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Utilization of standard attendance forms in the junior high schools of Los Angeles

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UTILIZATION OF STANDARD ATTENDANCE FORMS IN THE
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS OF LOS ANGELES
A Thesis
Presented to
the Faculty of the School of Education
The University of Southern California
In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
Master of Science in Education
by
Stanley Lawrence Taufman
June, 1942
UMI Number: EP54315
All rights reserved
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Dissertation Rublishiing
UMI EP54315
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T h is thesis, w r it t e n u n d e r the d ir e c t io n o f the
C h a ir m a n o f the c a n d id a te ’s G u id a n c e C o m m itte e
a n d a p p ro v e d by a l l m em bers o f the C o m m itte e , %
has been prese n te d to a n d accepted by the F a c u lt y
o f the S c h o o l o f E d u c a t io n o f T h e U n iv e r s it y o f
S o u th e rn C a l i f o r n i a in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f the
re q u ire m e n ts f o r the degree o f M a s t e r o f Science
in E d u c a tio n .
..........
Dean
Guidance Com m ittee
Irving R. Melho
C hairm an
Loui s P . Thorpe
1. 1. Wagner
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER
I.
PAGE
PRESENTATION OF THE PROBLEM . . . . . .............
1
Statement of the p r o b l e m ................ . . . .
1
Need for the study
1
• • • • ...........• • • • •
Approach to the p r o b l e m .............* ..........
2
Lamprey’s system of school records
3
. . .........
Recommendation of the National Education
A s s o c i a t i o n .....................
Summary
II,
............................... . . . .
8
HISTORICAL R E S U M E ..................................... 10
Contribution of professional
III.
4
societies
. . . . .
11
Contribution of individuals .....................
14
S u m m a r y .................................
17
THE P R O C E D U R E ......................................... 19
Purpose of the chapter
.......................... 19
Diversity of practices
....................19
t
An analysis of the s t u d y ................
20
S u m m a r y ............................................. 22
IV.
THE F I N D I N G S ................. .. .
Purpose of the chapter
............... 24
.......................... 24
Report of the s u r v e y .............................. 24
Enrolling the student ............................
24
Summary of Table 1.................................. 28
iii
CHAPTER
PAGE
Attendance of the student after lie
is inschool
.
29
Summary of Table I i .............................32
Regular attendance reports
Summary of Table III
.....................
32
............................ 34
Permits used within the school
............. 36
Summary of Table I V .........................
38
Permit to attend other junior highschools
38
Summary of Table V
...
. . .........................40
Permits for w o r k i n g .....................
41
Summary of Table V I ................................ 41
Reports for students sent to the probation of­
ficer or to special s c h o o l s ................ .
. 43
Summary for Table V I I .......................... 43
For students transferring away from this junior
high s c h o o l ................................... 45
Summary of Table V I I I ......................... .
Summary
V.
............
. 47
47
RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLU S I O N S .................. 50
Purpose of the c h a p t e r ........................ 50
Attendance record (Form 34-H-9A)................ 50
File bard
......................................... 51
Cumulative envelopes
............................
Permission to re-enter class (Form34-H-49)
Daily master absence sheet
...
.....................
51
53
54
CHAPTER
PAGE
Statistical work sheet
Hall pass
. . . . . . .
57
................................ 5S
Hall passes issued by the administration . . . .
59
Record blanks of teachers*
60
home visits . . . . .
Mechanical changes . . . .
Summary
.............................
. . . . .
61
63
B I B L I OGRAPHY............................................... 65
A P P E N D I C E S ..........
72
Appendix A ......................................... 73
Appendix B ............
130
LIST OF TABLES
TABLE
I.
PAGE
Report of the
Standard Forms Used in the Enrol­
ling of the
Student, Computed on a Percentage
B a s i s .................
II.
.
26
Report of the Standard Forms Used in Checking
the Attendance of the Student in the Schools,
Computed on a Percentage Basis.... ............
III.
Report of the Standard Forms Used in the Regular
Attendance Reports Reporting to
theCentral
Office Computed on a Percentage Basis .........
IV.
JO
Report of the Standard Forms
33
Used in the Permits
Within; the School, Computed on a Percentage
B a s i s ............................................. 35
V.
Report of the Standard Forms
Request to Attend a Junior
Used in the Permit
High School Other
than This Junior High School, Computed on a
Percentage Basis
V^.
..............................
39
Report of the Standard Forms Used in the Permits
for Working, Outside of School Hours, Computed
on a Percentage B a s i s .............. .......... 42
VII.
Report of the
Standard Forms Used in the Reports
for Students Sent to the Probation Officer or
to Special Schools, Computed on a Percentage
Basis .
.........................................44
vi
TABLE
VIII.
PAGE
Report of the Standard Forms Used in the Transfer
of Students from This School, Computed on a
Percentage Basis
............................. 46
CHAPTER I
PRESENTATION OF THE PROBLEM
Statement of the problem.
The particular purpose of
this study is to make an investigation of the standard rec­
ords, forms, and reports which are used in the attendance
offices of the twenty-nine junior high schools in the Los
Angeles City School District.
It is intended to include
first, a comparative study of the standard forms which are
used at present in the aforementioned schools together with
the technique and administration involved; and second, to
set up a procedure by which the standard attendance form may
be utilized in the junior high schools of Los Angeles in a
uniform manner in order to secure the best administrative
management and economy of time and energy in these schools.
This study will not concern itself with the separate forms
that different schools have evolved for their own use.
Heed for the study.
In the junior high schools of
Los Angeles there is one designated person that is responsi­
ble for the functions of the attendance office.
This person
is responsible for the use of the standard forms as sent out
by the Superintendents Office of the Los Angeles City
Schools.
At the present time, while the attendance forms
are standard there is a difference in the way this informa­
tion is kept in each school.
Records should be uniform in
2
all the Los Angeles junior high schools with respect to all
data which will he used for comparative purposes.
These
items should be recorded in similar places on similar forms.
The methods of collection and basis of calculations should
also be uniform.
At the present time when a new junior high
school is organized the standard attendance forms are sent
out from the business office but there are no instructions
sent out as to how to utilize these forms.
It is hoped that
a thesis of this type will help a registrar to do his work
more effectively.
Approach to the problem.
%
1
~
In order to become familiar
with the problem one must make a careful study of the general
and specific literature relating to this work.
Then set up
from the literature on the .subject, standards for high
school records and reports, to find the needs of the junior
high school, the principal and the teachers, and to find from
the literature on the subject and current practice an accepted
way of keeping the attendance records in the most efficient
manner.
In every school, many hours are spent in keeping the
school records and thus the problem of keeping the necessary
ones in a useable manner is most important.
It is well to give a brief history of some of the
studies that have made contributions in the field of high
school administration from the standpoint of records and
reports other than financial.
merits of past procedure.
From this can be judged the
Some of the excellent studies in
this field are: Lamprey’s system of records and reports;3the uniform system of records and reports of the National
Education Association Committee of 1912;2
Strayer-
Engelhardt’s system of records and reports;3
A. 0. Heck’s
dissertation on the subject;^* and W. L. Peterson’s study
which is an important contribution to the field.5 .These
studies will be described briefly':
Lamprey’s system of school records.
About 1909,
Charles M. Lamprey, director of the Boston Model School, de­
vised a complete system of school records.6
Mr. Lamprey says
**• ’’Elementary School Record Systems,” American School
Journal, September 10, 1910, p. 15.
2 National Education Association, Final Report of the
Committee on Uniform Records and Reports to the National
Council at the St. Louis Meeting (Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 1912Ti 51 pp.
3 George D. Strayer and N. L. Engelhardt, School Rec­
ords (School Record Series. Albany, New York: C. F. T#illiams
and Son, 1920).
^ Arch 0. Heck, ’’National Education Association and
Uniformity in Child Accounting,” Educational Research Bul­
letin of Ohio State University, N a 2, 4:23-29, January,' 1925.
3 W. Loyd Peterson, ’’High School Records,” American
School Board Journal, No. 1, 65:47-48, 144, July, 1922.
^ H. L. Engelhardt, et al, "Bibliography of School
Records and Reports,” Teacher’s College Record, 26:765-781,
May, 1925.
4
This work was done at the suggestion of §tratton D.
Brook, then City Superintendent of Schools at Boston,
* now president of the University of Missouri, when I was
first appointed Director of Boston Model School.
The
system sets forth a plan for a complete set of school
records and monthly reports to the superintendent.
It
was as nearly an original piece of work as anything of
the sort could be, and was done long before the National
Education Association received the mass of material sent
to that committee.
I should say that there was at the
time (when the National Education did its work) no com­
petent comprehensive system having any value.
The Boston public schools in 1910 adopted the system
recommended by Mr. Lamprey.
This plan made use of three
index cards and a loose-leaf record.
Discharge and Promotion card.
One was an Admission,
The second was on an 8 1/2n
by 11M sheet, and was called the Attendance and Scholarship
Record.
The third form was the office record.
This was a
4” by 6H card and contained much of the data as set forth in
card No. 1.
Recommendation of the National Education Association.
The National Education Association appointed a committee on
school records and reports.?
Mr. Lamprey was one of the five
persons appointed to act on this committee, which made an
investigation of the school records then in current use.
Several forms were selected and sent out to a great number of
city superintendents for criticism.
In these forms the chief
emphasis was laid on the cumulative record card which was
? Engelhardt, loc. cit.
framed to serve as a permanent and progressive record of the
pupil’s kindergarten and elementary school career.
The Lamprey study of 1909 and 1910 marked an epoch in
child accounting.
His record forms were so simple in arrang'
ment and the important items were so readily accessible that
the system made a great appeal to the common sense of the
school man.
Mr. Lamprey never had his forms copyrighted and as a
result, laany publishing houses today duplicate his forms.
From reading the more recent studies of Leonard P.
Ayers, Child Accounting in the Public Schools.^ A. 0. Heck’s
A Study of Child Accounting R e c o r d s . 9 and Moehlman’s "Child
Accounting,"3-0 the following principles and standards should
be kept in mind.
Since the state can be considered as a unit in the
study of records and reports, each state should organize a
state-wide child accounting system which should keep a per­
manent and continuous record of every child in the system.
& Leonard P. Ayers, Child Accounting in Public Schools
(Cleveland, Ohio: Survey Commission of Cleveland Foundation,
1915), Vol. I.
9 Arch 0. Heck, A Study of Child Accounting Records
(Ohio State University Studies.
Columbus, Ohio: Ohio State
University Press, 1925), Vol. II, Ho. 9.
Arthur. jB. Moehlman, "Child Accounting," Journal of
Educational Research. 9:293-304, April, 1924, and 9:415-423,
May, 1924.
6
Furthermore every state should carry on a school census at
regular intervals, for the school census is the foundation of
the system of records and reports for the state, county, and
city.
If public school records are to be meaningful, the
records must include not only children already in school,, but
should include every single child from birth to the end of
compulsory attendance age, whether such child is attending
any school or not.
If such school records were kept systematically and
accurately, they would show to the public the present and
future needs of the school or school system.
will represent actual conditions.
These records
The attendance records of
the past in many schools have led to much misinterpretation
of conditions as they actually exist.
These school records
should be kept in the simplest form possible, for this aids
in the accuracy and reliability of such records.
It is of
the highest importance that there should be accuracy in the
initial collection of facts about births, etc.
Wise administrators ask, what is the purpose of child
accounting?
Does it pay to spend many hours in keeping rec­
ords and reports?
Gould we get along in the running of the
school almost as well without these records and reports?
In
answering these questions it is well to give some of the
thoughts of the Department of Superintendence of the National
Education Association.H
The Association sets forth the following as the chief
functions of accounting in the schools:
1.
The facilitation of administrative
2.
The mechanizing of routines.
3.
Making possible
the
control.
measurement of the efficiency
of the schools.
4.
Making possible the prediction of future needs.
5.
Providing the means for comparisons with other
school systems.
6.
Making possible the development
of economies in
plant, in goods utilized, and in service employed.
After considering the thoughts as expressed by or­
ganizations and individuals in connection with this problem,
we must next concern ourselves with the junior high schools
of the Los
Angeles City School District.
theapproach to the problem it
In this step in
is well to investigate the
standard forms used in the attendance office.
In classify­
ing these various forms much diversity was found, both as to
forms on which items were kept, the nature of the items
deemed necessary, also the method of using these items.
The
standard forms for convenience may be divided into eight
-1-1 Heck, "National Education Association and Uniformity
in Child Accounting," Educational Research Bulletin of Ohio
State University. Mo. 2, 4:23-29, January, 1925.
8
different groups*
Some of the forms deal with, enrolling the
student into school.
A different group considers the at­
tendance of the student after he is in school.
A small
group takes in the monthly classification report.
of permits deals with the pupil within the school.
One set
Then a
different set of permits are designed for students outside
of each junior high school area.. Work permits are brought
together in a different section.
When problem children are
assigned to a corrective institution an additional form is
necessary for this information.
The final group of forms
are used in connection with a pupil that transfers from this
particular school.
In addition to studying various books, reports, and
standard forms, a visit to various junior high schools and
talking with the members of the attendance office of these
schools, will give one the current practices in keeping rec­
ords and reports in the junior high schools of Los Angeles.
The procedure adopted in this study has been largely
the library, interview, and questionnaire technique method.
Summary.
Difficulty is often encountered in utiliz­
ing the standard forms in the attendance offices of the
junior high schools of Los Angeles.
This study was an en-
deavor to find out from the literature on the subject, from
examples of current practice written up in educational
journals, together with a survey of the junior high schools
9
of Los Angeles, a simple but effective way of using the
standard forms.
The attendance department needs records of pupils for
the proper functioning of its department.
The principal
needs certain data for his reports to the superintendent’s
office.
Pupil accounting records are needed by the teacher
so that she may deal efficiently and effectively with all
children under her control.
CHAPTER II
HISTORICAL RESUME •
Early History,
The first record of schools in the
United States using standard attendance forms starts in Ohio
in 1837.
Samuel Lewis, in his First Annual Report of Common
Schools, states:
The teacher in every district should be required to
keep in a book to be prepared by the district, an ac­
curate record of the number of scholars, male and female
with the time they attend school.1
Massachusetts in 1837 prescribed a uniform school
register to be used throughout the state,^ and Horace Mann’s
Eighth Annual Report asked that a permanent school register
be kept.
1843.
The law pertaining thereto was passed March 18,
Connecticut in 1840 also passed a school law stating:
It shall be the duty of every teacher in any common
district to enter into a book or register to be provided
by the district clerk, the names of all the scholars at­
tending school, their ages, the date when they commenced
the length of time they continue, and their daily
attendance.3
During the first half of the nineteenth century each
^ Samuel Lewis, First Annual Report of the Superin­
tendent of Common Schools (Document 17, Thirty-sixth General
Assembly of the State of Ohio, 1837), pp. 19-20.
2 Arch 0. Heck, A Study of Child Accounting Records,
P. 27.
3 Ibid., p. 31.
11
state used attendance forms that seemed to meet their own
requirements.
This is brought to our attention by the or­
ganization in October, 1349, of The American Association of
Advancement of Education.
At its first two meetings the
question of school records and school statistics was given
considerable attention.
Horace Mann made an urgent plea for
uniformity and great credit is due him for taking this ini­
tial step.^
Very little was done until, in 1389, Superin­
tendent Greenwood of Kansas, Missouri, presented the report
of the Educational Committee of the National Council.
This
report was epochal in nature and opened a new field of sta­
tistics.
Questions were raised as to what data should be
collected, and suggestions were made for the gathering of in­
formation on such items as pupils* work habits, physical or
mental weakness, food and clothing, e t c . 5
Though this report
invited more interest on the subject than had ever been shown
before, the time did not seem ripe for concrete plans to be
formulated.
Contribution of professional societies.
It was not
until 1911 that large groups took a definite stand toward the
standardizing of pupil records.
