. How can you help your club in holding initiations?
6. Why should initiations be given?
To read*
11 ,Harry G. McKown:
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co., 1929)
2. J. I. Vinegard: Student Participation in School
Government (The Macmillan Co., 1935)
49
7. ICE CREAM AND CAKE.
How to plan school parties
To do:
1. Have a committee report on the date of party and the
necessary procedure to gain permission for a school
party.
2. Make a list on the board of what any home room, club, or
organization must do to have official permission.
3. Discuss the necessity for having to secure official
permission
4. Have a final check up of committees for party as started
in lesson 4 of this chapter.
To decide:
1. How can you help your school when you give a school party?
2. Why should you invite your principal and one or two teachers?
3. How can you be sure your school parties will be a success?
4. What are the advantages of being able to have a party at
school?
5. Why is it important that you follow school regulations at
a school party?
6. Why should you know how to arrange for anp: give a party?
To read:
1. Harry C. McKown: Extr a-curr icular Activities
Macmillan Co., 19271
(The
2. Willard B. Canopy: The High School Stunt, Show, and
Carnival (T. S. Denison, 19291
50
8* M. C.fs.
How to plan student assemblies
To do s
1. List on the board those factors you think a good program
should have.
2* Pick out the most essential through class discussion
and plan how much time is to be given to entertainment,
talks and announcements.
3. Appoint committees to arrange for entertainments and
talks.
4. Arrange in class the order of the programs checking
them against item number one.
5. Make the proper arrangements to present the program
to the school.
To decidet
1. How should a program be properly balanced to be most
enjoyed by the students?
2. What kind of entertainment and how much should be
arranged for?
3. How much time should be given to talks, announcements
and school yells?
4. Should any centralized theme be carried through out
; the programs?
5. What is a good arrangement for an enjoyable program?
To read:
1. Harry McKown:
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co., 1929)
2. J". iT. Vinegards Student Participation in School
Government (The Macmillan Co., 19331
51
9. VOTING MACHINES.
How to plan school electi6ns
To do;
1. Have that portion of your school constitution read which
governs elections.
2. Invite your class counsel member to give a talk explaining
the electoral board.
3. Invite your student body president to explain qualifica­
tions necessary to run for a school office*
4. Discuss with your counsel member and student body president
how you ean best help at the coming school election.
To decide:
1. How can you best help your class counsel member?
2. How can you best help the electoral board of your school?
3. What is the similarity between your class counsel member
and your state representative or senator?
4. What cap you do to vote intelligently at your school
elections?
5* What do you have to do to trun for a school office?
6. How can you be sure of properly qualifying for the job
you want?
To read:
1. Harry McKown:
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co., 1929)
2. J. I. Vinegard: Student Participation in School
Government (The Macmillan Co., 1933)
52
10* A BIG SHOT#
How to chose your sport
To do:
1* Have a talk by the school coach or the director of
one of the various sports.
2. Find out from him how much time is necessary, what
physical demands each sport makes, and if you are
handicapped what would be the best sport for you.
3. Observe people playing various sports and try the ones
that interest you.
To decide*
1. What are the benefits from participating in school
sports?
2* What physical requirements do the various sports
require?
3. For what sport are you best suited?
4. How can your physical characteristics limit your
choice of a sport?
5* How much time should you plan to give to a sport?
To read:
1. Harry McKbwn:
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co., 1929]
2* Louis Persby:
Adventures in Sport
(Gain, 1937)
I
CHAPTER
V
HOW TO FOSTER AND MAINTAIN SCHOOL SPIRIT
The fundamental objective of this chapter is to
aid the pupil in his extra-curricular participations and
through it instill the main concepts of his obligations
to his school and classmates.
The attitude and manner
in which he holds his school and its organizations while
he is in school will determine to a large extent his future
regard of any organization of which he might be a part.
By
calling his attention to what has been done in the past in
his school, the pupil will be more concerned as to what he
can do to perpetuate "the standards and traditions.
The
pupil’s experience in learning how to organize and direct
large groups; his training in securing the cooperations
of people and firms outside the school; and his desire
for wanting to do the right thing are all foundational
structures of his enjoyment for after school years.
This
chapter intends to bring about those thing which, not only
deal with those things the pupil is actively interested in
now, but prepares him more roundly and fully for society’s
demands when he is through his schooling.
54
1.
UNITED WE STAND.
How to build school spirit
To do;
1 . In two columns on the board list the contributing
and building factors of school spirit and those things
which limit school spirit and tear it down.
2. Discuss how you can help in building school spirit.
3. Discuss what can be done to eliminate the undesirable
factors listed in column two on the board.
4. Have a talk bya senior student
has meant to him.
on what>his school
5. Tell the class of what your school means to you now.
and what you want it to mean in the future.
To decide:
1. How does a good school spirit make for a better school?
2. How should you look upon school spirit in the light
of your community, home and self?
3. What are the contributing factors which make up school
spirit?
4. How does your approval or disapproval of school activities
effect school spirit?
5. How does your interest and participation in activities
affect school spirit?
6. How can you, through the proper school spirit, make
your school a better one?
To read:
1. Harry McKown:
School Clubs
2. Walton-B. Bliss:
(The Macmillan Co., 192-9)
Your.School and You
(Allyn and Bacon)
55
2. PUBLIC INVITED.
and friends
How to sell your school to your parents
To do:
1. List on the board the reasons for having the interest of
your parents and friends in your school.
2. Appoint a committee to meet with the other freshman home
rooms to arrange for an assembly honoring parents and
friends.
3. Discuss with your committee the outstanding qualities of
your school you would like to have brought out at the
assembly.
4. Discuss in class what you will do to further interest
your parents and friends.
To decide:
1 . What can you do to interest outsiders in your school?
2.
How can you best display the best qualities of your school?
3.
How can you best eliminate those qualities hot desired?
4.
How can you make your school more interesting at home?
5.
How can you further support the schools teams and activ­
ities?
6. Do you think your parents and friends should be interested
in your school? Why?
To read:
1. Harry McKown:
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Co., 1929)
2. Barry MeKown:
Home Room Guidance
(McGraw-Hill, 1934)
3. OUTSIDE CAPITAL.
firms
How to cooperate with the city’s business
To do:
1. Make a list of the business firms and after each firm
tell how they can aid in school activities.
2. From the list of business firms tell the class how you
can materially show your appreciation for their help;*
3. Discuss the necessity of having good cooperation between
the school and the business firms in town.
To decide;
1. What are the main reasons of having the good-will of the
city’s business firms?
2. How can you show them that you can help their business
through your school?
3. What are the best ways to acknowledge aids and held which
have been given by the business men?
4. What is the best procedure in securing the cooperation
of the business firms for a school activity?
5* How much help should be asked for the business firms and
what should the nature of that help be?
To read:
1. Diemer and Mullen:
Public Citizenship
(World, 1930)
i
2. W. G. Hunter:
1922)
Civic Science in the Community
(jlmerican,
57
4. BROADCAST WHISPERS.
How to act in school assemblies'
To do:
1. Invite your principal to talk and explain his views of
assembly behavior.
2. Write down what you believe to be the most important
points.
3. Discuss your list with the rest of the class.
4. List the best points of the entire class on the board
and copy in your notebook.
5. Compare assembly behavior with behavior in shows and
other public gatherings.
To decide:
1. How should you politely ask classmates to refrain from
talking?
2 . If you set an example for others to follow would it
prove helpful?
3. What are the chief sources of annoyance in assembly?
4. How can you avoid and help others avoid annoyances?
5. Should the same manners be exemplified in assembly as in
church?
6. What kind of an attitude should you have toward assemblies?
7/ Do your attitudes and manners cause assemblies to be good
or poor?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
2* Sophie Hadida:
Society in Action
(Inor, 1936}
Manners for Millions
(Doubleday Doran, 1933)
58
5. BOOHS#
How to act at games
To do:
1# Invite one of the coaches in to explain the student’s
part in attending games♦
2. Discuss: How organized cheering helps the team and
makes a more interesting event for your parents and
friends.
3. List on the hoard those qualities which are desirable at
games. Also list those qualities which are not desirable
but ones you have noticed.
4. Discuss the good and bad qualities noticed at games and try
to reach some definite conclusion as to eliminating the
poor ones. Put the conclusion on the board and copy in
your notebook.
5. For a week talk up behavior at games.
of the school in this drive.
Interest the rest
To decide:
1. Whyis it better to have organized cheering sections?
2. How can you help your parents and friends to enjoy
attending the games?
3. Why do some students insist upon bringing attention to
themselves at games?
4# How can you help correct the show offs at games?
5* How can you get the. most enjoyment from a game?
6. How does your :behavior affect a team representing your
school?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
Society in Action (Inor, 1936)
2. Elizabeth Woodard:
Personality Preferred (Harpers, 1935)
59
6. THE GANG’S AXL HERE.
How to use school organizations
To do:
1. List on the board those organizations in school which
might be used to advertise games, plays, shows, etc.
2. Appoint committees to interview the heads of the organ­
izations listed on the board.
3. Discuss in class what part each organization can fill
a and how many students involved and how much notice you
must give to secure their services.
4. Discuss the need of these school organizations and the
support they should have*
To decide:
1. How canyou secure aid from a school organization for a
parade, a play, or a tea?
2. How canyou become a member of one of these organizations?
3. In what way do these organizations help the school, the
community?
4. How can you best aid your school organizations?
5* How much time and effort are you willing to put in for
a school organization?