^ Ibid. , p. 37
^ Ibid. , p. 63
The preliminary report of
12
the Committee on Uniform Hecords of the National Education
Association stated:
School statistics as at present compiled and compared
are unreliable and of little value, and they will con­
tinue to be so until agreement can be reached, not only
as to terms used and the definite meaning of these terms,
but also, to some extent, as to the method of recording
and arranging the original data upon which school sta­
tistics are based.6
The committee then outlined tentatively certain uni­
form fiscal and pupil records and reports including forms and
definition pertaining to attendance.
To this system it at­
tached the following values:
1. Universal adaptability for use in whatsoever system
of schools the pupil may enter.
2. Decreased costs because of printing in large quan­
tities.
3. Establishment of common practices of record making
and common terms for the expression of facts valuable
for statistical investigation.7
Up to 1916 the committee’s recommendations had not
been accepted, for at that time a writer in School and Society
urged a common recognition of certain basic identical items,
knowledge of which was essential to the efficient conduct of
any school system.
These, he pleaded, should be universally
recorded and reported upon, and in the ’’manner in which
L
£
0 Department of Superintendence, ’’Report of the Com­
mittee on Uniform Records and Reports,” Proceedings of the
National Educational Association (Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 1911), P- 115.
^ Jfrid. , p. 117.
13
expert opinion backed by superior common sense determines to
be the best."^
He added further that uniform records and
reports "have come to stay as a permanent part of our educa­
tional procedure. "9
In 1925, the National Association of Secondary School
Principals took over the study of the problem.
At this meet­
ing they appointed a committee to work on the problem of
standard record forms, with the primary object of arriving
at a recommendation of a standard permanent record form for
use in secondary schools.
In October, 1925, this committee
decided to have an analysis made of record forms.
At the 1926 meeting of the National Association of
Secondary School Principals, Troxel and Koos gave the results
of this analysis of 102 permanent record cards.
The most
important finding brought out the amazing diversity that
existed in the keeping of data for permanent records.
In 1927, B. Lamar Johnson combined the findings of the
committee with an analysis of the remaining 161 of the orig­
inal set of 263 blanks received, and his findings revealed
^ Earlin TJpdegraff,. "Uniform Records and Reports,"
School and Society. 3 :473-480, April 1, 1916.
9 Ibid. , p. 4&0.
^ Oliver Troxel and Leonard Koos, "An Analysis of High
School Forms," Tenth Yearbook of the National Association of
Secondary School Principals (Berwyn. Illinois: [n.P*3, 19237,
p. 33.
14
the fact that there was a lack of standardization in seconds
ary school records and r e p o r t s . H
Contribution of individuals.
In 1908-1909, Charles
M. Lamprey, director of Boston Model School, devised a com­
plete system of records.
One part dealt with attendance.
The attendance record was kept in a loose-leaf binding by
the teacher until the end of the school year, when it was •
filed with the principal.
Dr. J. L. Stenquist at the time he was director of
educational research of the Baltimore public schools proposed
what is known as the "Baltimore School Packet."
contains a series of 4M by 6" cards.
This system
One set summarized the
data of scholarship and attendance.
R. 0* Stoops, Superintendent of Schools at York,
Pennsylvania, has brought out some "Characteristics of an
acceptable local system of school records.”
1.
They should make for uniformity and comparability,
both as it concerns data from different sources within
the school system and as it concerns data collected in
other school systems.
There must be an agreement as to
the meaning of items on which information is collected,
and as to the procedure used in recording data.
Record
forms should always provide for the collection of cer­
tain minimal facts, such as those required by the state
and federal governments and such additional information
11 B. Lamar Johnson, "An Investigation of Permanent
Record Cards for Secondary Schools" (unpublished thesis for
the University of Minnesota, 1927), 117 PP.
15
as is desired locally for the whole school system.
2. The amount of data recorded should be no more than
is needed and will be used.
School procedure to be ef­
ficient must be based upon exact information.
Profes­
sionally trained teachers, principals and executive of­
ficers readily recognize the importance of adequate
records.
Such records facilitate wise administrative
control, make possible the measurement of efficiency of
school procedure and its improvement, make possible the
prediction of future needs, and generally furnish the
factual basis upon which school practice should be based.
On the other hand, duplication of effort in record keep­
ing should be eliminated whenever possible, so that the
clerical burden on teaehers, principals and their cleri­
cal assistants will be reduced to a minimum.
No item of
information should be collected which is not used. No
item should be recorded more than once unless such double
recording is essential.
The recording of information is
not an end in itself. Unless the information recorded
functions in pertinent research and better school prac­
tice its collection is wasted effort.
3. The various records of a school system should be
coordinated and unified.
The information collected in
one set of records should coordinate with and supplement
that recorded in other records.12
Harry S. Ganders and A. 0. Heck have brought out some
"Standards for Pupil Records."
i
Records should be uniform in all school districts with
respect to all data which are to be used for comparative
purposes.
These items should be defined identically and
should be recorded in similar places on similar forms
and should be recorded by equivalent administrative units.
Records should be uniform as to the various periods (day,
month, or year).
The methods of collection and bases of
calculations should also be uniform.
1^ R. C. Stoops, "Characteristics of an Acceptable
Local System of School Records," Research Bulletin of the
National Education Association, No. 5, 5:231-245, 1927.
16
The organization of record forms should tend to
simplify the process of recording and reporting. ^
Frederich 1. Emmons summarizes some information on
"Census and Attendance Records."
Adequate, attendance records are essential if compul­
sory attendance laws are rto he properly enforced.
The
term record is defined as a complete, accurate and con­
tinuing collection of data in sufficient detail to ren­
der available and usable at all times adequate knowledge
of the conditions involved in the attendance program.
If cities are to solve satisfactorily the problem of
regularity of attendance its policies must be governed by
the following standards of attainment:
1. That every child of compulsory school age should
attend school every day unless legally excused.
2. That the absence of every child for which the
school has no legal excuse should be investigated at
once.
3. That no child once enrolled in the schools, public
or non-public should be dropped from the school enroll­
ment without the full knowledge of the attendance depart­
ment.
4. That the record of the legal and illegal absences
of all pupils of all schools, public and non-public,
should be available.
5. That there shall be, at all times, constant, accu­
rate and complete accounting of all attendance service
offered by all agencies of the school authorities, or
outside agencies.14
Harry S. Ganders and A. 0. Heck, "Standards for
pupil Records," Research Bulletin of the National Education
Association. No. 5, 5:246, 1927#
14 Frederich 1. Emmons, "Census and Attendance Records,"
Research Bulletin of the National Education Association. No. 5,
5 262
: .
17
Walter E. Morgan, Assistant Superintendent of Public
Instruction of the California State Department of Education,
gives the "Prescribed Minimum Contents" that the secondary
school attendance records of the State of California must
contain.
All high schools and Junior high schools must record,
for apportionment purposes, the following data for each
pupil in attendance upon any regular day class other than
a Junior college class:
1. A daily record of actual periods of attendance or
absence, or of the per cent of absence from the 240minute attendance day,
2. A summary by school months (20 school days each),
of total days* attendance for apportionment purposes.
3. A summary for the sehool year of total days’ at­
tendance for apportionment purposes.15
Summary.
Teachers have been required to keep records
for many years, and most of these reeords have been those' of
attendance which were in the form of a register for the
schools.
Such items began to be standardized about 1837 and
1838, when Ohio and Massachusetts prescribed a uniform school
register to be used throughout the state.
Little more was
done with standardized forms of any kind then until 1889.
This was when Superintendent Greenwood of Kansas, Missouri,
presented his report which brought in other items besides
^ Walter 1. Morgan, "The Administration of Secondary
School Attendance," California State Department of Education.
September 21, 1939, p. 10.
attendance.
In 1911 definite progress was made on the attempt to
standardize records and reports.
Outstanding names in this
work are: Troxel, Koos, Johnson, Cook, Lamprey, Emmons,
Stoops, Ganders, and Heck.
Many administrators are laboring
in the endeavor to simplify and standardize the necessary
items for the pupil reports.
Walter E. Morgan in the
California State Bulletin of 1939 has prescribed some minimum
contents.
done.
Much progress has been made, but much needs to be
We can do a great deal in our own Los Angeles schools.
CHAPTER III
THE PROCEDURE
Purpose of the chapter.
It is the purpose of this
chapter to present the specific problems in connection with
the use of records and to devise ways and means of determin­
ing in so far as possible the attendance procedure practices
and uses of forms in connection with standard records and
report forms used in the Los Angeles City Schools.
Through
interviews and conferences, and by means of a questionnaire,
it has been possible to determine the answers to the problem.
Diversity of practices.
Confronted with the problem
of organizing the attendance office in a newly organized
junior high school in Los Angeles, the attendance teacher
made an effort to analyze the various procedures which could
be used as a guide in setting up his organization.
The wide
diversity of practice and procedures made it impossible for
him to use any one method which met the needs and requirements
of the office.
It therefore became necessary to analyze and
study many procedures and to select what seemed to be the
best practices to incorporate into a plan which would be sat­
isfactory and efficient.
Appendix A.
20
An analysis of the study.
An analysis of the problems
in connection with the attendance work in the Los Angeles
City School system shows first in importance the enrollment
of students.
According to the law of California the enroll­
ment of pupils is one of the items used as a basis for deter­
mining the funds allocated to the district by the state.
Its
importance is further recognized TAfcten one realizes the need
from an administrative viewpoint.
The attendance teacher
must have accurate and up-to-date information on every person
enrolled in school.
For these reasons the first item in the
questionnaire is concerned with the. forms used in connection
with the enrollment of students.
Second in importance has to do with the student’s at­
tendance after he has enrolled in the school.
This impor­
tance is likewise connected with allocation of state and
county funds, for it is upon the basis of average daily at­
tendance that funds are further allocated to the district.
Another reason for careful handling of this problem has to do
with factors involved in nonattendance.
Many problems grow­
ing out of the law compelling school attendance for the
pupils eight to eighteen confront the attendance teacher.
The neglect of this problem may involve many potential prob­
lems of delinquency, health, and unwholesome environment.
Forms for keeping accurate checkups on attendance are in­
cluded in this study as well as the use to which they are put.
21
The matter of keeping attendance of pupils is not
limited to the school alone.
A means of reporting this at­
tendance to a central office must be provided.
The forms
for this reporting were next considered in the study.
Since the school population in the junior high school
is very mobile, pupils moving as often as six times during a
day, it is necessary to keep an accurate check on every pupil
during every period of the school day.
It is further impor­
tant to be assured that he will remain in school all day.
Any exception to this must be carefully noted in the office
and a procedure for leaving school must be observed.
One
person, namely the attendance teacher, is the one responsible
for knowing where pupils are at all times and if absent, a
record of such absence must be in his hands.
All of the forms
used in connection with such pupil accounting were included
in the questionnaire set up for this study.
Another responsibility in connection with the attend­
ance office has to do with the issuance of work permits for
minors.
According to the law of California no pupil under
the age of eighteen is permitted to work full time or part
time after school hours or during vacation without a permit
which is provided by the Los Angeles Board of Education.
How these forms are used and who issues them is the next
problem in the study.
Many problems of unadjusted pupils confront the
22
attendance teacher.
One of these has to do with pupils who
are required to transfer to adjustment schools.
These trans­
fers also included in some instances a report to the proba­
tion officer for hearings in juvenile court.
The forms used
in this connection are quite detailed and require much time
and research to complete.
A study of the handling of these
forms was also included in the questionnaire.
The procedures followed in connection with leaving a
school by transfer was the last item considered in the ques­
tionnaire.
Since the city-wide pupil accounting depends on
the accuracy of these forms they are considered a very impor­
tant item in school administration.
Summary.
The questionnaire consisting of eight sec­
tions including enrolling students, attendance in the school,
reporting attendance to a central office, permits for trans­
fer and work, transfering to regular and adjustment schools,
was submitted to the twenty-nine junior high schools in the
Los
Angeles City School System.
Upon the basis of the find­
ing in the study recommendations for procedure in connection
with the attendance office were set up.
Setting up the questionnaire which would reveal the
practices and procedures used in connection with attendance
is the important contribution of this chapter.
The questionnaire was planned to investigate the use to
23
which each form was put, the person responsible for making
the report, the office in which the report was filed and
whether additional or substitute forms were used.
CHAPTER IT
THE EIMDINGS
Purpose of the chapter.
It is the purpose of this
chapter to tabulate the findings of the study, formulating
procedures in situations 'where a majority of the practices
seemed to indicate a uniformity of use.
Report of the survey.
An eight-page questionnaire,^
divided into eight sections, was sent to the twenty-nine
junior high schools of the Los Angeles City School System.
Replies were received from twenty schools, or 69 per cent of
the number to which the questionnaires were sent.
In every
instance the questionnaire was answered by the teacher in
charge of attendance so to that extent there is assurance of
uniformity of reporting.
Enrolling the student.
The first section of the
questionnaire has to do with the enrollment of pupils and
the analysis of the six forms provided by the central at­
tendance office for checking enrollment.
The importance of
correct checking of enrollment is recognized when it is
realized that certain state and county funds are allocated
to the district on the basis of enrollment.
1 Appendix A.
The first form,
25
Table I, cheeked in the questionnaire, was the one used to
register pupils, Registration Card Form 34-H.56,^ and any
substitute form provided by schools which for some reason or
other found the regular forms inadequate to meet their needs.
From the data of the above table it is evident that this
standard form is being used to a greater extent than are the
substitute forms, 72.3 per cent still using this form as
against 22.2 per cent using a substitute form.
The person
using this form most frequently is the registrar, the per­
centage of use being 33.3.
The greatest use
found in the office of the registrar, and it
of this form is
is used con­
stantly in 55*6 per cent of the schools.
The Program Card, form 34-R-11A ( B u f f ) , 3
the second
item on Table I, is used in 50 per cent of the schools studied
with only 11.1 per cent using a substitute form.
Here again
we find this card finds its greatest use, 55*6 per cent,..in
the registrar’s office.
cent of the schools.
It is used constantly in 44.4 per
The person most frequently responsible
for making the program card is the home room teacher.
The Program Card, Form 34-H-52 (White)4 is used in
2 Appendix A.
3 Appendix A.
^ Appendix A.
26
TABLE I
REPORT OF THE STANDARD FORMS USED IN THE ENROLLING OF THE STUDENT, COMPUTED ON A PERCENTAGE BASIS
Use
Responsibility
Check the one who is responsible
for its making
Time used
H
H
(l) Registration Card
Form 34-H-56
Substitute
11.1 33.3 22.2 11,1 11,1 27.8 11.1
5.6 11.1 5.6
5.6
5.6
55.6 11.1 16.7
16.7
5.6
(2) Program Card (Buff)
Form 34-H-11A
Substitute
11.1 11.1 16,7
16.7 27.8
5.6
5.6
44.4
11.1
5.6
44.4
11.1
22.2
- 5.6 11.1 11.1 16.7 11.1
5.6 5.6
5.6
27.8
(4) Program Card
Form 34-H-40
Substitute
(5) Change of Program
Form 34-H-40
Substitute
22.2
5.6
11.1 16.7 5.6
11.1
16.7 55.6
11.1
(6) Registration Record
Form 34-H-106 '
Substitute
11.1
5.6
27.8
5.6
33.3 5.6 33.3
5.6
11.1
11.1
(7) Program Card
Form 34-H-2
5.6
5.6
11.1
5.6
(0
H
a
+5
flj
•H
0
■P
0
5
Ph
16.7 5.616.7 5.6
5.6
Additional and
substitute forms
Office in which used
Enrolling the student
(3) Program Card (White)
Form 34-H-52
Substitute
Forms
c
•H
U
11.1
•H
0
C
•H
U
ft
0
0
•rl
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(0
0)
U
u
0
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<D
w
§
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0 H
O
H<
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0
n
• <0
m
o
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H
o f
t
■p
w
®
61.1
16.7
5.6
1:2 72.3
1. 22.2
11.1 5.6 11.1 55.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
1:2 50.
1. 11.1
27.8 33.3 27.8 16.7 11.1
-16.7
16.711.1 5.6 5.6 5.6
5.6
11.1 5.6 27.8 11.1
5.6 5.6 5.6 5.6
5.6 11.1 5.6
11.1
11.1 22.2 16.7
5.6
22.2 5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
(9) Program Card
Fora 34-H-12
5.6
5.6
5.6
X
2:5 66.6
2
11.1
X
1. 44.6
5. 11.1
X
1:2 72.2
2. 5.6 X
27.8
5.6
1 . 22.2
1 . 5.6 X
5.6
(8) Program Card
Fora 34-H-ll
X
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6 5.6
Additional substitute forms used
(l) Signature Blank
!5.6
11.1 5.6
11.1'
5.6
5.6 5.6
1. 16.7
(2) Request for Transcript
5.6 5.6 5.6
5.6
(3) Student Enrollment Card
5.6
5.6
5.6
(4) Address Card
5.6
5.6
5.6
(5) File Card
5.6
(6) Home Room Assignment
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
1.
5.6
1.
5.6
5.6
5.6
NOTE: This table should be read as follows: Registration Card— Form 34-H-56 is made by the counselor in 11.1 per' cent-instances, by the.registrar_ in 33.3 per cent
instances, by the attendance clerk in 22.2 per cent instances, and so on. This form was used constantly by 55.6 per cent of the schools reporting 16.7 per cent
instances and by 11,1 per cent instances as the beginning of the semester, This form was filed in the principal's office 11.1 per cent of the times, 61.1 per cent
in the registrar's office, and 5.6 per cent in the home room. From 1 to 2 copies were made. 72.3 per cent of the schools reporting are still using this form.
27
66.6 per cent of the schools tabulated, while substitute
forms are used in 11.1 per cent of the schools.
The counse­
lor was checked most frequently, 27.8 per cent, as the person
responsible Tor its making.
Like the buff card, it is used
constantly in 44-4 per cent of the schools.
Program Card (Change of Program), Form 34-H-40,5 is
used in 44.6 per cent of the schools while substitute forms
are used in 11.2 per cent.
Unlike the two above-mentioned
cards, which are found to be very useful, it is used con­
stantly in only 16.7 per cent of all the schools checked.
Two reasons for this may be found in the fact that many pro­
grams are set up in patterns which cannot be changed, for
example B7 programs.
Few changes in programs may indicate
also good guidance and careful planning preceding the making
of pupils* programs.
The counselor uses it 22.2 per cent,
which is more frequently than any other person.
Change of Program Card, Form 34-H-40, is used in 72.2
per cent of the cases studied, this being equal in use to the
registration card.
For the first time we find the vice­
principal drawn into the picture of enrollment.
In the in­
stance of a change of program the matter of guidance is a
factor which demands a close personal relationship.
This
form. is. checked in 33.3 per cent of the cases when needed.
5 Appendix A.
28
Registration Record Form 34-H-106^ is apparently of
little use, since only 22.2 per cent report it still in use.
Here the attendance clerk receives the Highest percentage of
responsibility, 27.8 per cent.
The last three cards, program cards, Forms 34-H-ll and
12 are used so infrequently that they indicate a need for fur­
ther study pending discontinuance.
is the extent of use.
In each case 5.6 per cent
The six substitute forms on Table I,
second section, are used so infrequently that they do not
seem to affect the general program of enrolling students.
However when a school finds a need for a substitute form
which is not provided by the Board of Education it is recom­
mended that these forms be investigated to determine their
value with the possibility of their being made available to
the entire system.
Many of the present valuable forms were
evolved and have been developed in this way.
Summary of Table 1.
It is evident from the tabulation
that standard forms are being used to a greater extent than
are the substitute forms.
It is further evident that in some
way the standard forms are inadquate
to meet the needs of a
small group of schools for which they are set up.
As evi­
dence of this there are fifteen substitute forms in use, not
Appendix A.
one of which has a greater use than the others.
sistently
But con­
throughout the tabulation the need is constant.
In enrolling students it will be noted more forms are used
by the counselor than by any other one person.
More pupils
are enrolled by the registrar than by any other one person.
The standard forms which are most frequently used are number
one on the chart which has to do with registration and num­
ber five which has to do with change of program.
Humber
three follows next in use and number six has the least use
of all the enrollment forms evaluated.
Among the substitute
forms having the greatest use is a signature blank having
16.7 per cent.
It will be noted that in not one instance is the prin­
cipal involved in enrolling students, and the vice-principal
in only one instance where changes of programs are being
made.
Attendance of the student after he is in school.
Table II takes up the problem~bf attendance in the school.
Ten standard forms were evaluated in terms of persons respon­
sible for the making; the use to which the form was put; the
office in which it was filed, and the substitute or addi­
tional forms used.
Attendance, like enrollment, must be kept accurately,
for it is on the basis of average daily attendance that funds
are allocated from the state and county to the local districts*
30
TABLE II
REPORT OF THE STANDARD FORMS USED IN CHECKING THE ATTENDANCE OF THE STUDENT IN THE SCHOOLS, COMPUTED ON A PERCENTAGE BASIS
Responsibility
Forms
Use
Check the one who is responsible for its making
Additional and
substitute forms
Office in which used
Time used
Attendance
(1) Attendance Record
Form 34-H-9A
Substitute
22.2 66.7
(2) Re-entrance Card
Form 34—H—49
Substitute
5.6
5.6 27.8
(3) Absence Notice
Form 412
Substitute
(4) Request for Investigation
Form 34-EH-5
(9) Dental App't. Service
Form 33.66
(10) Exemption from School
Attendance
Form 34-EH-21
(U) Absence Notice
Form 34-H-37
16.7
22.2
11.1 33.3
50.
5.6
5.6
22.2 16.7 5.6 11.1
11.1
2 7 .8 2 2 .2
5.6 5.6 44.4
16.7
11.111.1
5.6
(12) Notice of Pupil Return
Substitute
5.6
50.
5.6
3 44.4
5.6
x
94.4
4100
x
11.1
11.1
5.6
16.7 22.2 16.7
27.8
55.6
11.1
5.6
11.1 5.6 27.8
27.8
16.7 16.7 27.8
5.6 16.7 5.6 4 U
22.2 5.6
38.9 33.3 16.7
x
44.4
11.1
5.6
11.1 11.1 5.6
5.6
5.6
11.1
5.6
5.6
5.6
50.
5.6 72.2
5.6
5.6
(13) Card Used vihen Pupil
Returns without Note
5.6 5.6
5.6
(14) Attendance Certificate
5.6
44.4
11.1 11.1
61.2
38.9
11.1 11.1
66.7
5.6
5.6
x
x
77.8
x
5.6
X
5.6
X
5.6
5.6
X
5.6
5.6
X
88.9
5.6
5.6
x
22.2
11.1
5.6
5.6 27.8 5.6
22.2
5.6
83.3
5.6
5.6
11.1
38.9 22.2
5.6
5.6
5.6 5.6
5.6
5.6 5.6
5.6
83.3
5.6
11.1
16.7
5.6 5.6 5.6 6l.l 44.4 11.1 5.6
(6) Attendance Notice to Parents
Form 32-EH-16
Substitute
(8) Dental App't. Service
Form 33.64
83.3
5.6
11.1 5.6
5.6 5.6
5.6
(5) Notice of Absence
Form 32.69
Substitute
(7) Request for Home Visit
Form 33.127
Substitute
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
NOTE: This table should be read as follows: Attendance Records, Form 34-H-9A, is made by the registrar 22.2 per cent times, by the attendance clerk 66.7 per cent
of the time, by the homeroom teacher 5.6 per cent of the time. It is used constantly 83.3 per cent of the timej it is filed in the registrar's office 83.3 per cent of the
time, and the number of copies made is one. The form is still used in 83.3 per cent of the schools and the substitute forms are used some of the times.
31
So important are these figures that the administrator, respon­
sible for the record, must swear annually to their accuracy*
For this reason it is. in keeping with good administration
that the handling of this record be made as simple as pos­
sible while still maintaining all of the essentials.
Table II is made in two sections which include the
examination of fourteen forms*
This table shows, in contrast
to the previous table on enrollment, a greater consistency in
the use of regular forms provided by the central attendance
office*
In only three instances were substitute forms used
to take care of attendance.
Five additional forms were re­
ported, none of which is used extensively.
The report, Num­
ber four, Request for Investigation, (Form 34--SH-5)*7 which
shows 100 per cent usage, is one which has been very recently
revised.
Number one, Attendance Record, (Form 34-H-9a),& and
Number ten, Exemption from School Attendance, (Form 34-EH-21),9
on the table, receive the next highest percentage of use.
Number one also receives the highest percentage of constant
use.
This is the regular monthly form required by the Board
of Education.
It will be noted from Table II the degree to
which the registrar’s office is responsible for filing these
7 Appendix A.
Appendix A.
g
7 Appendix A.
32
reports.
All regular forms are filed there except the re­
entrance card and this is filed in one instance in the home
room.
The few responses to Requests for Home Visits (Form
33-1 2 7 seems to indicate that few visits are made to the
home s.
Summary of Table II.
Since the keeping of the attend­
ance reeords is set up quite specifically by the central of­
fice there is little opportunity to deviate from the regular
form.
This entire group of forms is used more consistently
and filed more regularly than any of the other forms studied.
Regular attendance reports.
The next section of re ­
ports is concerned with reporting attendance to the central
office.
Table III shows the evaluation of eight forms used
for this purpose.
Here we find very consistent practice due
to the demands of the central office and those set up by the
state and county offices.
The only exception to this is form
number one, Class Enrollment Blank (Form 34-H-42),H used as
a device within the school to compile information for the
central office.
of 27.8 per cent.
Here a substitute form is used to the extent
Form number three, Statistical Report (Form
5 1 . 5 is used in 100 per cent of, the cases studied.
10 Appendix A.
^
Appendix A.
Appendix A.
It is
33
TABLE III
REPORT OF THE STANDARD FORMS USED IN THE REGULAR ATTENDANCE REPORTS REPORTING TO THE CENTRAL OFFICE COMPUTED ON A PERCENTAGE BASIS
Use
Responsibility
Check the one who is responsible
for its making
Time used
Forms
Additional and
Substitute forms
Office in which used
B
©
0
4
)
Regular attendance reports
(l) Class Enrollment Blank
Form 34-H-42
Substitute
(2) Classification Report
Form 51.2
£5
16,7
5.6
5.6
5.6 38.9 77.8
77.8 72.2
(4) Eight Months' Proof Sheet
Form 51.13
44.4 72.2
(5) Duplicate Attendance Record
for Nonresidents (7th and
8th grade)
Form H-51.10
38.9 72.2
(6) Report of Nonresident Pupils
Form 43.13(Elementary)
27.8 50.
(8) Homeroom Teacher's Monthly
Register
(D
« 5 C
0
fi
C rl t
(3) Statistical Report
Form 51.5
(7) Report of Nonresident Pupils
Form 43.13 (Junior and High)
■
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0
)
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o
o
to
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crt
0.
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trt
ft
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ft
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43
ft
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61.1
1:2 27.8
x
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© t)
IS
rl
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B
E
0
50. 5.6
5.6 16.7
27.8 5.6 27.8
5.6 11.1 11.1
11.1 11.1 22.2 5.6
5.6
38.9 5.6 50.
16.7
72.2 5.6 33.3 27.8
33.3 11.1 55.6
16.7
88.8
50.
2:3 100.
5.6 66.7
11.1
66.7
44.4
1:3 94.4 x
11.1 11.1 72.2
5.6
61.1
33.3 5.6 16.7
1:3 94.4 x
5.6
11.1 11.1 50.
5.6
50.
5.6
5.6
11.1 16.7 72.2
5.6
77.8
5.6 5.6 38.9
5.6
5.6
5.6 33.3 61.1
5.6
22.2
5.6
22.2
5.6 44.4 5.6
5.6
3:4 94.4
44.4
x
1:2 77.8 x
1:3 100.
1
x
5.6 x
NOTE: This table should be read as follows: Class Enrollment Blank, Form 34-H-42, is made by the counselor 16.7 per cent of the time, by the grade
counselor 5.6 per cent of the time, by the classroom teacher 50 per cent of the time, by the secretary 5.6 per cent of the time; is used constantly 27.8 per
cent, and is seldom used 5.6 per cent of the time, when needed 27.8 per cent; is filed in the principal's office 22.2 per cent of the time, in the vice
principal's office 5.6 per cent of the time, in the counselor's office 44.4 per cent of the time, in the registrar's office 5.6 per cent of the time;
number of copies made is one and the form is still used in 61,1 per cent of the schools, and the substitute form is used in the schools some of the time.
34
a form required by the central office and sent in monthly.
Form number five, Duplicate Attendance Record for NonResidents (Form 51.10),^^ is likewise required by the office
for reporting nonresident pupils.
Two questions arise in
connection with form number two, Classification Report (Form
5 1 .2 ),14 and number four, Fight Months Proof Sheet
(Form
51«13),1^ both of which are required but reported as used in
94*5 per cent of the cases.
Is this an oversight in reporting on the questionnaire,
or is someone remiss in his responsibility?
Summary of Table III.
The procedure of reporting to
the central office is consistently uniform, the forms used be­
ing set up by the central office.
In most instances the forms
are adequate for this reporting, having been developed over a
period of years as the needs required.
There is much incon­
sistency, however, in the making and in the filing of these
reports.
Again the registrar*s office is used most frequently
for filing, and the registrar assumes the greatest responsi­
bility for making the report.
The only exception to this is
in the case of form number one in the table.
In this instance
the teachers registered the highest in making out the form.
Appendix A.
Appendix A.
Appendix A.
35
TABLE I?
REPORT OF THE STANDARD FORMS USED IN THE PERMITS WITHIN THE SCHOOL, COMPUTED ON A PERCENTAGE BASIS
Responsibility
Use
Check the one who is responsible for its making
Forms
Time used
Office in which used
50. 16.7
16.7 16.7
55.6
27.8
Additional and
substitude forms
Permits used within
the school
(l) Excuse to go Home
Form 34-H-43
Substitute
27.8 33.3
38.9 22.2 5.6 5.6 5.6
5.6
5.6 27.8 5.6
(2) Office Excuse
Form 34-H-45
Substitute
50. 50 . 44.4 61.1 50. 5.6
11.111.1 5.616.711.1
11.1
5.6
(3) Office Summons
Form 34-H-46
Substitute
55.6 61,1 55.6 66.7 55.6 5.6
16.7 16.7 16.7 16.7 16.7
(4) Permit
Form 34-H-47
Substitute
5.6 5.6
5.6
1:2 66.7
1:2 33.3
5.6
55.6 11.1 16.7 16.7 16.7 38.9
11.1 5.6
5.6
16.7
1:2 66.7
1:2 16.7
11.1
5.6
11.1 16.7 16.7
16.7 11.1
55.6 16.7 22.2 22.2 22.2 27.8
5.6 11.1 5.6
16.7
16.7
1
72.2
1:2 16.7
50 . 44.4 11.1 61.1 33.3 5.6 5.6 5.6
5.6
5.6 5.6 5.6
55.6 22.2
5.6 5.6
5.6 11.1 5.6 66.7
5.6
1:2
1
77.8
11.1
(5) Permit to Leave Room
Form 34-H-48
Substitute
.i- ,.
5.6 5.6
11.1 22.2
5.6
22.2 22.2
16.7
11.2
16.7
22.2 11.1
1:2 44.4
1
16.7
(6) Tardy Excused
Form 34-H-50
Substitute
5.6 38.9 27.8 5.6 5.6 11.1
11.1
5.6 5.6 5.6 5.6
5.6 11.1
22.2 27.8
11.1
27.8
16.7
n.i
1:3
1
50.