6. How can good organizations make for a better school?
To read:
1. Harry C. MclCown:
School Clubs
(The Macmillan Go., 1929)
2* Harry C. MclCown:
Co., 1929)
Extra-curricular Activities (The Macmillan
60
7. THE HECKLER’S HECKEL.
How to act at school plays
To do:
1. Invite your drama coach to explain how plays and cast
are chosen, and how much time is spent rehearsing*
£• List on the board the outcomes of participating in a
dramatic production*
3. List on the board those qualities of behavior which
should be eliminated at plays.
4. Discuss constructive criticisms versus ridicule*
5. Discuss the advisability of making it a class project
to foster better behavior at plays*
To decide:
1. How can you get the most for your money at a school play?
2. How can you help others to enjoy the plays?
3* How much time would you be willing to give in order to
help foster a play?
4. What kind of treatment or courtesy would you expect from
the audience?
5* What are the three most important benefits from play
experience?
To read:
1. Elinor Aimes:
£• Sophie Hadida:
1933)
Modern Etiquette
(W* of Block, 1935)
Manners for Millions
(Doubleday Doran,
61
8 . THE BAND PLAYED ON.
How to act at music concerts
To do:
1. Invite your musical director to explain how to listen to
music.
2. Make a list on the hoard of the outstanding points of
the musical director’s talk.
3. Discuss these points and copy them in your notebook.
4. Listen to records as chosen by the musical director.
To decide:
1. How can you enjoy music by knowing how to listen?
2. How can you help the performers on the stage?
3. How can you show your understanding of good performance?
4. Whyis music called the universal language?
5. How does music affect your life?
6. How can you help further music?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
2. Bauer:
Scoiety in Action
Twentieth Century Music
(Inor, 1936)
(Putman, 1933)
62
9. SEETHING HUMANITY.
How to act in the halls
To do:
1. Make a list of good manners to be recommended and used
in the halls.
2. Make a list of the common faults of students in the
halls with suggestions of how they can be eliminated.
3. Tell the class of same occurrence in the hall which
you believe unmannerly and impolite pnd see if they
agree with you.
4. Write out five advantages and their outcomes of the
development of good manners in the halls.
5. Plan a drive for better manners in your school halls.
Appoint committees to carry out the necessary work of
making the school aware of the need and what should
be done about it.
5. Have new students tell of the way halls were managed in
previous schools they have attended.
To decide:
1. How can your actions and the action^ of others cut
down on congestion and unnecessary waiting on the
stairways?
2. What can you do
to prevent unnecessary talkingand
shouting in the hall?
3. How much
consideration, shouldyou give toothers?
4. How can you aidothers in the hall?
5. What kind of rules of the road should be observed in
the halls?
To read:
1. Sophie Hadida:
1933)
2. Helen Halter:
Manners for Millions (Doubleday Doran,
Society in Action (Inor Publishing Co., 1936)
63
1G. BRAINS UNINCORPORATED.
How to act in the classrooms.
To do:
1. As a class compile a list of those qualities desired for
good behavior in the classrooms.
2. Each member of the class make two copies of their list
and at the direction of your chairman post them in the
classrooms assigned to you.
3. Discuss in class how better classroom behavior might
result in higher grades.
4. Tell an experience or observation wherein poor behavior
has brought on bad results.
To decide:
1. What can you do to act better in the classroom?
♦
2. How does classroom action affect grades?
3. How does the classroom behavior of others affect your
work?
4. How can you help others to strive for better classroom
behavior?
5. In what ways will classroom work become easier and more
enjoyable?
6. How can your teacher be of more help to a class which
behaves well than to one which does not behave so well?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
2. R. B. McKoane:
Society in Action
The Way to Learn
(Inor, 1936)
(Allyn and Bacon, 1931)
64
11. YOU LUCKY PEOPLE#
How to act on the campus
To do:
1. Relate to the class an example of poor campus behavior
you have observed.
2# Make a list oh the board of these outstanding observa­
tions of the class.
3. Discuss what you might do individually and as a class to
help foster better campus bbhavior.
4. Discuss how good campus behavior makes a better school
to attend and how it will help make you a better citizen.
To decide:
1. How
can
you improve your campus behavior?
2. How
can
you help improve the campus behaviorof
others?
3. In what way does campus behavior reflect upon the entire
school?
4. How
can
friendliness be fostered by good campus
behavior?
5. Why
should desired campus behavior be a partof your
responsibility?
6. What life-like situation might be compared to campus
behavior?
To read:
1. Elizabeth Woodward:
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
2. R. L.Ashley: The Practice of Citizenship in the Home,
School. Business and Community (The Macmillan Co., 1923)
65
12* A STRANGER.IN TOWN; How to act when representing the
school away from home
To do:
1. Discuss in class the desirability of creating good im­
pressions when away from home.
2. Tell of observations you have made when students from
other schools have visited your school.
3. Make a list on the board, of the good observations and
those which are not desirable.
4. Copy the list in your notebook for future reference.
To decide;
1. How
can you be sure you will create a favorable impres­
sion where you visit another school?
2* Do you-expect the same treatment when visiting that you
give to visitors?
3. Why is it always a pleasure to visit certain schools
many times while to visit other schools once is suf­
ficient?
4.
How
can
5. How
can
schools?
you
make yourself wanted again?
you broaden your personality byvisiting other
6. How does making new friends broadennyour scope of
learning?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
2. W.. 0. Stevens:
Society in Action
The Correct Thing
(Inor, 1936)
(Dodd-Mead, 1934)
66
13. VERBAL DAGGERS#
How to treat visiting students
To do s
1. Discuss the need of promoting better school spirit
among schools#
2# Discuss the desirability of creating favorable impressions
on your visitors.
3. List the desired outcomes of visiting, students to your
school.
4. Invite an outstanding student of some neighboring school
to visit and explain what he likes and dislikes about
your school.
To decide:
1. Can politeness in sports be obtained among rival schools?
2# How can you help visiting students during their visit?
3. Why should you be desirous of creating a pleasant stay
for outside visitors?
4# How can these qualities formed now be of help later in
life?
5. How can you be sure outside visitors will want to return?
6# Should you plan any party or reception for visitors from
other schools?
To read:
1. W* 0. Stevens:
The Correct Thing
2. Elizabeth Woodward:
(Dodd-Mead, 1934)
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
67
14. MASSED POWER.
How to organize and conduct parades
To d o :
1. Invite your city’s mayor, chief of police or a council
member to explain your city’s policy regarding parades.
2. Discuss with your speaker the reason for the city’s
ordinances in regard to parades, also what procedure is
necessary to gain their permission for parades.
3. From class discussion list on the board how a parade
should be organized and the reasons for a planned line
of march.
4. List on the board those organizations whose help you
need to make a parade a success.
5. Appoint committees to contact and make arrangements for
a parade.
To decide:
1. What place do parades have in school activities?
2. How can you profit from organizing a parade?
3* How can you help your school in a parade?
4. In what ways can a parade bring the community and school
together?
5. In what ways can a school parade be of help to the
community?
6. How can you be sure your parade will be successful?
To read:
?There is no material written for such activities”—
quote: P. C. Conn, U.S*C. Band Director.
Suggest you visit the Director of Music in your school.
68
15. MOB SPIRIT.
How to organize and conduct pep rallies
To do:
1. Discuss in class what the desired outcomes of a pep
rally are and how a pep rally affects school spirit.
2. Outline on the board the course of events for a peprally.
3. Divide into committees and contact all speakers and
organizations wanted for your pep rally.
4. Set a date and get out announcements for the coming
pep rally.
To decide:
1. How can you through a pep rally show appreciation to
your teams?
2. In what ways does a pep rally help form school spirit?
3. How can participation in organizing a pep rally be of
help in later life?
4. How does a pep rally make your school mean more to you?
5. Hoiv important is a pep rally to winning teams?
6. How can you profit from a pep rally?
To read:
1. "There is no material written for such activities"
quote: P. C. Conn, director of U.S.C. Band.
2. Suggest you see your high school coach or band director.
69
16. YOUR FRIEND GYM.
How to use gymnasium equipment
To do:
1. List the gym equipment you use and the advantages you
receive from it.
2. Place the approximate price on the equipment you use,
taking everything into consideration and compare this
with your home equipment.
3. Tell.the class what you consider the main reason for
the disappearance of equipment and what should he
done to stop it.
4. Have a demonstration of the variou uses of some of
the equipment.
To decide;
1. How
should equipment be
checked out and returned?
2. How
should equipment be
taken care of, whenit belongs
to you, your friend or the school?
3.
How
can you respect the
of equipment?
rights of others byyour use
4. How
important is it that all equipment bechecked in
and not taken from the school?
5. How
can you aid in keeping equipment fromleavingthe
school?
6. How can you help prevent accidents in the showers?
To read:
1. Brown and Adams:
Co., 1935)
Conduct and Citizenship
2. Walton B. Bliss:
Your School and You
(The Macmillan
(Allyn and Bacon)
70
17.
A PERSONAL LOAN*
How to use school equipment
To do:
1* Make a list on the board of school equipment provided
for your use and the benefits you derive from it.
2. Discuss the list on the board and what you can do to
properly take care of it.
3. Invite your school principal to explain the expense
involved in such school equipment and how it , is provided
for your use.
:
4. Relate any abuses of school equipment you have observed
and what should be done to avoid repetition in the
future.
To decide:
1. How can you save your parents money in the use of school
equipment?