11.1
(7) Tardy Not Excused
Form 34-H-60
Substitute
5.6 33.3 27.8 5.6
5.6 5.6 5.6
5.6
5.6 27.8 11.1
11.1 5.611.1
44.4 16.7
11.1 16.7
16.7
33.3
11.1 5.6 11.1
1:3
1
61.1
27.8
11.1
1
11.1
5.6 5.6
11.1
(8) Library
Substitute
(9) Traffic Workers
(10) Hospital or Rest Excuse
11.1
5.6
5.6 5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
11.1
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
1:0
NOTE: This table should be read as follows: Excuse to go Home, Form 34-H-43j is made by the principal 27.8 per cent of the time, by the vice principal 33.3 per cent
of the time, by the registrar 38.9 per cent of the time, by the attendance clerk 22.2 per cent of the time, by the attendance supervisor 5.6 per cent of the time, by the
pupil 5.6 per cent of the time, by the grade counselor 5.6 per cent of the time, by the doctor 5.6 per cent of the time, by the nurse 5.6 per cent of the tire; is used
constantly 50 per cent, when needed 16,7 per cent; is filed in registrar's office 55.6 per cent of the time; number of copies made are 1:2, and the form is still used in
66.7 per cent of the schools.
5.6
36
Permits used within the school.
In the fourth section
of the questionnaire, which has to do with standard forms used
within the school, the individuality of the school becomes
evident.
Greater flexibility of procedure characterizes the
reporting as the needs and conditions of each individual
school require*
Table IV is a tabulation of the results of
the ten forms used.
Here are found a variety of substitute
forms, one in fact for each regular form and three forms used
in addition.
A greater spread in the responsibility of those
making the forms is evident and likewise the number of places
where each report is filed.
For example, every one of the
fourteen positions named in the chart are checked as having a
responsibility for their making, the greatest responsibility
being that of the registrar for excusing children to go home.
The principal is next in line.
This presents a question of
conformity to Board of Education ruling.
Ho one is permitted
to be excused to go home, Excuse To Go Home (Form 34-H-43) ,
without permission of the principal or vice principal, the
percentage of responsibility for each is 27*8 and 33.3 per
cent respectively.
In 22.2 per cent of the cases the attend­
ance clerk is responsible.
This reveals a serious situation
which should receive further study*
Appendix A.
Since only two thirds of
37
the schools use this form while one third use a
substitute
form further study should be given to determine the reason.
Humber two, Office Excuse (Form 34-H-45)>^7 and three, Office
Summons (Form 34-H-46)
show quite similar tabulations, both
showing a wide variety of makers and others using substitute
forms to the extent of 16.7 per cent.
The first five posi­
tions mentioned in the tabulation receive the greatest respon­
sibility and quite consistent in distribution except for the
registrar, who rates the highest.
Number four, Permit (Form 34-H- 47),^
seems quite satis
factory, only one school reporting a substitution.
Every po­
sition except that of the home room teachers makes out the
form.
Number five, Permit to Leave Soom (Form 34-H-4B),^^ is
the least used of the forms tabulated in Table IV.
One in*
ference may be drawn from this'situation.
Since only 44.4
per cent use the form and only 16.7 P©r cent substitute for
it, there is a possibility that leaving the room is an in­
formal procedure which does not require checking.
Until
pupils have reached a high peak of self-government it is very
**■7 Appendix A.
Appendix A.
19
7 Appendix A.
20 Appendix A.
3S
important to know where every pupil is at every moment in
the day*
Numbers six, Tardy Excused (Form 34-H-59),21 and
seven, Tardy not Excused (Form 34-H-60),22 have to do with
tardiness excused and not excused.
Unexcused tardiness, num­
ber seven, is used in 61.1 per cent of the cases.
tute form is used in 27*8 per cent.
A substi­
Eighty-eight and nine
tenths of the schools use a form for tardiness.
This gives
rise to the question of whether all schools cheek on
tardiness.
Summary of Table IF.
The individuality of the school
is evident in this tabulation.
for all regular forms.
Substitute forms are used
There is little consistency in the
making or the filing of these reports.
Further investigation
in the matter of excuses to go home is recommended, also the
extent to which pupils may leave the room without some means
for checking their whereabouts..
Further study of disregard
for tardiness is recommended.
Permit to attend other junior high schools.
In Table
F are found the tabulation of two regular forms, one of which
has a substitute form and two additional forms.
Appendix A.
22 Appendix A.
Form number
39
TABLE V
REPORT OF THE STANDARD FORMS USED IN THE PERMIT REQUEST TO ATTEND A JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL OTHER
THAN THIS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL, COMPUTED ON A PERCENTAGE BASIS
Re sp on sibility
Use
Check the one who is responsible
for its making
Time used
Forms
Office in which used
©
T3
o
00
*
H
Permit request to attend
a junior high school
other than this junior
high school
H
$
•8*
o
c:
•H
u
.§•
o
•5
ft
<D
O
©
d
©
©
O
U
g
W
•hHO
-P
©
o
c
©
43
4-3
ft
61.1
5.6 22.2 27.8
(2) Request for Permit
Form 43-6
Substitute
5.6
5.6
(3) Request for Permit made
by Principal of the
District
Substitute
5.6
5.6
(1) Permit Notice
Form 34-AEH-l
(4) Yearly Permit in Letter
Form
Substitute
o
c
rt
'cS
©
-p
5.6
•rl
©
X}
m
d
©
&
43
2
O
©
CO
5.6
©
43
1
43
©
ci
0
0
©
a
0
d
H
©
CO
©
X)
d
33.3 11.1 50.
5.6
5.6
©
©
"d
CO
<u
ft
©
©
ft
r—1
Additional and
substitute forms
a
•H
O
.9
d
ft
d
©
-p
■p d
©
d *h
ctJ d
43
4
ro
W^ ©
ft d©
•rl d
O
*d) W ©
©
©
©
g
-p
«
<3$
&
Cti
11.1 77.8 22.2
5.6
5.6
5.6
5.6
©
T©J
©
d
g
o
rH
rH
©
■8
4
3
•H
4W3
•H
g
2; 3
5.6
5.6
O
d
CO
5.6
5.6
ft
O
o
O
ft
■
§
CO
94.4
x
5.6
5.6
5.6
x
5.6
x
NOTE: This table should be read as follows: Permit Notice Form 34-AEH-l is made by the principal 6l.l per cent of the time,
by the vice principal 5.6 per cent of the time, by the registrar 22.2 per cent of the time, by the attendance clerk 27.8 per cent
of the time, by the attendance supervisor 5.6 per cent of the time, by the secretary 5.6 per cent of the time; it is used constantly
33.3 per cent of the time, and is seldom used 11.1 per cent, when needed 50 per cent of the time; is filed in the principals office
11.1 per cent of the time, in the registrar’s office 77.8 per cent of the time, and in the assistant superintendent’s office 22.2 per
cent of the time; number of copies made are 2:3> and the form still used is 94*4 per cent in the schools, and the substitute forms
are used some of the time.
40
one, Permit Notice (Form 34-AEH-l),^3 is used in 94-4
cent of the schools.
the needs.
It is a required form and seems to meet
Why this response is not 100 per cent gives rise
to the question of why one school has failed to respond.
Is
it possible that one school never gives permits to pupils to
attend other schools, or is it an oversight in responding to
the question?
The principal being the only one authorized
to give such permits is responsible in 61.1 per cent of the
cases, the attendance clerk in 27.8 per cent of the cases.
Here it is necessary to distinguish between making and sign­
ing, the authorization depending on the signature.
The
registrarTs office files it in 77.8 per cent of all cases.
Form number two, Bequest for Permit (Form 43.6 ),^4 is
used in only 5.6 per cent of the eases and the same about for
a substitute form.
Its discontinuance should be considered.
The two additional forms noted in forms three and four are
used to such a small extent their disuse could also be
considered.
Summary of Table V.
The form set up by the Board of
Education, 34-AEH-l, seems to be adequate to take care o f >
permits to attend junior high schools other than their own.
The other form is used so seldom an investigation tending to
^
Appendix A.
Appendix A.
41
its disuse is in order.
A study of the substitute yearly
permit, in letter form used so seldom, is recommended.
Permits for working.
Table VI has to do with the is­
suance of permits for minors to work outside of school hours,
on vacation or Saturdays.
Since the law is very specific
concerning the employment of minors, much responsibility at­
taches to this procedure.
The table evaluates three forms,
one for Saturday and Vacation Work Permit Card (Form B.&),25
two, a Supplementary Information Blank for Work Permit (Form
B-2),26 an(j a Request for Permission to Apply for Work Per­
mit (Form 34-H-19).2?
No substitute forms are used for this
activity, all forms being set up by the central office to
meet legal requirements.
The percentage of use of each of
these is high and consistent.
The same is true of the making,
the registrar again taking the greatest responsibility.
The
same is true for the filing.
Summary of Table V I .
Since the requirements for issu­
ing work permits are set up by the law and the forms have
been made to take care of the legal requirements they are
used consistently without any substitutions.
Appendix A.
26 Appendix A.
Appendix A.
42
TABLE VI
REPORT OF THE STANDARD FORMS USED IN THE PERMITS FOR WORKING, OUTSIDE OF SCHOOL HOURS, .COMPUTED ON A PERCENTAGE BASIS
Responsibility
.
Use
Check the one who is responsible for its making
Forms
Time used
Additional and substitute
forms
Office in which used
©
ft
Permits for working
•H
«H
a
•H
O
.3
£
(1) Saturday and Vacation
Work Permit Card
Form B.8
(2) Supplementary InformationBlank for Work Permit
Form B.2
(3) Request for Permission to
Apply for Work Permit
Form 34-H-19 .
£
©
i—1
O
O
£
£
o
rH
©
o
•H
>
©
©
OO
£
cd
£
P
©
d)
©
PS
©
O
£ ‘
cd
XJ
£
©
P
P
£
O
© TO
O
£ b»
cd £
xJ ©
£ ft
© £
P TO
P
<U
5.6
61.1 27.8
5.6
11.1
5.6 66.7 33.3
5.6
5.6 11.1 11.1 66.7 33.3
£
o
rH
©
TO
£
£
O
O
©
xJ
cd
£
c5
TO
p
£
©
£
cd
ft
£
©
o
i—1
ft
L
cu
p
© •
£
O
©
CO
© £
o o
§ *TO
*£ vH
£ t>
©•H
P T3
P
5.6
5.6
5.6
xJ
o
o
rH
5.6
5.6
5.6
XJ
P
£
cd
P
TO
£
O
O
©
©
©
xJ
S
o
XJ
rH
©
£
£
©
CO
5.6 11.1 66.7
5.6
TO
■fdt
•H
o
-S
£
ft
5.6
AO
•rl
•uS
ft
©
o
•H
>
TO
£
-p
TO
t
©©
ft
•H
rH
rH
O
£
o
•H
TO
•H
c!
©
X*
£
©
P
■g-S
ft
cd £
ft ©
f
t
t
©
TO ft
P "rl •rH £
•TO CO
£
f
t
O
TO
<3?
ft
>
•H
5.6 33.3
5.6 16.7 61.1
61.1
5.6
TO
©
•rH
X©t
X*
8-
TO
£
O
*8
I—I
•H
P
P
P
©
O
£
xcdJ
TO
£
O
©
'g
P
P
ft
P
•H
P
TO
cd
©
CO
5.6 44.4
11.1 11.1 55.6
XJ
O
it
©
£
TO
f£t
ft
g
O
ft
1:2
83*3
x
CO
5.6
5.6 33.3
1:2
77.8
x
5.6
27.8
1:2
83.3
x
NOTE: This table should be read as follows: Saturday and Vacation Work Permit Card, Form B.8, is made by the vice principal
registrar 61.1 per cent of the time, by the attendance clerk 27.8 per cent of the time, by the attendance supervisor 5.6 per cent of
cent of the time; it is used constantly 5.6 per cent of the time, and is seldom used 11.1 per cent of the time, when needed 66.7 per
principal's office 5.6 per cent of the time, in the vice principal's office 5.6 per cent of the time, in the registrar's office 44.4
of copies made are 1:2, the form is still used in 83*3 per cent of the schools, and the substitute forms are used all of the time.
5.6 per cent of the time, by the
the time, by the secretary 5.6 per
cent of the time; is filed in the '
per cent of the time; the number
43
Reports for students sent to the probation officer or
to special schools*
Table VII is concerned with reports made
in connection with pupils who are out of adjustment and pre­
sent a problem involving a transfer to an adjustment school.
The requirements for such a transfer are set up in the office
of research and no substitution may be made In this instance.
The tabulation of the two forms used, Social History Folder
(Form 3 2 - 4 8 ) , and Special Report to Probation Officer (Form
32-7 7 )
shows that 94.4 per cent of the schools have this
type of problem.
It might be assumed that the other per cent,
5.6, have no pupils who need this type of transfer.
Here
again it might be assumed favorable environmental factors de­
termine its use.
It is interesting to note that the vice principals are
the most frequently checked as having the responsibility for
this action.
Summary for Table VII.
The results of this tabulation
indicate satisfactory forms have been worked out to take care
of this procedure.
The responsibility for making these forms
is distributed over a number of persons, no one of whom as­
sumes the greatest responsibility to any appreciable extent.
Appendix A.
2^ Appendix A.
TABLE VII
REPORT OF THE -.STANDARD FORMS USED IN THE REPORTS FOR STUDENTS SENT TO THE PROBATION OFFICER OR TO SPECIAL SCHOOLS, COMPUTED ON A PERCENTAGE BASIS
Responsibility
-
Use
Check the one who is responsible
for its making
Time used
Forms
Additional' and substitute
forms
Office in which used
g
0
CO
•H
ft
q>
rf
O
H
Reports for students sent to
probation officer or to
special schools
&
•H
t
•OH
■S
G
ft
(1) Social History Folder
Form 32.AS
g
ft
©
O
•H
16.7 55.6
(2) Special Report to
Probation Officer
Form 32.77
5.6 33.3
(3) Request for Legal
Action
5.6
G
O
H
©
©
g
0
0
©
ft
G
CO
G
G
P
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O
O
G
G
G
G
§
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p
p
<5?
P
P
<*:
0
.5
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©
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0
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—1
©
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rt
3
0
0
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o3
G
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O
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ft
ft
O
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O
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P
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P
G
G
P
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ft
G
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JQ
5.6
11.1
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0
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rH
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5.6
&
•H
O
G
©
G
©
•S
G
ft
©
G
©
fi
11.1 11.1 72.2
5.6 38.9 55.6 27.8 11.1
27.8 66.7
©
»■
i—1
5.6 11.1 72.2
5.6
Ph
©
0
vH
1
—1
©
«•
&
G
©
•H
bo
©
ft
P
G
©
G S
•S t
P G
cd f t
£i ©
O G
G
ft
5.6 27.8
O
O
.G
O
©
©
G
G
ft
H
©
G
O
•H
P
O
©
©
©
O
G
G
G
G
©
P
P
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33.3
16.7 55.6 16.7
5.6
5.6
5.6
©
G
g
TO
©
•H
ft
O
O
ft
O
G
©
*§
3
G
©
©
G
rH
rH
•H
P
TO
£
G
O
ft
1:2
94.4
2:4
88.8
1
5.6
P
G
O
ft
©
P
G
P
•H
P
©
G
G
CO
x
NOTE: This table should be read as follows: Social History Folder, Form 32.48, is made by the principal 16.7 per cent of the time, by the vice principal
55.6 per cent of the time, by the counselor 5.6 per cent of the time, by the registrar 38.9 per cent cf the time, by the attendance clerk 55.6 per cent of the
time, by the attendance supervisor 27.8 per cent of the time, by the grade counselor 11.1 per cent of the time; it is used constantly 11.1 per cent of the time,
is seldom used 11.1 per cent of the time, and when needed 72.2 per cent of the time; it is filed in the vice principal's office 5.6 per cent of the time, in the
registrar's office 27.8 per cent of the time, in the welfare school office .33.3 per'cent of the time; the number of copies made, are
1:2, the
form is stillused
in 94.4 per cent of the schools, and the substitute forms are used all the time.
45
For students transferring away from this .junior high
school.
Table ¥111 is a tabulation of all the standard forms
used in the transfer of students from this school within or
without the city.
Since the turnover by transfer from one
school to another
in some districts is very large, it is im­
portant that the work involved in this connection should be
simplified as much as possible.
forms have been evaluated.
In this tabulation three
The first one is a Clearance
Card (Form 34-H-16),30 ^ 10^ must be carried by the pupil
around the school to all of his teachers, the school librarian,
student-body manager, counselor, registrar, and the vice
principal or principal.
ready for transfer.
As soon as his card is cleared he is
This form is provided by the Board of
Education, and Is used in 94.5 per cent of cases studied.
No
substitutions have been made for this but it is not used in
all schools, as the above figures indicate.
The registrar*s
office is again the place where the report is filed in most
instances, and the making also is in the hands of the regis­
trar.
The second form, Pupil Accounting Report (Form 34-H-3),31
which is used for pupil accounting, is used in all schools.
It is a required form, no substitutions can be accepted, and
3° Appendix A.
^
Appendix A.
46
TABLE VIII
REPORT OF THE STANDARD FORMS USED IN THE TRANSFER OF STUDENTS FROM THIS SCHOOL, COMPUTED ON A PERCENTAGE BASIS
.
'
' Responsibility
Use
Check the one who is responsible
for its making
. Time used
Forms
Additional and substitute
forms
Office in which used
u
o
0
•H
o
O
ft
■fc
CD
HO
Transferring away from
this school
CD
u
p
0
bl>
©
ft
S
■a3
©
p
p
«j!
(1) Clearance Card
Form 34-H-16
66.7
50.
(2) Pupil Accounting Report
Form.34-EH-3
55.6
61.1
(3) Credentials Sent
A. Substitute form for gathering:
1. Cumulative Record card
2. Health Card
3. Orange Card
4. Psychology Card
5. Transfer
6. Other procedures
5.6
(D
ft
O
r-t
CO
0
s
3c:
0
p
p
■<c
5.6
0
0
O
o
0
TJ
CCJ
Is
50
§
-d
0
d
0
0
•
iH
ctj
m0m
U
O
0
mr
n
.
u
cd
u
ft
•d
1—1
0
0
p
0
0
.5
rS •
ft
-d
0
to
0
ft
5.6
c
c
ft
s
o
5.6
38.9
55.6
44.4
55.6
5.6
mm0
u
C
0
o
0
bo
.3
>
•H
0
O
0
05
11.1
77.8
5.6
5.6
88.8
11.1
5.6
0
0
•H
ft
O
d
0
0
3
O
0
ft
0
U
0
0 TJ
g
d
•H
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0
P
2
S
P
•H
P
0
-ft
CO
U
O
94.4
2:3
o
ft
ft
2
x
100.
5.6
x
NOTE: This table should be read as follows: Clearance Card, Form 34-H-16, is made by the registrar 66.7 per cent of the time, by the attendance
clerk 50 per cent of the time, by the attendance supervisor 5.6 per cent of the time, by the grade counselor 5.6 per cent of the time; it is constantly
used 38.9 per cent of the time, and when needed 55.6 per cent of the time; it is filed in the principal's office 5*6 per cent of the time, in the
counselor's office 11.1 per cent of the time, in the registrar's office 77*8 per cent of the time,and in the receiving, school 5.6 per cent of the time.
The number of copies made is one, the form is still used in 94.4 per cent of the schools, and the substitute forms are used some of the times.
47
transfers are not accepted without it.
It is taken care of
exclusively in the r e g i s t r a r s office.
It is filed there
also in 8809 per cent of the cases studied.
One additional form is found in this table.
It is
used for gathering all of the materials used in the transfer.
It is used in 5.6 per cent of the cases.
The matter of ac­
cumulating these data depends on how and where the material
is filed in the school.
If it is filed in the classrooms the
task of gathering it together could be facilitated by means
of a plan set up in a form to be used for this purpose.
This
substitute form might prove to be helpful to others who have
similar situations and for that reason it should be studied
with the idea of making it a regular form.
Most of the satis
factory forms now in use have been developed in this way.
Summary of Table ¥111.
The clerical work involved in
transferring pupils is satisfactorily handled by means of the
present forms as indicated by the tabulation of Table III.
The additional form might after investigation be set up as a
regular form in sehools having situations which require
gathering materials from many places within the school.
Summary.
It is evident that in the enrollment of
pupils the procedure is quite uniform in so far as regular
forms are concerned.
The fact that fifteen substitute forms
are being used raises the question of need for further study
4S
leading toward a new standard form which would cover all situ­
ations.
It has been observed that the registrar is the one
person in the school who, more than any other, meets new stu­
dents.
Hot in one instance does the principal meet new stu­
dents at the time of entrance.
The method of keeping attendance records is so defi­
nitely set up in the central office there is little oppor­
tunity to change the procedure.
Here we find the greatest
uniformity of practice.
The procedure of reporting attendance to the central
office is likewise uniform throughout the junior high schools
surveyed.
In the matter of the use of permits within the school
there is great inconsistency, each individual school having
its own forms and procedures, one important finding indicates
a need to investigate the extent to which other persons than
the principal excuse pupils from school.
The Board of Educa­
tion authorizes only the principal to take this responsibility.
The apparent disregard of tardiness needs further study.
Issuing permits to attend other junior high schools is
taken care of satisfactorily by the form set up for that
purpose.
The issuance of work permits is likewise uniform in
procedure, which is governed by legal requirements.
When a school finds it necessary to send pupils to
49
adjustment schools there is just one procedure to follow.
The schools surveyed are following that consistently.
Transferring pupils to regular junior high schools is
a regular routine followed by over 90 per cent of the cases.
The same is true of the pupil accounting report which is a
required form.
One additional form was found in this table.
It is recommended that this form be evaluated and if it is
found to be helpful in all schools it should be adopted.
CHAPTER V
RECOMMENDATIONS AMD CONCLUSIONS
Purpose of the chapter.
It is the purpose of this
chapter to outline a plan which can he used in connection
with the problems of reporting and accounting which center
in the attendance office of a junior high school*
The plan
will be set up on certain criteria which have been developed
in the study and which have evolved through experience in an
attendance office.
Attendance record (Form 34-H-9A).^
These cards are
the most important of any used in the attendance office.
The sum total of these cards makes up the school registry.
They are referred to constantly because of the information
they record, namely, the attendance record of the pupil and
certain historical information.
They are fastened into a
patent drawer-like holder which when pulled out reveals the
name of every card in the case.
When the card is fastened
in the holder only one side is exposed.
Only by removing
the card from the holder can the information on the reverse
side be read because the present form is printed in such a
way as to be upside down to the reader.
Appendix B
It is recommended
51
that the reverse side ^sfoich is now useless be printed so it
can be read when it is turned over in the holder and the top
side remain as it is now printed*
differ from the other*-
The reverse side would
The space at the left could be used
to record notes or additional information about the pupil.
The present form must be changed completely at the end of
the third semester*
The new form could be used for the six
semesters the pupil is in junior high school.
In a large
district like Los Angeles this item alone would save many
thousands of dollars s*.
File card*2
This card was devised at ICern Avenue
Junior High School to facilitate the transfer of information
to schools requesting information concerning pupils recently
entered.
When a child transfers to a new school certain in­
formation is requested immediately by the new school.
The
information is collected on the file card which is readily
accessible in the attendance office.
This same information
is to be found on the reverse side of the revised attendance
record (Form 34-H.9A).
If additional information is required
it may be found in the cumulative envelope.
Cumulative envelopes*3
2 Appendix B.
3 Appendix B.
Because of the many types of
52
guidance and attendance records and information which accumu­
late for each pupil during the course of his attendance in
the school it is necessary to have one repository in which
all of this material may he collected and filed.
pository is called a cumulative envelope.
This re­
All materials of
value which reach the counselor or the registrar are placed
in this envelope.
Since much of this material is valuable
and cannot be replaced it is necessary to set up every pre­
caution to safeguard it.
On the other hand, if it is to be
locked away where no one can have access to it, its value is
lost.
One of the requisites of good guidance demands acces­
sibility of guidance material.
and accessible is a problem.
take care of this.
How to keep them flexible
A scheme has been devised to
All envelopes are filed in large steel
files set up in the attendance office.
The procedure for re­
moving this material follows: Special envelopes are provided
for this purpose and a record is made of the removal.
The
original file envelope remains in the...file to keep the cumu­
lative file complete.
When the material is returned to the
file a clearance is given to the person who requested it.
Materials found in the cumulative envelopes may in­
clude any one or more of the following items:
1.
Attendance Record.
2.
Orange card (birth record).
3*
Report cards (not including the preceding
53
semester’s; these are in a separate file in the counselor’s
office.
Teachers are urged to refer to them.)
4.
Cumulative record. •
5.
Autobiographies written in A6 grade.
6.
Anecdotal information from A6 teachers.
7.
Elementary test data.
S.
Front covers of tests given at Kern.
9.
Transcripts from other schools.
10
.
.
12 .
11
Observation slips from Kern faculty.
Notes from parents.
Notes pertaining to students on probation.
Office Becord
I have the following for _________________________
files:
from the
(check material taken).
Attendance card________________
Cumulative record card________ _
Cumulative envelope____________
Program card______ .
____________
Pupil check sheet______________
Report card___________ ______ ■
Test data card
__________ _
Si gne d
Permission to re-enter class(Form
vision of this
_____________________
2 k -H-49). k The
re­
card has made possible the elimination ofmuch
^ Appendix B.
54
wasteful effort and time.
been made more usable.
The information now recorded has
It is necessary* when a child returns
from absence, to record the reason for the absence which is
translated by number to the left-hand section of the form.
This necessitated two operations on to check each side.
large numbers
When
are waiting at the attendance office desk for
readmittance, speed of operation is desirable.
In the re­
vised form one operation will take care of both sections of
the form.
Another important feature in the revision has to
do with investigation of the absence.
When the legitimacy
of a pupil’s absence is in question a; request is immediately
made to the attendance supervisor to investigate the cause
of the absence.
At present form 34-BH-5 is used to give the
officer the necessary information to proceed with the case.
The revision provides all of the information essential to
make investigation thus eliminating the search through the
attendance file or the registration card file.
in favor of the revision is its recency.
the card immediately upon his return.
Another point
The pupil fills out
Such items as eorreet
address and phone number will be up to date.
Daily master absence sheet.5
This is an adaptation of
a form which is used in a very few schools but as yet is not
included among the authorized forms used in the city schools.
5
Appendix B
55
Besides giving the attendance office the daily picture of
nonattendance it also presents an up-to-date summary of the
previous day’s absence including individual eases which need
to be checked.
This form meets one criterion for good at­
tendance recording, namely, that of being cumulative.
The
recording of absences applies not only to attendance in
school, but it takes care of every period in the day as re­
ported by teachers on the classroom attendance.
The procedure for recording data on the master sheet
is fairly simple.
It begins in home room when the teacher
notes the absence, records it on the permission to re-enter
class form, and sends it to the attendance office.
The first
period teacher in turn, records the absence on an absence
notice.
Each of' these serves as a check on the other.
It
is usually assumed if both teachers record the absence the
pupil is really not in school.
A tardy child who enters
home room after attendance has been taken will have his at­
tendance cleared when the first period teacher notes his
presence.
After all reports are in from the first two
teachers the master sheet is made up alphabetically, mimeo­
graphed, and.sent to all classrooms.
From this the teachers
may check attendance throughout the day.
This alphabetical
list includes not only the present dayf,s absences, but those
^ Appendix B
56
of previous days.
The number of days’ absence is also re­
corded for each pupil.
Thus each teacher is furnished with
a cumulative, up-to-date record of the absences of all pupils.
One more step in the procedure is necessary to complete the
picture.
If a teacher finds a pupil whose name is not in
the master sheet absent from her classroom she immediately
notifies the attendance office by means of a white absence
slip.
If on the other hand she finds present in her room a
pupil who has been recorded absent she sends that pupil to
the attendance office unless he can present to the teacher a
permission to re-enter class form.
Lest the late person might be inclined to question
the need for so much cheeking and rechecking, one need only
to be reminded of the fact that in the average junior high
school over a thousand pupils move five or more times a day,
and every one of them must be accounted for every minute.
Likewise the whereabouts of every single one of them must
be known to the office every minute of the day.
Since the
children are permitted to move about freely so many times
during the day there is always the temptation for some to
deviate from the normal procedure and leave the school.
Another important factor in this connection has to do with
allocation of state and district funds on the basis of at­
tendance, so in the interest of economy and safety the school
must not relax one moment in its custodial relationship with
eacii individual child.
One more district advantage of the
master sheet has to do with the fact that the absence notice
in the master sheet is more usable than the absence notice
(form 412) mentioned in Appendix A.
must fill out one for each absentee.
In this form the teacher
This involves signing
her name as many times as she has absentees and writing the
number of the period and the date on each one as well.
The
new absence notices are padded together and perforated with
period one in the lower right-hand corner.
first and sent to the attendance office.
This is torn off
If there are no
absentees except those on the daily master absence sheet,
the teacher writes none or O.K. on the slip.
In this manner
the office has a check on every teacher for every period of
the day.
Statistical work sheet.
This form, Statistical Work
Sheet,? has been devised to help compile the information
necessary for the the statistical report (form 51.5)*
This
report is a monthly report on the enrollment, absence, aver­
age daily attendance, and percentage of attendance by grades
for the entire school.
The form is set up with the data in
the same order as on the statistical report.
The count is
taken by half grades, boys and girls separately.
By breaking
it up into smaller units the report is easier to do and there
? Appendix B.
58
is less chance for errors.
After the four sheets are com­
piled separately, four are assembled onto one sheet.
In this
manner, one person can compile statistics and another can check
check each sheet, which tends to make the report more accu­
rate.
The information is then in the proper order and ready
to be transmitted to the statistical report (form 51.5)*
Hall pass.&
The problem of hall passes or permits
within the school, was Included in a section of the question­
naire used in this study.
There was so little uniformity of
procedure on this problem
that some comment and suggestion
are in order.
One school had, as many as eleven forms to be
used by the student who for one reason or another requests
to leave the room.
For each of the regular forms discussed
in this group there was a substitute form being used.
All of
which is an indication of the fact that much valuable teacher
time is being consumed in taking care of this item.
As a
substitute for all of this the metal hall pass is recommended.
This pass is large enough to show at a glance that the pupil
has a hall credential In his hand.
When he leaves the room
he takes this pass and leaves a card on which he has written
his own name and the time he leaves.
When he returns he
checks the time on the card and returns the pass.
The
teacher can, if necessary check the card at various times to
& Appendix B.
59
see if anyone is abusing the privilege.
In addition to the hall pass the teacher issues a
library pass, a card marked Library, which gives him permis­
sion to visit the library for study or research.
Another is a blue-green form, permit to leave the
room, (form 34-H-4S).
This is to be used when a student does
not expect to return to the room he leaves, or when from
necessity more than one student leaves the classroom at the
same time.
Hall passes issued by the administration:
1.
Entering student with new program.
2.
Withdrawal card.
3.
Re-entrance card, good only a few minutes after
stamped by office.
4.
Tardy slips (white and blue), time-stamped.
5.
Office summons (brown form).
6.
Return from office (brown form).
7.
Brown change of program.
8.
Monitors’ badges— good two or three minutes be­
fore and after close of periods.
9.
Cafe help— pupils*
cafe lunch tickets, good only
three minutes before lunch.
10.
before assembly.