2. How can you be considerate of your classmates in the use
of school equipment?
3. What should be your action be if you observe a classmate
abusing school equipment?
4. Would it be better if students had to furnish their own
equipment or be assessed for the use of school equipment?
5. How can you best use school equipment?
6. How does poor working equipment affect student body
spir it?
To read:
1. Walton B. Bliss:
Your School and You
(Allyn, and Bacon)
2. Brown and Adams:
Co., 1935)
Conduct and Citizenship
(The Macmillan
CHAPTER
VI
*
HOW TO DISPLAY PERSONAL ATTRACTIVENESS
This chapter ahtieipates the questions of the pupil.
Such questions are seldom ever asked by the adolescent boy
or girl of this age, yet the desire for an answer weighs
heavily in his mind.
The desire to do the right thing at
the right time is fundamental in seeking society’s approval.
Often times;the choice is influenced by a group leader or
someone who is looked upon in admiration.
Consequently the
younger pupil is apt to mimic manners of some older pupil
whom he admires and unknowingly be incorrect because of his
admirer’s lack of knowledge.
Also it is not the intention
of this writer to infer that there is no home training along
this line, but it is the intention to accentrate that which
has taken place in the home.
Such material coming from an
outside source is often received more warmly and openly than
from somermember of the immediate family.
The units included are by no means a complete train­
ing but are considered only a foundation upon which a more
completecsocial personality can be constructed.
72
1. PALAVER PASTIME.
How to converse interestingly
To do:
1. From a list of suggested topics on the board converse,
when called upon, with your classmate on your right. •
2. Make a list on the blackboard of common faults of
conversation and how they can be corrected.
3. From the list just completed add the most desirable
traits of a good conversationalist and check your faults
against them.
4. Tell of ways by which you are going to try and correct
your own faults.
5. Tell the class of some observation of poor conversation
heard in or out of school.
6. Tell of instances when your ability to converse interest­
ingly might be of great importance.
To decide:
1. How to find out what topic of conversation is most
interesting to your friends.
2. How can you change the subject without hurting anyone’s
feelings?
>
3. How to be a good listener.
4. How
to be a good talker.
5. What factors are important in your talking?
6. How can you disagree and still be polite?
To read:
1. Elizabeth Woodward:
2. Dick Carlson:
Bureau, 1933)
Personality Preferred
Personal Development
(Harpers, 1935)
(Personal Research
73
2. FELLOW MEN.
How to consider your classmates.
To do:
1. Make a list of those things you expect of others in
their consideration for you.
2. Make a list of the considerations you try to give to
others.
3. Discuss these lists in class and place the best of each
• on the board.
4. List on the board various situations in which special
consideration should be given to others.
To decide:
1. How does your consideration of others affect their
consideration of you?
2. Why is it necessary to give some consideration to
others?
3. How can you improve your personality in the consideration
of mothers?
4. Should you give the same consideration to your classmates
in the class room as on the campus?
5. How can consideration improve school spirit?
6. How can you profit by being always considerate to others?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
Society in Action
2. Elizabeth Woodward:
(Inor, 1936)
Personality [Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
74
3. THE DICTATORS.
How to consider your elders
To do:
1 . Discuss in class qualities of respect you believe should
be given to your elders,
2. Discuss whether more pespect should be given your parents
than your adult friends or teachers.
3. Relate to the class instances of disrespect you have
observed in Others.
4. List on the board all items of proper consideration
which should be given to your elders.
To decide;
1. How can you increase your personality and friendships by
being more considerate of your elders?
2. What are the advantages of being known as a person who
is considerate of his elders?
3. What should be the differences, if any in your con­
sideration of your parents and other adults?
4. How much older should a person be to be considered your
elder?
5. How can you help your classmates and school by always
being respectful?
6. In what ways is respectfulness noticeable in your class­
mates?
To read:
1. W. 0. Stevens;
The Correct Thing
(Dodd-Mead, 1934)
2. Beatrice Pierce: It *s More Fun When You Know the Rules
(Farrar and Rinehart, 1935)
75
4. CUBLY CUES.
How to care for your hair
To do:
1. Discuss in class how harmful results might occur in caring
for your hair.
2*
List these on the hoard.
3. Discuss how benefits are acquired by proper care of the hair.
4. List on the board the aids to use in proper care of the
ha ir.
5. Discuss care of the hair from a health standpoint. -.
6.
Invite a beautician to talk to the class about caring
for the hair.
To decide;
1. How can you be sure the hair preparations you use are
not harmful?
2. How can you improve your personal appearance by knowing
how to properly care for your hair?
3. Why is it important to take proper care of your hair?
4. How can well eared for hair be to your advantage?
5. What have you observed in others in their care of their
hair which you do not like?
6. How
can you help others profit by your knowledge of
proper care of the hair?
7. How can your health be jeopardized by improper hair care?
To read:
1. Phillips;
Skin Deep
2# Wheat-Fitzpatrick:
1935)
(Consumer’s Research, 1936)
Everyday Problems in Health (American,
76
5. THE FEEDERS.
How to care for
your hands
To do:
1. Discuss the reasons for caring for your hands.
2. List these reasons on the hoard.
3.
Discuss the proper care of the hands in regards to
health and sanitation.
4. List in your notebook things you have observed in others
in their care of their hands which you do not like.
Explain why you do not like them.
5. Discuss othe use of nail polish as seen inschool, at
parties and dances, and on the street.
6.
Invite a qualified person to explain how to properly
care for the hands.
To decide:
1. Why
should your hands be as clean as possible at all
times?
2. In what ways can infection and disease be spread by your
hands?
;
3. Why should you not let your nails become too long?
4. How should you trim your nails for the proper care of
them?
5. When, where, and how much should nail polish be used?
6.
Should you attempt to correct someone else if they are
improperly caring for their hands?
To read:
1.
Wheat-Fitzpatrick:
(American, 1935)
2. Phillips:
Skin Deep
Everyday Problems in Health
(Consumer’s Research, 1936)
77
6. THE SHINING LIGHT.
How to care for your face
To do:
1. List on the board those things believed to be beneficial
for proper care of the face.
2. List on the board those things which you believe to be
harmful for the proper care of the face.
3.
Discuss the use of face creams and lotions and what
their effect is.
4.
Discuss the use of lip stick, rouge, and eye shadow.
5.
Discuss the practice of plucking the eye brows, curling
the lashes.
6.
Invite a doctor or qualified person to explain how to
properly care for the face.
To decide,:«
1. How can you best care for
2.
your facet
Why should you be carefulabout the use of
face lotions?
cosmetics and
3. In what way can you improve your natural looks and well
being by;~properly caring for your face?
4. How-can you learn to properly apply and use
cosmetics?
5. Where should you not wear
the face be washed?
howoften should
6.
cosmeticsand
How can you be sure in caring for your face to not risk
infection?
To read:
1. Wheat-Fitzpatrick:
1935)
2.
Phillips:
Skin Deep
Everyday Problems in Health
(Consumer’s Research, 1936)
(American,
78
7* CLOTHES HANGER.
How to dress to your advantage.
To do:
1.
Discuss the evolution of dress and compare today’s
style with styles of years ago in regards to health and
freedom.
2. List in your notebook the clothes you have for various
occasions and compare with the rest of the class.
3. Discuss and list on the board the various functions
which require different
clothes.
4. Discuss the buying and wearing of clothes to fit your
physical make up.
5. Invite a qualified person to explain how to dress to
your best advantage.
To decide:
1. How can you
best buy your clothes
to fit
yourfigure?
2. In what way do stripes and checks affect tall and short
people?
3. Why do certain colors look better than others on an
individual?
4. How can you receive the most wear from your clothes?
5. Why should you know about shirt sizes, sleeve and collar,
suit sizes, hose and shoe sizes?
6.
Why do someappear sloppy even though their clothes are
expensive?
To read:
1. W.
0.
Stevens:
The Correct Thing
2. Elizabeth Woodward:
(Dodd and Mead, 1934)
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
79
8. MIX WELL.
How to make friends
To do i
1* List on the blackboard the qualities you desire in
your friends.
2.
Check through the [email protected] to see if you have the qualities
you desire your friends to have.
3. What factors or qualities keep you from making friends
with some people? List these and give suggestions
telling how these might be overcome.
4. Make a list of what you believe are your bestqualities
and compare your list with the desired qualities, already
listed on the blackboard.
5. Demonstrate how to introduce people and what should
be said in acknowledgement.
6.
Tell of an experience where a fri&ndin need was
freind indeed.
a
To decide:
1. In how many ways can you improve yoursblf by the right
choice of companions?
2m What personal factors are most respected in us by our
friends?
3. How can you meet a prospective friend and make him like
you?
4. In how many ways can you be a good friend?
5. What are the main factors for making friends with people
your own age?
6. What
are the advantages of making friends with older people?
7. Yjfhat are the advantages of making friends with younger people?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
2.
Society in Action
Wheatley and Malltoy:
(Ginn, 1935)
(Inor, 1936)
Building Character and Personality
80
9. LAIJGH CLOWH LAUGH.
How to keep your feelings to yourself
To do:
1. Relate to the class an instance when you did not care
to hear or know the feelings of someone else.
2.
Discuss in class the advisability of not telling your
troubles to everyone.
5. List on the board the times when you should tell your
feelings and the times when you should not.
4. Keep a record on yourself to see if you. are one who can
not keep his feelings to himself.
♦
To decides
1. How can you keep your feelings to yourself and still
solve your difficulties?
2. What
are the reasons for telling someone else?
3. How can you help someone who confides his feelings to
you?
4* In what ways can friendships be spoiled by not keeping
personal feelings to oneself?
5. What type of person is usually not able to keep his
feelings to himself?
6. How
can you best get al&ng with everyone?
To reads
1. Helen Halter:
Society in Action
2. Elizabeth Woodward:
(Inor, 1936)
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
81
10.
NO ONE HURT.
How to be tactful
To do;
1. List on the board all the meanings of the word tactful
as given by the class.
2$ Discuss these meanings and choose the one best suited.
3. Relate to the class an instance where a tactful word or
act was well performed.
4. Discuss with the class the benefits of being tactful.
5. In the situations explained by the teacher explain how
you would be tactful.
To decide:
1. How can you learn to be more tactful?
2* How can being tactful be to your advantage?
3. How can you tell when to be tactful and when not to be?
4. How can being tactful help you in your school and home
life?,
5. When can being tactful be carried too far?
6. What
type of person is said to be very tactful?
7. What positions call for very tactful people?
To read:
1. Sophie Hadida:
1933)
2.
Manners for Millions
Elizabeth Woodward:
(Doubleday Doran,
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
82
11. THE COXJHT OF 10.
How to control your temper
To do:
1. List on the board the reasons why a person should never
lose his temper.
2. List on the board what takes place within you when you
lost your temper.
3. Discuss with the class how to control your temper.
Make allist of the suggestions offered.
4. Copy the list of suggestions in your notebook for
future personal check-up.
5. Invite a member of your police department to talk about
temper control and some serious outcomes of people who
did not control their tempers.
To decide:
1. How can you help yourself to control your temper?
2. How can a person who can not control his temper get into
trouble?
3. Why is an uncontrollable temper bad on a person*s
physical well being?
4. What is the best nthing to do when you are around a person
who loses his temper?
5. How Gan you make more friends by being able to control
your temper?
To read:
1.
2.
Elizabeth Woodward:
Wheatley and Mallony:
(Ginn, 1936)
Personality Preferred
(Harper, 1935)
Building Character and Personality
83
12. SOUED YOUR ’A ’.
How to be yourself
To do :
1. Discuss the reasons why some people pretend so much/.
2. List these reasons on the board and opposite each one
list suggestions to help overcome such causes for
pretending.
3. Discuss in class why pretending is bad and how a person’s
personality can be affected by it.
- 4. Tell of an instance when pretending got you or someone
else in trouble or embarrassment.
5. Invite an outside speaker to discuss the necessity of
being yourself and not a pretender.
To decide:
1. How can you definitely be sure that you do not like to
pretend and are always yourself?
2. How can you hurt yourself with your friends and
associates by pretending?
3. In what way can pretending affect your personality?
4. Why is it important for people to know you as you are
and not what you would like to be?
5. How can you be sure your friends are sincere and not
pretending?
6.
Why does a person who acts himself have more friends
than one who pretends?
To read:
1. Elizabeth Woodward:
2. Wheatley and Mallony:
(Ginn, 1935)
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
Building Character and Personality
------- -----------------------
84
15. THE PEOPLE BELOW.
How to be thoughtful of others
To do:
1. List on the board the little things which can be done to
show others you are thoughtful of them.
2. Discuss with the class things you have noticed which
resulted from thoughtfulness of tothers.
3. List on the board annoyances you have noticed at home,
the theater, at parties, and in school.
4. List in your notebook ways in which thoughtfulness can
be shown in the following: visiting sick friends,
attending a show, playing the radio, attending public
gatherings.
To decide:
1. How can you show thoughtfulness of your parents and
neighbors?
2. How can
you show thoughtfulness when you areat home?
3. In what ways does thoughtfulness from others affect you?
4. How does thoughtfulness to others make better under­
standing and friendships?
5. How canthoughtlessness often be disastrous?
6.
What isthe excuse for not being thoughtful of others?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
2.
W. 0. Stevens:
Society v in Action
The Correct Thing
(Inor , 1936)
(Dodd^Mead, 1934)
85
14. YOUR*RE WRONG.
How to be a good sport
To do:
1. List on the board those qualities of a good sport.
E. Discuss in class why being a good sport is one of the
best abilities attainable*
3. With the class work out an all around definition of a
good sport.
4. Invite your school coach to talk about sportsmanship in
sports and being a good' sport in your daily life.
5. Take notes of the coaches* talk and file in your notebook.
6. Ask
your speaker any question you might have regarding
his talk.
To decide:
1. How should you differentiate between sportsmanship in
sports and being a good sport in your daily life?
5. How can you develop the sense of being a good sport
within yourself?
3. How can being a good or poor sport affect your daily
life?
4. Why is it so easy to see poor sportsmanship in others
and not in yourself?
5-. Why do you enjoy having good sports for your friends?
6. How
can you be a good sport when you do not like to lose
or be defeated?
To read:
1. Louis Persby:
Adventures in Sport
Broome and Adams:
1935)
(Ginn, 1937)
Conduct and Citizenship
(The Macmillan^
86
15. HIGH GOAL MAN.
How to be self-confident
To do s
1.
Discuss in class the difference between confidence and
conceit; confidence and arrogance; and confidence and
bluff.
2.
List in your notebook the ways in which confidence may
be developed.
3. Discuss your list with the class. Put the list on the
blackboard for further discussion.
4. Tell of an instance when self-confidence was really
bluff.
To decide:
1. How might being self-confident be interpreted as conceit
or bluff?
2. How can you be self-confident and not conceited?
3. How can you through self-confidence do better work?
4. What place does self-confidence have in your daily life?
5. How can making good grades in all your classes develop
self-confidence?
6. What
are your main points of self-confidence?
To read;
1. Elizabeth Woodward:
2.
Wheat-Fitzpatrick:
(American, 1935)
Personality' Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
Everyday Problems in Health
87
16. THE BUILDER.
How to criticize constructively
To do:
1. List on the board the benefits derived from constructive
criticism.
2» Listen to short talks given by members of the class and
offer constructive criticism.
3. Make a list in your notebook of the things you are most
critical of an opposite each tell how you would con­
structively improve them.
4. Listen to a talk by a business man about constructive and
destructive criticism in business life.
To decide:
1. How can you constructively criticize something you are
not familiar with? ■
2. How much of your likes and dislikes are in your
criticisms?
3. How should you receive constructive criticism from a
friend, an adult, an outsider?
4. What are the fundamental items for good constructive
criticism?
5. How can criticism improve you in your work and everyday
life?
6* What
is the most difficult thing in giving criticism?
To read:
1. Elizabeth Woodward:
2.
(
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
Beatrice Pierce: It1s More Hun When You Know the Rules
(Farrar and Rinehart, 1935)
88
17. PERSONAL PRONOUNS.
How to regard the rights of others
To do:
1. List on the hoard all occasions in which the rights of
others must be taken into consideration.
2. Relate
to the class ian instance you have observed in
which the rights of others have been violated.
3. Write a short paper on:
expect.
What rights X have and should
4. Discuss in class what rights have been given by our
Federal constitution and why were they included.
5. Visit a police court and observe cases in which the
rights of others have been violated.
To decide:
1. How can your knowledge of the rights of others increase
added respect for you?
2* Why
do jre have laws and courts to safeguard the rights
of others?
3. How.do the rights of others affect your daily life?
4. What can you do to safeguard your own personal rights?
5. How should the pursuit of happiness be interpreted from
our constitution?
6. When
do your rights or the fights of others cease to
exist?
To read:
1. Sophie Hadida:
1933)
2.
Helen Halter:
Manners for Millions
Society in Action
(Doubleday Doran,
(Inor, 1936)
CHAPTER
VII
‘HOW TO ACQUIRE SOCIAL MANNERS AND COURTESIES
The knowledge of social manners and courtesies form
the basis of life’s path of recreation and enjoyment*
Perhaps at no time in our existence does it assume more
mighty proportions than in adolescence.
Problems and
questions which have long become secondary or inconsequental
to the adult become almost unconquerable obstacles to the
younger person.
Embarrassment from social fox paux not only
cut deep into youth’s pride but often cause a retreat from
the natural development of social graces and manners.
Often
times this retard results in serious consequence to the wellroUnded life we are desirous of living.
If a pupil can
overcome partially, at least, his earlier feats of doing the
right thing he then will have some foundation to build his
future social life upon.
Guidance and help in social manners
and courtesies are not only welcomed by the pupil but are
often solicited.
The units in this chapter are intended as
a help and aid in laying the foundation for social partici­
pation.
90
1. THE GUEST LIST.
How to write and send invitations
To do:
1. List on the hoard the difference in invitations for
different types of.parties.
2.
For each different type listed on the hoard plan and
write out an invitation.
3. List on the hoard the different ways in which an invita
tion may he placed in the hands of the guests.
4. Write an invitation for a special holiday party you
would like to give.
5. Discuss and constructively criticize the invitations
which have heen written in class.
To decide:
1. How can you profit hy knowing how to write a correct
invitation?
2. How can your invitation he a part or suggestion of the
party planned?
3. When should your invitations be funny or clever?
4. When should your invitations he formal and serious?
5. Should all invitations have an R. S. V, P. on them?
6.
How can you best send or present your invitations to your
guest?
7. What are the advantages of knowing about writing and
sending invitations?
To read:
1.