Orchestra— excused without pass fifteen minutes
60
11.
Permit to leave library.
Record blanks of teachers1 home visits.
important unit in the guidance program.
This is an
It is used by the
registrar, counselor, vice principal, and teachers, in re­
cording information obtained in making home calls.
The' value
of such calls cannot be measured in terms of building a
friendly relationship between the home and the school.
It
takes a forceful speaker to convert an audience to a point of
view.
A person-to-person contact is far more effective in
developing mutual understanding.
In the home call the school
and the parent meet to talk over the child’s problem.
Teach­
ers should find the techniques of an interview helpful in
creating the best possible impression on the home.
The importance of these home interviews has a direct
relationship with good attendance.
Because attendance problems find their beginnings in
the home it is very important thatvthe attendance office
create and maintain rapport with parents at all times.
A
close relationship with the parents is essential in the in­
terest of attendance as well as that o f b e t t e r understand­
ing of the pupils.
This relationship may be brought about
through conferences held at the school to which parents are
invited and through home visitation.
In order to insure
satisfactory results from home visits it is necessary that
careful planning precede the visit.
The technique of an
61
interview has been set up to help teacherscconduct an inter­
view.
A follow-up or a report of the visit is written up on
the blank provided for that purpose.
This visiting record
includes such important items as the purpose of the visit,
the condition of the home, the attitude of the parent toward
the school, and the reactions of the visitor to the whole
situation.
The records of these visits are filed and become
very useful materials in connection with guidance.
Mechanical changes.
There are some mechancial changes
that would help in the use of most of the forms.
The first
would be to have the spacing conform to the spacing on the
typewriter both horizontally and vertically.
The next mechanical change would be to have the form
numbers placed in the same position on all of the forms.
Also to have the form numbers for each group such as enroll­
ing the student to be consecutive, form 34-H-56, next form
34-H-57, and so on.
There are one or two minor changes that have been
typed on the regular form in the appendix.
All of -these changes have been set up on the basis of
improving the present system through providing a means of
keeping a cumulative system, eliminating unnecessary details,
making the plan of accounting and recording more compact, m a k
ing the data readily available to teachers, providing a sim­
pler and easier method of work, guarding against loss of
62
needed information or data, providing a means of tracing chil­
dren with ease over a
In addition to
period of years.
the above criteria which
guided the
planning of this study, there has been a trend in the direc­
tion of centralization of responsibility for items of such
importance as attendance, upon which tax money is based.
Uniformity of procedure in keeping with good business prac­
tice has also been an
important item of consideration.
omies of time and materials are
also important
Econ­
considerations.
Most important of all is the necessity for providing a quick
procedure to detect truancy which is one of the three main
causes of delinquency.
The cost of keeping a normal child in
junior high was #148.00 last year; to keep a delinquent child
in Whittier State School for one year cost #810.00.
In Los
Angeles It costs more than three hundred dollars to put a
single boy through juvenile delinquency procedings.
Another important item related to the problem of quick
and efficient handling of attendance has to do with health
and its relation to the problem.
A child*s health is better
supervised in school than it is in many homes.
Many days of
attendance are lost because of an inadequate system of check­
ing absences of the first day they occur.
A home call made
to the home immediately following the absence makes each ab-^
sentee an Individual rather than a mere bit of statistical
data.
63
Summary,
The afore-mentioned plan seemed to be justi­
fied in view of the multiplicity of forms now being used, the
lack of uniformity of procedure, and the variance of types of
positions to which the duties and responsibilities are in­
trusted,
It is therefore recommended:
That a standard, uniform method of procedure be incor­
porated into a manual to be used as a guide in the attendance
office.
That the responsibility be centered in a certificated
person who is designated as the registrar, who has had
special training for the work.
That the possibility of connecting attendance and health
be investigated and realized.
One per cent of increase of at­
tendance in Los Angeles City would result in an added income
of $150,000 a year.
The greatest source of income paid into
each school district unit
is based upon the total days’ attend­
ance of all pupils
living in the district.
very important and
necessary that errors of accounting be elim­
inated.
It is therefore
A uniform system of accounting would eliminate much
loss through error.
In a uniform system of accounting many
short cuts will be devised.
quantities makes for economy.
The printing of forms in large
In a uniform system of account­
ing registrars can be trained to handle the work more effi­
ciently.
Clerical work can be cut down to a minimum, thus
freeing the registrar to devote more time to give educational
64
guidance to pupils in the matter of attendance and thereby
increasing attendance.
This guidance will include the teach­
ing of good health habits as well as mental habits in connec­
tion with attendance and with the realization that school
creates the conditions in which learning can take place.
That the registrar should be the liaison officer be­
tween the home and the school and the community.
That the attendance office direct propaganda toward
teachers and parents to keep them informed of the status of
attendance and the many social and health problems related
to it.
That every junior high school make a study of nonat­
tendance to determine if possible the causes, and through
education eliminate or lessen some of the causes.
That the central attendance office collect all sub­
stitute and additional forms reported in this thesis for
evaluation and study.
As a result of this study such forms
as seem valuable should be made available to other schools.
That the central office take the responsibility of
heading up the program of improving attendance and instruct­
ing attendance teachers and registrars in the best procedures
for securing better attendance.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
BIBLIOGRAPHY
A.
BOOKS
Ayers, Leonard P . , Child Accounting in Public Schools.
Vol.. I ; Cleveland: Survey Commission of Cleveland Founda
tion, 1915*
An analysis of the accounting of pupils in the Cleveland
schools.
Cornell, W. S . , Keeping of Records, Health and Medical In­
spection of School Children. New York: F» A. Davis
Company, 1920.
Pp. 45-49.
Discussion of administration of records.
Cubberley, E. P. , The Principal and His School. New York:
Houghton Mifflin Company, 1923.
Chap. X . , pp. 201-208.
An account of the record keeping in a school.
Emmons, Frederick E . , City School Attendance Service. New
York: Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, Columbia
University, 1926.
An account of attendance records and administration.
Ganders, Harry S . , A System of School Records and Reports
for Smaller Cities. Greeley, Colorado: Colorado State
Teachers College, 1926.
P. 191.
A comprehensive study of records and report-keeping
practices in typical smaller cities in the United States
suggested standards for a school accounting system.
Hanus, Paul H . , School Administration and School Reports.
Cambridge, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin Company,
1920.
Chap. XDII, pp. 40-98.
Some more suggestions for the management of the school
and its records.
Heck, Arch 0., Administration of Pupil Personnel. Boston:
Ginn and Company, 1929.
A book on pdpil accounting written from the point of
view of the classroom teacher.
_________ , A Study of Child Accounting Records. Ohio State
University Studies, No. 9, Vol. II, 245 p p . ; Columbus,
Ohio: Ohio State University, 1925.
A comprehensive study of items to be recorded, manner of
recording, importance of proper forms, and need of
uniformity.
67
Heck, Arch 0. , and W. G. Reeder, The Uniform School Account­
ing System, Bloomington, Illinois: Public School Pub­
lishing Company, 1929#
Loose material in envelope, a teacher’s handbook and
forms for the pupil personnel.
McAllister, Abel J#., and Arthur S. Otis., Child Accounting
' Practice. Yonkers, Hew York: World Book Company, 1927#
Pp. 117-144.
Gives some of the methods of child accounting records
bpt deals mainly with attendance forms.
Reeder, W. G . , "Efficiency in Office Administration," and
"School Accounting," Fundamentals of Public School A d ­
ministration.
Chicago, Illinois: Macmillan Company,
1930.
Chaps. XKIII and 2 H V , pp. 483-534.
Functions of records and necessary forms for child ac­
counting in secondary schools.
Roberts, I. Earle, "School Records and Reports," Research
Bulletin of the National Education Association. No. 5,
Vol. V; Washington, D. G . ; National Education Associa­
tion, 1927.
127 PP.
Detailed discussion and constructive suggestions by the
Committee on Uniform Records and Reports of the Depart­
ment of Superintendence; practical recommendations based
upon comprehensive study of present condition of child
accounting.
Strayer, George D . , and N. L. Engelhardt, School Records and
Reports. New York: Buruau of Publications, Teachers
College, Columbia University, 1923.
81 pp.
A list of guiding principles to govern adequate child
accounting systems; score card and checking list of
reeords and reports of a school system in a city of ten
thousand people or less.
B.
PERIODICAL ARTICLES
Bruce, W. C . , "A Complete Pupil Record System," American
School Board Journal, 59:60, 95, ^Tuly, 1919.
Description of forms and records used in the Cicero,
Illinois, system.
_________, "The Clerical Function of the Principalship," R e ­
search Bulletin of the National Educational Association,
No. 2, 6:110-112, March, 1928.
Suggestions for handling office routine.
68
Emmons, Frederick E. , "School Records and Reports," National
Education Association Research Bulletin, No. 5, 5:231245, 1927.
Engelhardt, N. L . , ^Bibliography of School Records and Re­
ports," Teachers College Record, 26:765-781, May, 1925.
Heck, A. 0. , "National Educational Association and Uniformity
in Child Accounting," Educational Research Bulletin of
Ohio State University. No. 2., 4:23-29, January, 1925.
Keppel, A. R . , "A Phase of Record Keeping," School and So­
ciety, 29:340-842, June 26, 1929.
General discussion of types of records to be kept and
manner of record keeping.
Maxwell, P. A., "Clerks for Teachers," Journal of the National
Education Association. 17:8, January, 1929.
Types of clerical work done by teachers, and data relat­
ing thereto.
Morgan, Walter E . , "The Administration of Secondary School
Attendance," Bulletin of the California State Department
of Education. September, 1939.
Summarizes the state law and suggests secondary school
attendance forms.
Moehlman, Arthur B . , "Child Accounting," Journal of Educa­
tional Research. 9:293-304, April, 1924.
Problems of child accounting, and needs for uniform
records.
________ , "Child Accounting," Journal of Educational Research.
9:415-423, May, 1924.
Historical aspect of child accounting; discussion of uni­
form terminology.
Peterson, W. Lloyd, "High School Records," American School
Board Journal, 64:52-53, 140, June, 1922.
A suggested form for pupil permanent record, on the basis
of an analysis of records used in ninety cities.
Reavis, W. C . , and R. Woellner, "Labor Saving Devices Used in
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37:498-509, September, 1929.
A summary of the present trend with reference to types of
records to be kept.
Roberts, J. Earle, "A Twelve-Year Record System for Pupils,"
American School Board Journal. 73:79-80, September, 1926.
Uiscussion of items to be included on records, and methods
of filing data.
69
Stoops, R. C . , "Characteristics of an Acceptable Local Sys­
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Thompson, L. S . , "Statistics Which Should Be Kept on File in
the Office of the High School Principal," School Review,
35:15-26, January, 1927.
Desirable information to be kept.on file to facilitate
the principal’s annual report.
Updegraff, Harlin, "Uniform Records and Reports," School and
Society.(3:373-360. April, 1916.
A plea for standardization.
C.
PUBLICATIONS OF LEARNED ORGANIZATIONS
Cook, R. R . , "Report of the Committee on Standard Blanks,"
Proceedings of the Sixty-Sixth Annual Meeting of the
National Education Association. Department of Secondary
Principals.
Washington, D.C.: National Education
Association, 1926.
Pp. 619-624.
Values of records; tentative standardized forms suggested
for pupil permanent records.
Final Report of the Committee on Uniform Records and Reports
to the National Council at the S t . Louis Meeting of the
National Education Association. Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 1912.
Lewis, Samuel, First Annual Report of the Superintendent of
Common Schools.
Document 17, Thirty-sixth General As­
sembly of the State of Ohio, 1637, pp. 19-20.
Early history of school record keeping.
Mort, Paul R . , "Report of the Commission on Standard Blanks,"
Eleventh Yearbook of the National Association of Secondary
Principals. Berwyn, Illinois: [n.p.], 1927.
Pp. 136-146.
Results of the investigation as to nature of items for
pupil permanent records; qtuestionnaire for gathering data.
_________, "Report of the Committee on Standard Blanks," Tenth
Yearbook of the National Association of Secondary School
Principals. Berwyn, Illinois: [n.p.], pp. 32-33.
Explanation of the plan of procedure for the gathering
and analyzing of material for standardization of per­
manent records used.
70
"Report of the Committee on Uniform Records and Reports,”
Proceedings of the national Education Association, Depart
ment of Superintendence. Chicago: University of Chicago
Press, 1911#
Troxel, Oliver L . , and Leonard V. Koo s . , ”An Analysis of High
School Record Forms,” Tenth Yearbook of the National A s ­
sociation of Secondary School Principals. Berwyn,
Illinois: In.p.], 1926. Pp. 33-57.
Detailed committee report on types of forms to use in
secondary schools, analysis of items, and statistics as
to mechanical features of forms.
D.
UNPUBLISHED MATERIALS
Johnson, B. Lamar, ”An Investigation of Permanent Record
Cards for Secondary Schools.” Unpublished thesis,
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1927.
117 pp.
Detailed analysis of pupil permanent records from schools
throughout the United States with suggestions for stand­
ardization as to number and nature of items to be included,
size and arrangement of forms.
1.
THESES REVIEWED
Deaton, J. C . , ”A Study of the High School Records, Forms
and Reports Other than Financial in Five Missouri Cities.”
Unpublished Master’s thesis, The University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, 1932.
Flagg, I. Q . , "Pupil Personal Records and Reports for Los
Angeles,” Unpublished Master’s thesis. The University
of Southern California, 1934.
van Barnwell, Mary, ’’Administration of Registration, Records
and Allied Student Problems in the Large Senior High
Schools in Los Angeles.” Unpublished Master’s thesis,
The University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1930.
Phelps, Amy Lincoln, "Method of Routine Procedure for FourYear High Schools of One Thousand or More Students.”
Unpublished Master’s thesis, The University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, 1929.
71
Prout, Ralph Byron, ”A Study of High School Records and Re­
ports Other than Financial*w Unpublished Master’s thesis,
The University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1929*
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
A.
QUESTIONNAIRE
B.
FORMS USED IN THE QUESTIONNAIRE
1.
Enrolling the student
2.
Attendance of student after lieis in
3.
Regular attendance reports
4.
Permits used within the school
theschool
Permit requests to attend a junior high school other
than this junior high school
6.
Permits for working
7.
Reports for students sent to the probation
officer
or to special schools
8.
For students transferring away from this junior high
school
QUESTIONNAIRE ON "THE UTILIZATION OF STANDARD ATTENDANCE
FORMS IN THE JUNIOR' HIGH SCHOOLS OF LOS ANGELES."
The purpose of this questionnaire is to determine the use of standard
records, forms, and reports that are used in the attendance offices of the
twenty-nine junior high schools in los Angeles.
-Please check in the appro­
priate places*
If you are using a form
vfaich you have substituted for one of the
standard forms, I should appreciate your enclosing that form, telling
why and how you are using it.
The forms are divided into the following groups:
1.
Enrolling the student
2*
Attendance of the student after he
.3*
is in the
school
Regular attendance reports
4.
Permits used within the school
5.
Permit requests to attend a junior high school other
than this junior high school.
6.
Permits for working
7.
Reports for students sent
to special schools
tothe Probation Officer or
8.
For students transferring away from this junior high
school
M r , Maher
This work has the approval of Miss Carey,land Mr# Hoyt.
An early
reply as well as any comments you care to make will be greatly appreciated.
The results will be available at a later date.