Sophie Hadida:
1933)
2. W. 0. Stevens:
Manners for Millions
The Correct Thing
(Doubleday Doran,
(Dodd-Mead, 1934)
91
2# A RECIPE
(R. S. V. B).
How to answer invitations
To do:
1. List on the board the various ways in which an invitation
may be answered and discuss the need for each,
2# Write out an R.S.V#P. for each of the ways listed on the
board#
3# Invite a member of the Woman’s Club to speak and discuss
invitations#
4# Write down any questions you would like to ask fafter her
talk is over.
To decide:
1# Why
should you answer an invitation in a correct manner?
2# How soon rupon the receipt of an invitation should you
answer it?
3# When should your answer be telephoned or answered verbally?
4# When should you consider an R#S.V#P# unnecessary?
5# How can you be sure your R.S.Y#P# is correct in form?
6# What
steps should be taken after an R,S.V#F, has been
sent and you find it will be impossible to attend?
To read: .
1. Sophie Hadida:
1933)
Manners for Millions
(Doubleday Acran,
2# Beatrice Pierce: It’s More Pun When You Know the Rules
(Farrar and Rinehart, 1935)
92
3. MAIN EVENT.
How to give a party
To do: >
1. Relate to the class how one of the most interesting
parties you ever attended was
given.
2. List on the board the various types of party motifs
and types of parties for special occasions.
3. From the list on the board choose one and plan how you
would give a party.
4. List on the board clever stunts, games, and ideas you
have seen at parties and explain for what type of party
they are suitable.
5. Discuss fun at parties.
To dec ide:
1. How can you get everyone easily acquainted at parties?
2. Where
can you find sources of material on party games?
3. What is the best way to keep everyone occupied at a party?
4. How can you have a party in a small room or your home
and still play games?
.
5. What things can tend to make a party dull and uninteresting?
To read:
1. Mrs. Herbert B. Linscotts
(Ma erae-Smith, 1935)
2.
Hazel C. Maxon:
Parties
Bright Ideas for Entertaining
(E. P. Dutton, 1930)
93
4* DEAR EMILY POST#
How to dress for the occasion
To do:
1# List on the hoard the various school functions which
call for a definite type of wearing apparel for the
occasion.
£. Discuss the advantage and necessity of knowing what to
wear for the occasion.
3. Relate to the class an instance when you were embarrassed
or handicapped by not dressing for the occasion.
4. Invite your home economics teacher to discuss dressing
for the occasion.
To decide:
1. What is the advantage of having the proper clothes on for
the occasion?
2* How can you be sure you are appropriately dressed for a
certain occasion?
3. By dressing correctly for the occasion how can you be
economical or saving on your clothes?
4. What should you do if you find you are not dressed
correctly for the occasion?
5# Why should your concern over being dressed properly be
so important?
6#
Why does society place demands on a person’s attirement?
To read:
1. W.
0.
Stevens:
£. Helen Halter:
The Correct Thing
Society in Action
(Dodd-Mead, 1934)
(Inor, 1936)
94
5. JITTERBUGS.
How to conduct yourself at a dance
To do:
1. List on the board things you do not like to see boys and
girls do at a dance.
2.
Class discussion on these lists and make a list of proper
conduct for any dance.
3. Explain to the class how you would do the following at a
dance: Escort a girl to her seat; make introductions;
and get dances.
4. List on the board all courtesies that should be thought
of at a dance.
To decide:
1. What can you do to learn to dance?
2. How can you be sure your conduct is proper at a dance?
3. How much should you talk during a dance and what should
you talk about?
4. How often should you dance with your partner?
5. Should you visit the punchbowl with each new partner?
6. How
should proper introductions be made?
7. What courtesy should be shown the host or hostess or
chaperons at a dance?
To read:
1. W. 0. Stevens;
The Correct Thing
2. Elizabeth Woodward:
(Dodd-Mead, 1934)
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
95
6. M.I.K.
How to conduct yourself at the table
To do:
1. Relate to the class any poor mannerism you have observed
in others while eating.
2.
jList on the board all the items you can think of concern­
ing correct behavior at the dinner table.
3. Set up a table in class and demonstrate how you would
assist someone to be seated and how you would pass dishes
and ask for a dish to be passed to you.
4. Invite your home economics teacher to discuss correct
manners and procedures at the table.
To decide:
1. What
2. What
can you learn by observation at the table?
factors should you be constantly aware of when
dining out?
3. What respect should be payed to the head of the table?
4. Why should you be attentive to the actions of the head
of the table?
5. If you are head of the table what are you expected to
to know and do?
6.
How much time in conversation should you give to the
person on your right, your left, and across the table?
To read:
1. Elinor Aimes:
1935)
2.
Sophie Hadida:
1933)
Book of Modern Etiquette
Manners for Millions
(Walter J. Black,
(Doubleday Doran,
96
7. WHATCHAGOT?
How to order from a menu
To do:
1. Bring to class a menu from one of the local restaurants.
2.
Compare these menus in class and place on the board the
general outline of their regular dinners.
3. Tell the class how you would order from your menu and
accept any correction an$ correction the class might make.
4. Invite a local restaurant man to explain how you can best
use a menu and save a waitress’ time.
5. Explain what you would do if you did not understand the
names of foods on a menu.
To decide *
1. What are the differences between a regular dinner and an
a-la-carte ordering?
2. How can
you best use amenu when with a large
3. What isthe entree and
group?
what does it generally include?
4. V/hat are the main factors in using and ordering from a
menu?
5. In what sequence should you give your order to the waiter?
6.
Under what circumstances should boys place his partner’s
order?
To read:
1. Wi
0. Stevens:
The Correct Thing
(Dodd-Mead, 1934)
2. Beatrice Pierce: It *s More Fun When You Know the Rules
(Farrar and Rinehart, 1935)
97
q#
HO
SILVER.
How to use table service
To do:
1* Place a card table or any small table in front of the
class and set it with complete service for.an agreed
upon oeassion.
2.
Explain to the class why the service is so arranged and
the use of each article.
3. Relate to the class any instance of improper use of
silverware at the table, that you have observed in others.
4. Discuss in class the use of table service at home and
in public/
5. Make a list in your notebook of the correct uses of
table service. Check the list to see where you can
Improve yourself.
To decidei
1. How can you improve your use of table service?
2. What are the main things to remember in using table
service?
3. Why should you try to be correct at home as well as
away from home?
4. How can you be sure which fork or sp>oon to use?.
5. How important is it that you should receive seme
training at home?
6. What
things should the head of a table know?
To read:
1. Elinor Aimes:
1935)
2.
Sophie Hadida:
1933)
Modern Etiuuette
(Walter <T. Black,
Manners for Millions
(Doubleday Doran,
98
9• KNOCKING KNEES#
How to consider the girl or hoy friend
To do:
1. List on the board the school functions you will attend 1
when you will want to have or be an escort.
2* Opposite the above list show whether the functions are
to be formal or informal and when corsages are proper.
3. Boys: List on the board any courtesies you should extend
to the girl’s parents when you call for her.
4. Girls: List on the board any courtesies you should ex­
tend to. your escort when he arrives at your home*
5. Discuss in class about having treats downtown after the
party and getting the girl home on time.
To decides
1. How should you ask for a date or accept a date?
2.
Why should a boy go inside the girl’s house when calling
for her and why should a girl not keep the boy waiting?
3. How should you behave on a date?
4. How can you show your appreciation of having a good time?
5* What can you do to be sure to make a good impression?
6'. Why
or why not have a treat after the party?
To read:
1.
Lucretia Hunter: The Girl Today. The Woman Tomorrow
(Allyn and Bacon, 19321
2.
Helen Halter:
Society in.Action
(Inor, 1936)
99
10. THE WELCOME MAT.
How to treat your guest
To do:
1. Relate to the class an instance when you have been a
guest and something occured which embarrassed you.
2.
Discuss what stepsshould be taken before any guest
arrives to provide for their enjoyment.
3. List on the board the most important items brought out
by the discussion.
4. Discuss ways of entertaining guests for the evening and
guests for the week-end.
To decide:
1. What can you do to assure the guest you are happy for
his or her company?
2. How much time alone or privacy should a week-end guest
have?
3. What can you do toentertain your guest for an evening?
4. What should you do or provide for the comfortof your
guest or guests?
5. How can you be sure you are not a bore?
6. When
should you repay a guest’s call?
To read:
1.
Beatrice Pierce: It’s More Fun When You Know the Rules
(Farrar and Rinehart, 1935)
2. W. 0.
Stevens:
The Correct Thing;
(Dodd-Mead, 1934)
10 0
11. COME AGAIN.
How to be a wanted guest
To do:
1. List on the board those things you should do and those
you shouldn’t do when you are someone’s guest.
2*
Discuss the above list and make a list of those qualities
which make a person wanted as a guest.
3. Relate to the class an instance when someone did some­
thing either commendable or not commendable.
4. Explain and demonstrate to the class what courtesies
should be shown by a guest upon arrival and departure.
To decide:
1. What attributes of good manners should be shown a guest?
2. How should you conduct yourself when you are a guest?
3. How much consideration should you give your host and
other guests?
4. Which is the best way to inform your host that you have to
leave early?
5. How can you express your appreciation of having a good
time?
6.
How long should an evening’s visit be?
To read:
1. ?/. 0. Stevens:
2.
The Correct Thing
Elizabeth Woodward:
(Dodd-Meed, 1934)
Personality Preferred
(Harpers, 1935)
101
12, RUNNING INTERFERENCE•
How to escort in public
To do:
1* Make a list on the board of the situations which place
definite demands on an escort in public?
£• Discuss in class the above list and explain how each
should be performed properly#
3* Demonstrate in class the correct way to properly escort
in public the/situations listed on the board#.
4* Relate an instance when proper escorting avoided embarrass
r r:mentt or avoided an accident.
To decide:
1. Why should men always walk on. the outside going along the
street?
£• How should an intersection be crossed by an escort?
3*
How should an-escort help in getting in and out of auto­
mobiles or street cars?
4. What is the correct procedure for an escort when attending
a show and finding seats?
5. How should an escort help in going through doors and when
sitting down to a table?
6# When
in public should an escort be held on to?
To read:
1. Helen Halter:
Society in Action
(Inor, 1936)
2. Broome and Adams: Conduct and Citizenship
Macmillan Co*, 19351
(The
CHAPTER
VIII
HOW TO BE SAFE AND NOT SORRY
This chapter concerns not only the prevention of
accidents in the home, but on the street, in public
buildings, in the school, and wherever recreation might
be sought by the pupil.
The prevention of accidents is
set up as the goal or standard but consideration and em­
phasis is also placed on what to do and how to do it in
case an accident does occur.
Training in what to do in
an emergency may be put to practical use at anytime under
varying circumstances.
It is the hope that this chapter will bring out and
impress upon the pupil that intelligent thinking is needed
at all times in all conditions, especially those in which
an emergency exists.
It has been proved that clouded think­
ing or panic has resulted in instances of disaster wherein
intelligent thinking and previous training would have greatly
altered a serious situation.
It is hoped that from the units
to be worked in this chapter that at least a small foundation
might be given and assimilated of practical use if ever
needed.
105
1. FOOLISH PRANKS.
How to prevent accidents about the school.
To do:
1. Relate to the class instances you have observed, which
resulted in an accident at school.
2. List on the board those places in which most accidents
occur at school.
3. Discuss in class the list on the board and why such places
are most frequently scenes of accidents.
4. Discuss in class what can be done to avoid accidents at
school and how such a program of safety can be enforced
at school.
5. Divide the class in committees to promote and carry out
a safety program at school.
To decide:
1. How can you promote .a safety at school?
2. In what ways are you affected by a poor safety record in
school?
3. How can you make the other pupils safety conscious?
4. Why should you be desirous, of having an accident-free
school?
5. What does safety at school mean to you?
6. Why is the community interested in safety at school?
7. What can you do to do your part in a school safety
program?
To read:
1*. Charles E. Dull:
and. Co. , 1938)
Safety First and Last
2* A Safety Program for High Schools
Casualty and Surety Underwriters}
(Henry Holt
(National Bureau of
104
2. LIVE WIRES.
How to prevent accidents at home
To do:
1. List on the board the most common accidents which occur
in the home.
2
.
Discuss this list on the board and explain what emergency
treatment should be given in each instance.
3. Discuss and list on the board what you can do to promote
safety in your home.
4. Invite a qualified person to explain and demonstrate
first aid in the home.
To decide:
1. What can you do to make your home free, from accidents'?
2. How can you learn how to administer proper first aid for
accidents in the home?
3* What can you do to make your brothers, sisters, and family
careful about accidents at home?
4. What can you do to help your neighbors and friends to be
free of anything which might result in an accident around
the house?
5. In home safety and prevention of accidents what part do
the following play; city water department; gas and
electric company; health department; city disposal plant;
and the street department?
To read;
1. Charles E. Dull;
and Co., 1938)
2. Walter Frank Cobb:
Century Co., 1937)
Safety First and Last
(Henry Holt
Everyday First Aid
(D. Appleton-
105
3. GASOLINE GOOFS.
How to drive a car safely
To do:
1. Invite a member of the highway patrol to discuss safe
driving and the laws set up to insure safe driving.
S. Discuss with your guest speaker how to secure a driverfs
license and the responsibility you assure in so doing.
3. Relate to the class the driver you do not like to ride
with and tell why.
4. Relate to the class an observation of safe driving which
impressed you.
p. List on the board good habits of safe driving which you
believe necessary.
To decide:
1. What responsibilities do you assume when you drive a car?
2. How can you make sure you are a safe driver?
3. What should you have cheeked on the car before you start
to drive?
4. How can you best be prepared to meet and overcome
emergencies encountered when driving.
5. What rights should you concede to other drivers?
6. Why is it wise not to drive a borrowed car?
To read:
1. Charles E. Dull:
1938)
Safety First and Last
2. J. R. Hamilton and Louis L Thurston:
(Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1937)
(Henry Holt and Co.,
Safe Driving
106
4. CHARRED BODIES.
How to prevent forest fires
To do ?
. .
*
'
1. List on the board, the causes of most fires in the home
and in the forests.
2. Tell the class what can be done to safeguard against
fires in the homes and forests.
3. Discuss in class what should be done before the fire
department arrives.
4. Invite the fire chief to explain how to safeguard against
fires at home and what to do in case one starts.
5. Explain to the.class how to report a forest fire and how
to extinguish your camp fire.
To decide:
1. How can you make sure your house is not a fire hazard4?
2. What should you do in case your house is on fire, after
calling the fire department?
,3. What type of fires should you not try to extinguish
.with water? Why?
4. How should you properly extinguish your camp fire?
5. How can you best aid your forest service in preventing
forest fires?
6., How do forest fires affect our present and future
generations?
7. How can you extinguish a fire on a person’s clothing?
To read:
1. William DuPuy:
1938)
2. Albright:
The Nation’s Eorest
-------------------
Oh Ranger
(The Macmillan Co.,
(Stanford University Press, 1928)
107
5. SKULL AM) CKOSSBONES.
How to prevent poisoning
To do:
1. Make a list of all the ways a person might get poisoned.
2. Discuss your list with the rest of the class and how you
would safeguard against each instance you have listed.
3. List on the board the best ways to prevent accidental
poisoning in the home and outside and how to safeguard
all concerned.
4. Invite your school physician to talk about poisons and
its prevention and antidotes.
To decide:
1. What can you do to safeguard your family against accidental
poisoning?
S. How do so many beenme careless in leaving poison around
the house or garage?
3. What should you do if you are aware someone has accident­
ly taken poison?
4.
What types of poisoning should you be careful of outside?
5. What is the difference between infection in a sore-and
poison?
6. What is home hygiene and how does it affect you?.
To read:
1. Walter Frank Cobb:
Century Co., 1937)
Everyday First Aid
2. Piener and Beauchamp:
(Scott, 1932)
(D. Appleton-
Everyday Problems in Science
108
6. A BREATH OF KgO.
How to prevent accidents by drowning
To do:
1. List on the board the main causes of drowning and how
each can be avoided*
2. Discuss in class' why a person should not enter the water
right after eating.
3. Relate to the class either a personal experience or
something observed that caused an accident in the water*
4. Demonstrate and explain to the class artificial respira­
tion.
To decide;
1. Why should you follow the rules of safe swimming and how
much should you insist on others doing the same?
£. How can you learn and pass the requirements for junior
and senior red cross life saving emblems?
3* Why are inflated innertubes and like devices dangerous
in the water?
4. Why and how should you test the depth of a pool or river
before diving in?
5. Beside the discomfort of sunburn why is it bad for the
system?
6. How can you get a good tan without burning?
7. What is the best thing to do when you are swimming and
get crmaps?
To read;
1. Walter Frank Cobb:
Century Co., 1937)
g# Amercian Red Cross:
Red Cross)
Everyday First Aid
Life Saving
(D. Appleton-
(Pamphlet by American
109
7.
EXIT.
How to prevent accidents in public buildings.
To doa
1. Discuss in class your city’s regulation and ordinances
in regards to the number of exits in a building, their
lighting, and what you should do in case a hurried
exit is necessary.
2. Visit a downtown building and record in your notebook
the safety devices and the use of each. Report to the
class your findings.
..
3. Invite a local insurance adjustor to discuss public
building safety and your help in preventing accidents.
4. Take notes on his talk and ask any question on points
you would like to understand more thoroughly.
To decide:
1. How can you help prevent accidents in a public building?
2. Why should you always acquaint yourself with the exits
when you first enter a theater or auditorium?
3. What is the best way to maintain order in ease of fire
or accident in a public building?
4. What in the way of accident prevention does the law
require public buildings to have?
5. What are the main causes of accidents in public buildings?
6. How can you secure training in public first aid and safety?
To read:
1. Thomas Dougherty:
Fire
(G. P. Putman’s Sons, 1931)
2. Powers, Neumer, Bruner: Man’s Control of His Environ­
ment (Ginn and Co., 19351
110
8. IT WASN’T LEADED*
of fire arms
How to prevent accidents from the use
To do s
1* Have available in class a rifle, shot gun, and revolver.
Have a qualified person (army officer, policeman) explain
and demonstrate the mechanical construction of each.
2. List on the board the correct way to check each gun to
make sure it is not loaded and copy in your notebook.
3. Discuss with your guest speaker the correct way to load,
handle, and carry each of the guns.
4. Have the guns passed around the class and have each
pupil demonstrate his understanding of them*
To decide:
1. What is the correct way to carry a rifle or revolver
when hunting in an open country?
2. How
long before a shot should the safety .be
3. Why
should youknow how to inspect a gun
correctly?
and
released?
handleit
4. What dangers are involved in firing a rifle, .a shot gun,
and a revolver?