Thank you,
Stanley L. Taufman,JRegistrar
Kern Avenue Junior High School
tf\
CHECK THE ONE WHO IS
RESPONSIBLE FOR ITS
MAKING
ADDrpj;uNAb
OFFICE IN WHICH FILED
AID
SUBSTITUTE FORMS
ENROLLING THE STUDENT
CD Or
«1a;
l>i o
(l) Registration Card
form 3U-H-56
(2) Program Card (Buff)
Form 3^-H-llA
(3 ) Program
Card (White)
Form 3I+-H-52
(U) Program Card
Form 3 U-H-53
(5) Change of Program
Form 3^-H-^O
(6 ) Registration Record
Form 3 U-H-IO6
(7) Others (Please name)
&
vO
I
CHECK THE OWE WHO IS
RESPONSIBLE FOR ITS
MAKING
4! I
ADDITIONAL
AND
SUBSTITUTE FORMS
iis
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ft
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to
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(1) Attendance Record
Form 34-H-9A
(2) Re-entrance Card
Form 34-H-49
(3) Absence Notice
Form 412
4~
T i l Request for Investigation
Form 34“EH~5
(5) Noti ce of Absence
__ _____
Form 32 >69
(6 ) Attendance Notice to Parentsj
Form 34— EH-16
(7j~Request for Home Visit
Form 33 0127
(8 ) Dental Appointment Service
Form 33s64
,
(9) Dental Appointment Service
Form 33*66
(10) Exemption from School Atte
ance Form 34-EH-21
(11) Others (Please name)
! i
44
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li
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(2) Classification Report
Form 51,2
(3 ) Statistical Report
Form 51*5
(4) Eight Months Proof Sheet
Form 51*13
(5) Duplicate Attendance Record
for Non-Residents (7th & 8th
Form H 51,10______ grade)
!!
(?) Report of Non-Resident Pupils
Form 43,13
(Jr. & High)
(8) Others (Please name)
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Assistant Superintendent
Educational Housing Section
Others (Name them,")”
Humber of copies
Yes
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No
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No
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Vice-Principal
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Registrar
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Grade Counselor
Home Room Teacher
Classroom Teacher
doctor
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Constant
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Principal* s
vice-Principdl1s
Counselor*s
Registra r ’s
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Grade Counselor’s
Home Room
“Qla ssroom
Stat i stical
Assistant Superintendent
Educational Housing Section
Others "(Name them.;
Number
Yes
No™
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
of copies made
Form still used
Substitute Form
Additional Form
Form enclosed
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PERMITS FOR WORKISG
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(2) Supplementary Information
Blank for Work Permit
Form B.2
(3) Request for Permission to j
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!
Form 34—H-19
(4) Others (Please name)
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Form 32.7-7
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Home Room Teacher
Classroom Teacher
Doctor
Nurse
Others "(Nhine themTT
Constant
Seldom
When needed
Not at all
Principal*s
Vice-Principal *s
Counselorrs
Registrar *s_
Gymnasium
Grade Counselor's
Home Room
Classroom
Assistant Superintendent
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Others (Name them*
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ENROLLING THE STUDENT
1.
Registration Card
(Form 34-H-56)
2.
Program Card (Buff)
(Form 34-H-11A)
3.
Program Card (White)
(Form 34-H-52)
4.
Program Card
(Form 34-H-53)
5.
Change of Program
(Form 34-H-40)
6.
Registration Records
(Form 34-H-106)
Registration Number
Boy
Name..............................................................................................................
(L ast)
"
(F irst)
(M iddle)
(E ncircle)
Address.............................................................
E
Etr
Date of B irth
Etrs
Telephone..........................................
Date of Entrance......................................
(E ncircle)
Grade.......................
.................................. Place of Birth.................................... ...................... - ...........................................
M onth
D ay
Year
City
State
School last attended............................................................................... .................................................................... .................
School
Name of Parent or Legal Guardian
City
State
.....
Address........ ...........................................
Parent’s Business Address................................
Telephone.......................................
Race or Nationality, encircle or' insert correct name: English, Spanish or Mexican, Negro, Japanese, Chinese,
Jewish, Italian, German, etc..................................... ...... ......... ................................................................................................
Remarks:......................
........................................................................... ...............
REGISTRATION CARD, LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOLS
Form 34-H-S6 200M 9-39
Form 34-H-11A — 50M4-38
Program Card— Los Angeles City Junior and Senior High Schools______________
Per
Residence
1
Telephone
2
Pgrent or Guardian
3
Business Address of Parent
4
Date of Birth
Month
Day
Year
Room
Days
Subject
a c m e 25639-61
Grade
Teacher
5
Course
6
School last attended
Adviser’s check for regular program:
7
Correct Subjects____ One Extra (Opt.)_____
Four S olid s.............. .. If program is irregular,
Phys. Education____ permit for____________
Full time..................... . . . . __________________
8
Program approved by
9
Home Room Adviser
Last Name
First Name
'
10
Grade
Home Room
Date
M onth
Date
Year
oa
VJl
I
.................................................................................Grade.................. H. R...................Date.................................
Last Name
First Name
Month Day Year
Per. Room Days
Residence
Subject
Grade
Teacher
1
Telephone
2
Parent or Guardian
Date of Birth
Month Day Year
Course
3
4
School last attended
5
School activity, or office held
6
7
8
Program approved by
9
Home Room Adviser
P ro g r a m C ard— L os A n g e le s C ity S c h o o ls
Form 34-H-52—400M—3-40
OX
O
87
19
F IR ST NAM E
LAST NAME
HR.
g r a d e
AGE
DATE
OF
B IR TH
MO.
YEAR
1
TELEPHONE
R ESID EN C E
f
B U S IN E S S A DD RESS O F PARENT
P A R E N T O R G U A RD IA N
SCHOOL
LAST ATTENDED
___________________________________________________H R
PER.
DAY
DAYS
ROOM
SUBJECT
GRADE
A D V ISE R
TEACHER
1
2
3
!
4
5
f
6
7
8
!
9
PROGRAM
Los A
CARD
ng eles
C it y S c h o o l s
FORM
34-H -53-300M
7-39
88
H. R..
”L,ast N am e
F irst N am e1;
C ou rse
. D ate
I
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SU B JEC T .
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FO R M 3 4 H -40— 55M — 12-38
1
Form 34'H*106— 4500— 3'39
REGISTRATION RECORD
.......................................................................... School
IN STR U C TIO N S
Enter names of all pupils who did not attend this school last semester. Pupils who are new to the school should be given
consecutive file numbers. Pupils who have previously attended this school should be given their old file numbers.
Date
File No.
PUPIL’S NAME
Entered
School
Last Attended
E,
ETR,
ETRS,
Has Pupil
Previously Attended
This School?
ATTENDANCE
1.
Attendance Record
(Form 34-H-9A)
2.
Re-entrance Card
(Form 34-H-49)
3.
Absence Notice
(Form 412)
4.
Request for Investigation
(Form 34-EH-5)
5.
Notice of Absence
(Form 32.69)
6.
Attendance Notice to Parents
(Form 34-EH-I6 )
7.
Request for Home Yisit
(Form 33.127)
a.
Dental Appointment Service
(Form 33.64)
9.
Dental Appointment Service
(Form 33.66)
10.
Exemption from School Attendance
-(’Form 34-EH-21)
LOS ANGELES JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
ATTENDANCE RECORD
Date
Grade
Date
Grade
Date
Grade
M
T
Name
W
Address
F
T
M
j
Telephone
T
W
Parent or Guardian
T
Change o f Address
M
Business Address
W
F
T
T
Boy or G irl
Race
F
M
Date of Birth
Place of Birth
T
W
Pr.
To
Pr.
To
Pr.
To
T
F
H.R.
HJR.
HJR.
RL
AB
Name
PR
y
\o
H
F irst N am e
L ast Nam e
G ra d e
F irst Nam e
L ast N am e
H. R.
G ra d e
H. R.
HA S P E R M IS S IO N T O R E -E N T E R CLASS
D a te of Absence
REA SO N S
D ate of A bsence.......
1. Illness
No. days.......................
From
To
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
From
To
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
2. W e a th e r
3. U rg e n t N ecessity
4. Office Excuse
5. U n satisfacto ry
,_Reason of A bsence
P u p ils ; m u st h a v e reverse of this c ard signed by each recitatio n tea ch e r upon
re -e n terin g class, and filed w ith adviser.
Form 34-H-49— 250M— 5-40
F orm 412
ABSENCE NOTICE
L ast nam e
F irst nam e
J
.......................... Period............. C. R ..........................
Bate___________
(
j
Teacher
.
F o rm 412
(
ABSENCE NOTICE
Last nam e
F irst name
..........................Period............. C. R..........................
Date.._________ _
Teacher
F orm 412
ABSENCE NOTICE
Last nam e
F irst nam e
..........................Period............. C. R..........................
D ate............................
Teacher
i
|
REQUEST FOR INVESTIGATION
ASSIGNED TO
First Name
SEX
PARENT
ADDRESS
PARENT
RACE
BIR'rH
DATE
AGE
GRADE
PHONE
REPORTED BY
ADDRESS
15. NO LEGAL GUARDIAN
REASO N FOR REQUEST— Circle Number Indicating Request
1. ABSENT
5. FOUND
2. TRUANT
6. WK. PERMIT
9. SCH. PLACEMENT
12. ANNOYED OR
AFTER CUSTODY
ASSAULTED
3. NOT ENROLLED
7. TRANSFER
10. MISCONDUCT
13. EXCL. OR SUSP.
18. INFORMATION—SERVICE
4. HAB. TARDY
8. LONG ILL.
11. SCH. EQUIP. HELD
14. FINAN. OR MAT. AID
19. TAKE TO W.C., SP., ETC.
16. ILLEGAL MARRIAGE
17. PARENTAL ABUSE—NEGLECT
13. PROPERTY RECOVERED
8. UNABLE TO LOCATE
14. CHARGES NOT PROVED
19. REFER TO OTHER SUPERV.
3. PARENT KEPT OUT
9. LEFT NOTICE, BK. IN SCH.
15. BK. AFTER EXCL. OR SUSP. 20. ADJ. AFTER CONFERENCE
OR SCHOOL DIVISION
4. VOLUNT. BK. IN SCH.
10. ILL. OR DEATH IN FAMILY
16. AID GIVEN
21. INFORM. OR SERV. GIVEN
5. HEALTH EXEMPTION
11. INCORRECTLY RPT. ABS.
17. LEGALLY EXCUSED
22. INCOMPLETE
6. PUPIL ACCOUNTING
12. TARDY
18. REFER TO OTHER AGENCY 23. TAKEN TO W.C., SP., ETC.
OTHER
7. MOVED OUT OF JURIS.
2. ILLNESS, BACK IN SCH.
USE
FINDINGS AND DISPOSITION
1. TRUANT, BACK IN SCH,
SIDE
FOR
REMARKS:
REMARKS
ADDRESS
DATES
SCHOOL NO.
SCHOOL
Last Name
FURTHER
NAME
REMARKS:
SIGNED
......................... ....................................................................... Supervisor of Attendance
ATTENDANCE AND EMPLOYMENT OF MINORS SECTION
DIVISION OF SERVICE
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOLS
888 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUILDING
Form 34-EH-5—400M—8-40
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
ATTENDANCE AND EMPLOYMENT OF MINORS SECTION
NOTICE OF ABSENCE
Date................................... ...................
Mr.
Mrs...........................................................................................................................................................................................................
son
tardy
According to School Records, your daughter,.................................................................................. , has been absent
to
from...................................................................... School on the following dates:........................................................................
(Please use the reverse side explaining reason for absence or tardiness and mail to) :
Registrar
............................................................ Vice-Principal.................................
..School...............................
Principal
Address
Supervisor of Attendance
CALIFORNIA SCHOOL LAW
Compulsory Education—Ages 8-16:
Each parent, guardian or other person having control of any child between the ages of 8 and 1 6 . . . . shall be required
to send such child to the public full time day school for the full time the public schools are in session.
Enforcement of Compulsory Continuation Education—Ages 16-18:
Each parent, guardian or other person having control of any minor required . . . . to attend special continuation classes
must compel the attendance of such minor upon same.
Penalties:
Should any parent or guardian or other person having control of any minor . . . . fail to perform any of the duties im­
posed upon him . . . . he shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor. First offense, not more than $10 or 5 day imprisonment.
Second offense, from $10 to $50 or imprisonment from 5 to 25 days.
32.69— (Revised)—20M—10-36
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOLS
ATTENDANCE NOTICE TO PARENTS
School............................... ..................................... . Date...............
Mr.............................................................................. :
Your attention is called to the fact that....................................
is irregular in the matter of attendance as fo llo w s:
Tardiness............................................................................................
Absence.............................................................................. ................
Remarks..............................................................................................
Parents please answer
on back of this card.
..............................
Principal
Form 34-EH-16— 100M— 9-37
Three unexcused absences or tardinesses constitute a truancy.
A pupil is tardy if not in his room when classes begin.
Teachers are authorized to require satisfactory explanation from
parents in all cases of absence or tardiness.
Please state cause of absence or tardiness, sign and return this card
to the school.
Signature of Parent
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
D iv is io n of S ervice — H e a l t h S ervice S e c t io n
REQUEST FOR HOME V IS IT
Date...........................................................
Room
Teacher
Name of Child
Grade
Address
Absent
Reported Reason for Absence
Result of Investigation
Date
Form 33.64— 25M— 1-41
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
DENTAL APPOINTMENT SERVICE
Date
To the Principal:
a
grade
(Pupil’s name)
School
Pupil of.
arrived at my office.
for treatment and left at
time
time
Remarks:
., D.D.S.
(Signed)
(Address)
(OVER)
(Telephone)
To the Dentist:
This form completely filled out and signed by you is re­
turned by the child immediately to the principal of h is school.
By this procedure only will full credit for the child's attend­
ance be granted when computing average daily attendance,
authorized by Section 4.769-5 of the School Code of the State
of California.
To the Principal:
A t the end of each calendar month this form for which
excuse was granted will be sent in to Dental Unit Headquart­
ers, room 810 Chamber of Commerce Building.
Note: This blue slip is to be used only for children— kinder­
garten thru the 8th grade inclusive.
99
Form 33.66— 20M— 11-39
LOS ANGELES CITY SECONDARY SCHOOLS
DENTAL APPOINTMENT SERVICE
Date..................................
_.
To the Principal:
.....................................................
Pupil of
......
arrived at my office ............
-.
a......... ............................grade
School
.for treatment andleft at........ ..............-
(time)
(time)
Remarks:................ ................................................................................................
(Signed)
..................
(Address)
, D.D.S.
(Over)
(Telephone)
To the D entist:
This form completely filled out and signed by you is returned
' by the pupil immediately to the pincipal or director of the school.
To the Principal:
At the end of each calendar month this form will be sent to
Dehtal Unit Headquarters, room 806 Chamber of Commerce Building.
Form 34-EH-21— 12% M Sets— 12-38
RECOMMENDATION FOR EXEMPTION FROM SCHOOL ATTENDANCE
Because of Physical Condition
Date.................................................................
Child’s Name...;....................................................................................Birthdate..................................... Male................. Female........ ........
Child’s Address....................................................................................School..................................................................... Grade...................
Parent’s Name..................................
Address......................................................... Phone........................... .
As provided under Paragraph 1.141, of the California School Code, I recommend that the above-named child be ex­
empted from full-time school, attendance for a period of
days because of the physical condition described below:
In your opinion, could this child attend school a fraction of the school day?.................... If so, hours per day.....
If
free bus transportation is provided, might he attend a school for physically handicapped children?.................
.. Do you
recommend a home teacher once a week?..................... Is it best for him to refrain from all physical activity?
Signed.............................................................................
APPROVED BY:. ..................................... :................................... Address............................................................................
Supervisor of Attendance
m,
'
Telephone......................................................................
Make in triplicate, Doctor retains white copy, mail original and duplicate copies to the school.
I recommend that the above child be exempted from school attendance until.......................................................
School Physician.............. ............................................
NOTE: If name of school is not given, mail original and duplicate to Attendance & Employment of Minors Section, Los
Angeles City Schools, 888 Chamber of Commerce Building.
100
101
REGULAR ATTENDANCE REPORTS
1*
Class Enrollment Blank
(Form 34-H-42)
2.