5. How
can you besure a gun is not loaded?
6. How
old s ouldyou be to. properly handle
a gun?
7* In what situation or circumstance are many injured with
an unloaded gun?
To read:
1* William Frank Cobb:
Century Co., 1937)
2* 3*. H. Fitzgerald:
Everyday First Aid
Shooting
(D. Appleton-
(G. F. Book Co., 1930)
Ill
9* WHITS LINES*
How to be a good pedestrian
To do:
1. Explain and discuss the white lines or pedestrian
considerations (signals) used in your community.
2. Underline and read in class the state laws in your
highway regulations governing pedestrians and discuss
the advisability of each law.
3. Invite a state or city patrolman to discuss the rights
of pedestrians in town and in the country.
4 . Be prepared to ask questions at the end of your speaker’s
talk.
To decide:
1. How can you help safeguard your pedestrian rights and
the rights of others at crossings and on the highway.
2. How much right of way should you give the motorist?
3. How can you dress to protect yourself when walking at
night on the highway?
4. Why is it dangerous to ask for er thumb a ride?
5. What are safety zones and how should they be used by the
pedestrian?
6i Why should you be familiar with your state and city laws
governing pedestrians and motorists?
To read:
1. Charles E. Dull:
and Co., 1938)
Safety First and Last
2. J. R. Hamilton and Louis L. Thurstone,:
(-^oubleday, Doran and Co. , 1937)
(Henry Holt
Safe Driving
112
10.
LEVEL HEAD.
How to act in case of accidents.
To do:
1. Invite your school doctor or a person qualified to discuss
the reporting of accidents and emergency first aid.
2. List on the board and copy in your notebook the correct
procedure as given by your speaker in reporting accidents
and administering first aid.
3. Discuss in class how fire alarm boxes are distributed in
your community and how to identify them from a distance.
4. Demonstrate in class first aid bandaging, the placement
turnequets, and carrying, when necessary, an injured
person.
To decide:
1. What is the first thing to do when you are the first one
on the scene of an accident?
2. What pieces of wearing apparel can be used for bandages
in emergency first aid?
3. What should you do in waiting for help to arrive?
4. What places on the legs and arms can a turnequet be
applied?
5. Why should you not attempt to move an injured person
unless it is absolutely necessary?
6. How should an injured person be moved when it is neces­
sary to do so?
To read:
1. William Frank Cobb:
Century Co., 1937)
Everyday First Aid
2. American Red Cross:
Red Cross)
Injuries in the Home
(D. Appleton
(American
CHAPTER
IX
HOW TO MAINTAIN AND BUILD HEALTH
It has been the observation of this writer that
perhaps the most taken for granted asset youth has is
his health*
Not only taken for granted, as perhaps it
should be, but frequently it is unknowingly abused.
If
we .as teachers can in a small way stimulate the pupil to
an awareness of the rewards of proper care, then this
chapter will have succeeded in its original purpose.
The
units'are constructed around either health in school or more
generally those daily health habits in the home which should
be thoroughly and clearly understood by the adolescent boy
or girl.
Far too frequently in the rush of the day’s activ­
ities the pupil is apt to slight himself in some personal
habit.
It is through the pupil’s awareness of that which
is good or bad, right or wrong, healthful or unhealthful
-that he can maintain and sustain the fine mechanisms .of
the physical machine of which he is the controller and
operator.
114
1* HOT DOG.
How to prevent athlete’s foot
To clo:
1. Discuss and list on the board the causes of athlete’s
foot; cv ’
2. Opposite the list on the board list how to treat at
school and at home.
3. Discuss in class how the infection can spread to others
and how a person can reinfect himself.
4. Invite your school nurse or doctor to explain the nature
of athlete’s foot and its prevention.
To decides
1. How can you make sure you will not get athlete’s foot?
2. What can you do to prevent infection to others and rein­
fection in yourself?
3.
What causes athlete’s foot in some and not in others?
4. What safeguards should be taken in the home to prevent
the 'Spreading of athlete’s foot?
5. How can you help others in school prevent athlete’s foot?
6. When should a doctor be consulted about athlete’s foot?
To read:
1. Jean Broadhurst and Marion Serrigo:
(Silver, Burdett and Co., 1931)
Health Horizons
2. Ernest Steel and Ella White: Hygiene of Community.
School»and Home (Harper Brothers, 1932J
115
2* HOT AND COLD.
How to tune up the body with a bath
To do:
1. List on
the board in two columns the injurious affect of
too hot a bath and the injurious affects of too cold a
bath and explain each in class*
2. Discuss health in relation to bathing*
3. Discussthe advisability of always cooling the wat&r
after a hot bath*
4. Invite your chemistry teacher to discuss soaps and other
cleansing agents in regards to health and good skin
cond it ion.
To decide?
1* What is the best way to get the most from your bath to
meaintain good health?
2. What affect does hot water have on the pores of the
skin? What affeet does cold water have?
3. How can soaps and other cleansing agents have a bad
affect upon the skin?
4* How can you maintain a clear skin condition from bathing?
5* How can you impair your health by bathing?
6* Which is more advantageous to health, a tub or a shower?
To read:
1. Jean Broadhurst and Marion Lerrigo:
(Silver, Burdette and Co., 1931)
Health Horizons
2* Richard Kovacs:Nature» M. D. (D* Appleton-Century
Co., 1934)
116
3. FOUR OUT OF FIVE HAVE IT.
How to care for your teeth
To do:
1. Discuss and list on the board the procedure of proper
care of the teeth in regards to brushing and seeing your
dentist.
2. List on the board those foods having beneficial vitamins
for good teeth and gums.
3. Discuss and explain the use of the toothbrush, its size,
and the use of dental cream or powder, and dental floes#
4. Invite a dentist to discuss the formation and care of the
teeth.
To decide:
1. How should a tooth brush be
used to obtain the best results?
2. How important are the proper foods for good teeth and gums? *
3. How can you be sure
condition?
your teeth and gums are in good
4. What effect do poorly kept teeth have upon your general
physical condition?
5. How can sweets effect teeth?
6. Why do the army and navy have requirements of healthy
teeth for recruits?
To read:
1Z Carl W. Adams:
Co., 1932)
Your Teeth and Their Care
(The C. V. Mosby
2. Ernest Steel and •Ella White: Hygiene of Community School
and Home (Harper Brothers, 1932)
117
4*
HEALTHY,
W EALTHY,
AND
WISE.
How
to get the most from
your sleep
To do:
1* Discuss with the class the importance of beds, springs,
mattress, window location, and air circulation in regards
to proper sleep.
2. List on the board the benefits obtained from good sleep.
3. Tell the class why you think regularity of sleeping hours
should be maintained.
4. Discuss sleep in regards to number of hours, eating be­
fore retiring, and anything else which might be brought up.
To decide:
1. What can you do to get better sleep and rest?
2. How
do
3. Why
do
sleeping?
regular sleeping habits maintain goodhealth?
doctors inhist upon lots of fresh airwhen
4. What eventually takes place in the physical well-being
of a person who does not get enough sleep?
5. How
can sleep effect your school studies andgrades?
6. Why
do
older?
some claim a person needs less sleep as he grows
To read:
1. Richard Kovaes: . Nature, M._D.
1934)
(Appleton-Century Co.,
2. Ernest Steel and Ella White: Hygiene of Community.
School and Home (Harper Brothers, 1932T
118
5. EAT, DRINK, AND BE MERRY*
digestive system
How to care for your
To do:
1. List on the board the organs and their functions in the
digestive system.
2. Discuss how this system can be interrupted in its work
by improper food or care and the injurious effects that
can result.
5. List on the board those foods which are beneficial in
aiding the digestive system to function easily and
properly.
4. Invite your school nurse or doctor to discuss the care
of the digestive system.
To decide:
1. How can you regulate yourself to insure a trouble-free
digestive tract?
2. How are certain laxatives injurious to the digestive
tract and system in general?
3. How does peoper chewing of food and slow eating aid the
digestive system?
4. Why is excessive gum chewing harmful to the digestive
system?
5. What foods are an aid in keeping the digestive system in
good working condition?
6. How does irregular eating upset the digestive system?
To read:
1. James Clerk:
Picture of Health
2. Richard Kovacs:
1934)
Nature, M . D.
(The Macmillan Co., 1940)
(Appleton-Century Co.,
-
t
119
6* VITAMIHS CALL*
How to maintain a balanced diet
To do:
1. Liston tbe board the basic elements involved in nutri­
tion and what function each one has for physical well­
being.
2. Discusseach item
make up each one.
listed on the board and tell what foods
3. Discuss andlist on the board a well-balanced
day for the average pupil in high school.
menu for a
4. Invite your home economics teacher to discuss
and balancing the diet.
food values
To decide:
1. What is water considered more necessary to the health of
a person than solid food?
2. What nutritive food values are received from carbohydrates,
cellulose, fats, ^minerals, fals, protein?
3. How can you help your mother in planning her menus?
4. Why are vitamins call regulators?
5. Why is it important now to know how to plan or choose a
well-balanced meal?
6. How does too much candy upset a well-balanced diet and
eventually prove harmful?
To read:
1. Edith M. Barber:
1933)
What Shall I Eat
(The Macmillan Co.,
2. Gove Hambidge: Your Meals and Y^ur Money
Book Co., 1 934)---------------- ®-------
(McGraw-Hill
CHAPTER
X
HOW TO FIND YOUR PLACE IN THE WORLD
The concluding chapter of this course of study deals
primarily with the pupil’s problem of deciding which vo­
cational field he would like to enter.
A practical appli­
cation of job interviewing, soliciting, and job holding
is presented to create an awareness of what is to come and
the preparation necessary to successfully qualify.
The /
majority of pupils at this age are still, partially if not
totally, dependent upon their parents for the essentials
and non-essentials in their daily and school life.
It is
the intention of these units to give an overview of the
basic requirements of the work-a-day world and how they
can be applied.
By having a workable knowledge of the
life they are to enter eventually, it is desired that the
pupil be stimulated to develop more carefully those char­
acteristic traits and habits essential to the business
world*
121
!• BUSINESS ADDRESS.
How to choose a vocation
To do:
1. List on the hoard the vocations the class is interested
in. Discuss each one pointing out the average salary,
the demand, and place in the economic and social world*
2. In your notebook list all the facts you know about the job
1 ') you would like to have considering mainly the preparr. ation required, chances of advancement, hours of work
per day and week, and its place in the social and econ­
omic world*
3* Discuss with the class the educational preparation
necessary to qualify for the job.
4. See your vocational director and take the test concern­
ing the vocation in which you are interested and find
out if you are adept for the work you would like to do.
To decide:
1. How do you know you really want the vocation you have
chosen and how can you be sure it is not just wishful
thinking?
2. What course of study must you follow in high school for
preparation for your vocation?
3. How many years of schooling are necessary and where can
you receive the best college or specialized training?
4. What costs are involved in securing the proper preparation?
5. How
can you inform yourself about salary, hours of work,
and the demand of workers in your chosen field?
6. How
can you besure you will not change your desire of
a vocation before you enter college and if you do what
will you be able to do about it?
To read:
1. Cottier-Brecht:
2. J. M. Brewer:
Careers Ahead
Occupations
(Little Brown, 1935}
(Ginn and Co., 1936)
122
2. HEU? WANTED.
How to apply for a job
To do:
1. Bring to class letters of application and discuss how
they are constructed so as to provide all the information
the employer might want.
2. List on the board in outline form what you should say in
a letter of application.
3. Write a letter of application for a job you would like
to have and let the class comment on it.
4. Discuss and find out from a business man in town what
he likes to see in a letter of application and report
your findings to the class.
To decide:
1. How can you show your personality and educational know­
ledge in a letter or application?
2. How can you make sure your letter will receive the atten­
tion you want it to?
3. How should a letter of application be composed?
4. How should a letter of application be followed up?
5. What use should be made of the telephone, personal
friends, or parents in securing a job?
6. What can you do to prove your interest in a job and at
the same time not be a nuisance?
To read:
1. Elizabeth McGibbon:
Co., 1936)
2. ZuTavern, Bullock:
Manners in Business
Everyday Business
(The Macmillan
(Commercial, 1936)
123
3* THE i m m
DOOR.
How to use an interview
To do:
1. Discuss with the class things to he considered in your
personal appearancd when interviewing a person.
2. List on the hoard procedures for securing an interview
and the personal qualities: an employer generally looks
for during an interview.
3. iLrrange for an interview with some business man and relate
to the class the outcome of it.
4. Discuss with the class how time should he utilized in an
interview and what preparation, if any, you should do
beforehand.
To decide:
1. How can you make sure an interview will completely use
the time asked for and he interesting?
2. What preparation should you mhke before an interview?
3. How much talking or questioning should you do during an
interview?
4. How can you state your qualifications without appearing
egotistical or conceited?
5. How should you begin and end an interview?
6. How should you dress for and act during an interview?
To read:
1. Elizabeth Woodward:
1935)
Personality Preferred
2. Elizabeth MeG-ibbon:
Co., 1936)
Manners in Business
(Harpers,
(The Macmillan
124
4. ON YOUR MARKS*
How to get a job
To do:
1* Relate to the class how you got a job or how you think
a job should be -secured.
2. List on the board the procedures of job getting as
mentioned by members of the class. Discuss and copy
the best procedure in your notebook for future reference.
3. Invite some local business man who does extensive hiring
to discuss with the class the best way to get a job.
4. Interview business men downtown about people getting jobs
and the best way to approach or apply for a job.
To decide:
1. What kind of a job are you best fitted for or would you
like to do?
2. How can you wisely prepare yourself for your desired
job?
3. How should ypu apply for a job in regard to your approach,
dress, and personality?
4. What basic knowledge, if any, should you have for a job
you want and should you try for the job if you are not
properly equipped or trained?
5. How can you call upon your friends to aid you in getting
a job?
6. What qualities of your daily school record are excellent
references in getting a job?
To read:
1. Barrett:
2# Logie:
What About Jobs
(McClure, 1936)
Careers in the Making
(Harpers, 1931)
125
5. INSIDE DOPE*
How to learn about job vacancies
To do:
1. List on tbe board all the ways you can think of in learn­
ing about openings for work.
2. Discuss the above list and choose the three or four best
ways.
5. Bring to class newspapers and check through them for jobs
offered and locations of employment offices.
4. Visit any business concern which might have the type of
job you would like to have and find out if a vacancy
exists or when there will likely be one.
To decide:
1. Why is it better to make personal contacts in seeking s
job than visiting employment offices or reading the
papers?
2. What service can you perform if you locate an opening that
you can not fill or do not want?
3. How
canyou
learn about vacanciesfromoutsiders,your
friends, or from your school?
4. How
canyou
make certain good recommendationsby your
record in school?
5. Which business concerns in your town offer the type of
work you would like to do?
6. How can you show your interest in working for your chosen
employer without being a nuisance?
To read;
1. Barrett:
What About Jobs
2. ZuTavern, Bullock:
(McClure, 1935)
Everyday Business (Commercial, 1936)
126
6.
STEADY WORK.
How to hold a job
To do:
1. List on the board all of the desirable habits and qualities
common to most jobs.
2. Discuss this list on the board with the class and explain
how each desirable quality can be developed while you are
in school preparing for a job.
3. Relate an instance when someone has lost a job by failing
in one of the desirable qualities necessary for working
permanance.
4. Invite a manager of some local business firm to discuss
how to hold a job.
To decide:
1. What factors of personality and personal care are
necessary in holding a job?
2. What can you do to develop your personality and personal
habits?
3. What kind of attitude should you hold toward your co­
worker, your employer, and your job?
4. What sort of treatment should you 'expect 'from a^ .employer
in return for work done?
5. How can you best show your worth and desirability to get
ahead without encouraging personal favoritism?
6. How far should personal feelings and friendship be carried
to an employer?
To read:
5-. Barrett:
What About Jobs
2. Elizabeth Woodward:
1935)
(McClure, 1936)
Personality Preferred
(Harpers,
CHAPTER
XI
THE USE OF THIS COURSE OF STUDY
Throughout the entire course of study, it will be
noted that the writer has used a positive approach to all
of the problems.
This approach justifies itself in that
the leaders in both school life and the business world are
made up of those who know what to do and how to it rather
than what not to do and why it shouldn’t be done.
The
teacher must impress upon the pupil the desirability of
this attitude or approach in his working and solving the
problems presented.
It also should be stressed that
first,
the pupil must have a clear concept and understanding of
what he is doing.
Herein can the teacher lay the corner
stone of learning for understanding to be applied in the
pupil’s academic life as well as in his life outside.
The problems provided in these units of study for
the pupil are intended to furnish a practical and useful
foundation upon which he can develop a well-rounded per­
sonality.
This can be done only by letting the pupils work
out or solve their problems by calling upon their past ex­
periences and observations.
The teacher, however, can do
much for the pupil by tactful guidance and direction in
attaining the desired outcomes.
128
By keeping this course of study entirely functional
for the pupil, it has been experienced by the writer that
not only is it self-motivating but interest is maintained
at a high pitch by the pupil.
The working out of these
problems together by the pupils uses the class as a clear­
ing house for ideas, experiences, and observations, and
permits a choice to be made of only the best of the group*
The pupil realizes that he is not alone in what little
knowledge he holds of the problem.
Shyness is mutual*
Past embarrassments provide a common ground for learning
and understanding with his classmates.
As soon as the pupil
learns that others have been faced with the same problems
and have overcome them, his desire provides the proper
motivation for continuance.
Throughout the entire course of study, the teacher
should assume the attitude of being a definite part of the
class with the pupil and not the role of an outsider or
uninterested spectator.
By becoming a member of the class,
the teacher not only can aid and direct the pupils but can
gain a confidence and understanding from them which would
otherwise not exist*
Far too often is a teacher satisfied
to teach subject matter and not personalities.
To handle this course of study properly, the teacher
must become a definite part of the group in her charge and
develop from that group personalities which will be properly
129
equipped to meet the many problems of society in daily
life.
Through such guidance and direction a bond of common
understanding and /appreciation is created.
From such a
bond the pupil-teacher relationship goes much deeper in
mutual understanding of one another and creates a greater
respect.
The waiter has found from the application of these
problems that in the usual thirty minute period alloted that
it is necessary to eliminate any irrelevant discussion.
The class through planned and thoughtful handling can
accomplish a complete problem each day.
It is suggested
that the teacher be aware of the problems to be discussed
by the class from week to week.
By knowing in advance
what is coming, the teacher can appoint or have appointed
by the student chairman committees to contact and arrange
for the various outside speakers for their discussion in
advance of the problems to be studied.
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