Classification Report
(Form 51.2)
3.
Statistical Report
(Form 51.5)
4.
Eight Months Proof Sheet
(Form 51.13)
5.
Duplicate Attendance Record for NonResidents (Seventh and Eighth Grade)
(Form 51.10)
6.
Report of Non-Resident Pupils (Elementary)
(Form 43.11)
7.
Report of Non-Resident Pupils (Junior and High)
(Form 43.13)
19.
G rad e...........................................................
E n rolled
H o m e ro o m .................................................
in
N o . of S eats............................................
PERIOD
SUBJECTS
H o m ero o m
GRADE
ROOM
Boys......................
G irls.................................
T o ta l..................... ...........
NO. OF
SEATS
ENROLLED
PRESENT
I
IX
in
IV
V
VI
V II
vm
IX
X
.................................................................................................T ea c h er
CLASS E N R O L L M E N T B LA N K
Form 34-H-42— 135M — 2-39
FORM S t . 2 SM 8 - 3 8
A LPH A B ET IC A L
To be made in triplicate.
O RIGINAL to be sent to the Statistical Office.
D U PL IC A T E to be sent to the A sst. Supt. in charge of school.
T R IPLIC A TE to be retained by Principal.
A SSISTA N T
D IST R IC T
N o ----------------------------------------------
103
S U P E R I N T E N D E N T ______________________________
D A T E __________________________________________
L O S A N G E L E S CITY HIGH SC H O O L DISTRIC T
STATISTICAL OFFICE
JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL CLASSIFICATION REPORT
N U M B E R O F P U P I L S E N R O L L E D IN C L A S S E S A ND G R A D E S
The enrollment on the Classification Report is the “number belonging” and should include those
pupils actually attending on the day of the report and those absent but expected to return.
B7
A7
B8
A8
A9
B9
A10
BIO
B ll
B12
A ll
A12
Special
Compulsory
Continua­
tion
Boys
...................-
------
.... — —
■— —
------
- ----------
.
■.
---- ...„ —
.......-
--
..—
Girls
TOTALS
Number of CERTIFICATED EMPLOYEES (individuals) in your school________________________________ _________
(Include Principal, Vice-Principal, etc.)
Number of CERTIFICATED FULL TIME POSITIONS in your school_____________________________ ___________
(Include Principal, Vice-Principal, etc.)
Number of Vice-Principals.
Number of Supervisory Visits Made by Principal to Classrooms____________By Vice-Principal (Boys)__________ (Girls)__________
(The only v isits to be recorded are those made (1) To supervise and pass on quality of instruction. (2) To assist the teacher with constructive criticism
and helpful suggestions. The record of such visits to teachers not fully satisfactory should be kept in a permanent file for future reference. Particulars
as to date, observations made and advice given should be recorded.)
Number of Times Fire Drill Was Held__________________________________________
(A t least one fire drill should be held during the month)
PR IN C IP A L ’S
NA M E
SIGN A TU R E.
O F SCHOOL_______
..
-
--
TOTALS
P6RM 5 1 . 5
5M
8-40
L O S A N G E L E S CITY HIGH SC H O O L DISTRICT
To be made in duplicate.
ORIGINAL to be sent to the Statistical Office of the Budget Division.
DUPLICATE to be retained by P rincipal.
(C onsult “ C alendar of Reports B ulletin” for dates reports are to be
subm itted.)
^
1
7
J u n io r
2
,!
3
f-—
and
-■t--'■r ■— "
"
GRADES
| TOTA L D A Y S'
i! N O T E N R O L L E D
TO TA L D A Y S'
ABSENCE
TOTAL DAY S’
ATTENDANCE
AVERAGE
D A IL Y
ATTENDANCE
f
E PU PILS
BOYS
to
S
p e c
.,
In
• '
10
(
G IRLS
ETRS
1
BOYS
PU PIL S
G IR L S
.
.
_
. .
\
11
12
1
,
TOTAL
E AND ETRS PU PILS
N U M B ER ON R EG ISTER
E X C L U D I N G D U PLIC A TES
1'
BOYS
G IR LS
3 0 YS
• ; -
-— -
G IRLS
4-
-
TOTAL
A-
7TH
IU
-
th
'
1|
I
TOTAL— 7
is— 104
SC H O O L M ONTH EN D IN G -
9
S-
'•
D IST R IC T NO.
.^
I
3
6
L egal
, H o lid a y s 1
H o lid a y s
D e c la re d ' N um ber
il a n d D ay s.; b y S c h o o l! o f D ay s
a t I n s tit u te A u th o r itie s T a u g h t
A LPH A BETICA L
BUDGET DIVISION
S e n i o r H ig h S c h o o l S t a t i s t i c a l R e p o r t
c l u siv e
9TH
|1 ,,TH 4
I'
12TH
I
i it
TOTAL— 9
th
to
S
p e c
.,
In
c l u siv e
ft
1 I
C o m p u l s o r y ?|
C ontinuation
If
I
S
-
TOTAL— 9
r
th
to O th er
In c l u s iv e
S
p e c
.
O ther
p e c . D ay
ft--
=--4=*
- ................
D ay,
______
4
...... !
-t
it
i
i
ii.
f
--—
....... L
...
GRAND TOTAL FO R S C H O O L
— .
13.
“ E T R " AND
“ LTR"
T - T '‘
“ R " P U P I L S R E C E IV E D F R O M O T H E R S C H O O L S T H I S M O N T H -
P U P IL S T R A N S F E R R E D TO O T H E R S C H O O L S T H IS
M O N T H ---------------
1 4 . P E R C E N T O F A T T E N D A N C E T H IS M O N T H LOW PERC EN TA G E
"L ”
(9 0 %
OR L E S S )
- % f (A )
WAS DUE TO:
J (B)
E P ID E M IC
(S T A T E
BAD W E A T H E R -
T Y P E )-(C )
T R A N S IE N T P O P U L A T I O N -
P U P I L S W H O L E F T T H I S M O N T H .............................................................. .............................
(D )
OTHER
REASONS-
( S E E IN S T R U C T IO N S ON R E V E R S E S ID E O F BLA N K )
SCHOOL
R E G IS T R A R O R A T T E N D A N C E T E A C H E R R E S P O N S I B L E F O R R E P O R T
F o r m 51.13— 1M— 4-38
LOS ANGELES CITY HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT
J U N IO R H IG H SC H O O L . P R IN C IP A L ’S EIG H T M O N T H S P R O O F S H E E T
105
For the School Tear Ending June 30, 1 9 3 _____
Eight Months P roof Sheets w ill be checked and
returned to schools in order that data fo r 9th
and 10th months m ay be added.
File w ith A nnual State Report at close o f school year.
N ote:
School
Month
Legal
Holidays
and Days at
Institute
Holidays
Declared
by School
Authorities
SCHOOL
P R IN C IP A L /T E A C H E R
T otal D ays A tten d a n ce
Number
of Days
Taught
(240 Minutes Equal 1 Day)
A— Grades 7 and 8
Whole Number
B— Grades 9*
Decimal
Whole Number
Decimal
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Sixth
Seventh
Eighth
TOTAL
Ninth
Tenth
TOTAL
5
6
S ta te E n rollm en t by M onths— E . S tu d en ts O nly
C ity E n ro llm en t by M onths— E. and E T R S. S tu d en ts
Month
7th Grade
Boys
Girls
8th Grade
Boys
Girls
*9th Grade
Boys
Girls
Month
1st Mo.
1st Mo.
2nd Mo.
2nd Mo.
3rd Mo.
3rd Mo.
4th Mo.
4th Mo.
5th Mo.
5th Mo.
6th Mo.
6th Mo.
7th Mo.
7th Mo.
8th Mo.
8th Mo.
TOTAL
TOTAL
9th Mo.
9th Mo.
10th Mo.
10th Mo.
Grand Total
*£ix year high schools include 9th g ade on senior high school blank (Form 51.14)
Grand Total
7th Grade
Boys
Girls
8th Grade
Boys
Girls
*9th Grade
Boys
Girls
LOS ANGELES CITY SC H O O L DISTRICT
form 5t,o— 500-12-39
BUDGET DIVISION
DUPLICATE ATTENDANCE RECORD FOR 7TH AND 8TH GRADE NON-RESIDENT HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS
Name of School______________________________________District of Residence-------------------------------------------Name of Pupil--------------------------------------------- ---------------------
Boy;------------------ G irl-------
3
Address — ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Period of Residence Outside of Los Angeles City High School District During Current School Year:
From——--------------------------------------------------------------------- - To----------------------------------------------------------------E, Etr, Etrs (Circle)
Month
M
T W
TH F
Grade
M
T W
TH
F
M
(1st Semester) (Grade 2nd Semester)--------------
T
W
TH
F M
T
w
TH
F
DAYS
TAUGHT
DAYS N O T
ENROLLED
DAYS
ABSENT
DAYS
ATTENDANCE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
REM[ARKS
TOTAL
106
LOS ANGELES CITY HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT
E d u c a t i o n a l H o u s in g S e c t io n
REPORT OF NON-RESIDENT
L. A. CITY (ELEMENTARY) SCHOOL DISTRICT PUPILS
IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
107
.................................................................................
School
.................................................................................... Principal
Los Angeles, California,..................
, 194........
eport of seventh and eighth grade junior high school pupils with legal residence outside Los Angeles City
Elementary School District:
NAME
G RA D E
LEGAL RESIDENCE
SCHOOL DISTRICT
OF RESIDENCE
PERIOD OF
NON-RESIDENT A T T ENDANCE
Beginning Date
Ending Date
*
ate: A complete report of out-of-district pupils m ust be filed at the beginning of each sem ester. Supplem ental reports should be filed
iately for such pupils subsequently enrolling or w ithdraw ing during a sem ester.
LOS ANGELES CITY HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT
E d u c a t io n a l H o u s in g S e c t io n
108
REPORT OF NON-RESIDENT
L. A. CITY HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT PUPILS
COMPLETE AND RETURN TQrlN JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
PAUL J. P /M A H O N , C oord inator \
L. A. CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION
School
1 3 CH AM BER CF COM M ERCE BLDG.
LOS A N G E LES, CALIF.
/ x
.Principal
,194.
Los Angeles, California,..............................................................
eport of ninth to tw elfth grade junior and senior high school pupils with legal residence outside Los Angeles
City High School D istrict:
NAM E
GRADE
L E G A L R E S ID E N C E
H IG H SC H O O L
D IS T R IC T
O F R E S ID E N C E
P E R IO D O F
N O N -R E S I D E N T A T T E N D A N C E
Beginning Date
E n d in g D a te
5te: A complete report of out-of-district pupils m ust be filed at the beginning of each sem ester. Supplem ental reports should be filed
lately for such pupils subsequently enrolling or withdrawing during a sem ester?
109
PERMITS USED WITHIN THE SCHOOL '
1.
Excuse to Go Home
(Form 34-H-43)
2.
Offiee Excuse
(Form 34-H-45)
3#
Office Summons
(Form 34-H-4 6 )
4.
Permit
(Form 34-H-47)
5.
Permit to Leave Room
(Form 34-H-48)
6*
Tardy Excused
(Form 34-H-59)
7.
Tardy Not Excused
(Form 34-H-60)
H.R.
L a st N a m e
F ir st N a m e
I d e sir e t o b e e x c u s e d a t ............. -..............................
(tim e)
o n a c c o u n t o f ...................................................................
D ate......................................... ..................................... ................... ..........................
Allowed
-..................................................................................-.Vice Principal
...................
E X C U SE
P arent
T O
G O
H O M E
F o r m 34-H - 43—200M—2-40
ill
112
..............
.Hoorn:..........................
at once
Please report to me
during.................................
.....period
at close of.................................................... .*1......... period,
Date.
'Signature
L eft office ait............................ 1.?...-....................... ..............................................
o’clock,t,,* * - 1.
„
*s
P
t ‘ *’»'* i
”-'*L
/,
%
i>
<
'
,i •-•■>. .•-.* .'
'
V
.
it
........; * V "
*
-4’
4 V* ’/'
.""jf&rtl
'■Form '34-H i46^600M — 3-40f % ^
Jl _
)|Vf*
:■'
1* ‘1
O^EICE^S U<jyei^NS
* .
J
*.
113
L ast N am e
of H. R.
......
F ir st N am e
has permission to
................ - .........1 9 .............................................................................................
PERMIT
Sign atu re
Form 34-H-47— 37EM— 2-39
114
L ast N am e
F irst Nam e
has permission to go to.................................................
Date..—................................. - Time
...............o’clock
(The permit to be retained by the teacher for checking.)
PERMIT TO LEAVE ROOM
L ast N am e
F irst N am e
Date..........................................Time..................... o’clock
Issued by..........................................................................
Teacher.
Received by................................-L e ft.................o’clock
Teacher or S. G.
(This duplicate must be returned by the student to
the teacher who issued it.)
PERMIT TO LEAVE ROOM
Form 34-H-48 400M—7-39
Home Room.................
T A R D Y — EXCUSED
L ast N am e
D ate......................................
F ir s t N a m e
Time................
S ig n a tu r e
F o r m 3 4 -H -5 9 — 300M — 10-38
116
Date
- -’
'■
-
TARDYr—NOT EXCUSED
' Sign atu re
Form 34-H-60— 400M—5-40
PERMIT REQUEST TO ATTEND A JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OTHER THAN THIS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
1*
Permit Notice
(Form 34-AEH-l)
2.
Request Tor Permit
(Form 43*6)
FORM 3 4 - AEH -1 ---- 60 M S E T S — 1 2 - 3 8
To be made out in triplicate, original
to be sent with pupil, duplicate to -be
forwarded to Asst. Supt. in charge of
issuing school, triplicate to be re'
tained by principal. THIS PERMIT
DOES NOT TAKE THE PLACE
OF Form 34'EH'3, Pupil Accounting
Report.
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
Original
PERMIT NOTICE
( T o be sen t w ith th e 1p u p il)
Los Angeles, California,
........... 19...
To Principal of
...........................................................................
...School
........................................................... A ge............................. ;
Grade
Residing at............................................................. ..................................................................
is hereby granted a permit to attend your school for the present semester for the following reasons:
This permit should be kept on file
for one year, by receiving principal.
..............................Superintendent/Principal
School
118
LOS ANGELES CITY HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT
EDUCATIONAL HOUSING SECTION
REQUEST FOR PERMIT
119
To
A ttend Ju n io r or Senior H igh Schools
Outside L. A. City H igh School D istrict
Date.
Pupil’s Name.
Age.
Date of Birth
Present Address.
Father’s Name
Phone.
..................................
His Permanent Address
Mother’s Name
_........................ _..................... _................................. ..........
............................................. ........ ...........
..................................................
..............................................................................................................................................................
Her Permanent Address..—
......................................... ............ ........................................... .......................................
Name of Legal Guardian, if any....................... .............................................................. .................................................
His or her permanent address................................................. ............... ........... .................................................. ...........
If parents are divorced, was any court order made
assigning you to the custody of your mother
.......................................................................................... .............
I wish to attend----------------------------------------------------------School District
which is located in................
School attended last sem ester....
....
„........... ...........................................................................
If you have recently moved into Los Angeles City
High School District, give date you moved
- --Reasons for requesting permit
G rade..........................
-..................... - .......................................
..................................................................
Signature
___
DO NOT WRITE BELOW THIS LINE
120
PERMITS FOR WORKING
1.
Saturday and Vacation Work Permit Card
(Form B.8)
2.
Supplementary Information Blank for Work
Permit
(Form B-2)
3.
Request
for Permission t o Apply for Work
Permit
(Form 34-H-19)
121
Calii. State Dept, oi Education
Form No. B8
IDENTIFICATION a n d ‘PERMIT CARD
(Saturday an d V acation O nly)
N a m e...............................................................
«u
S e x ......
D ate of
B irth................................... ..........School.
Issu ed
Issu ed By
E xpires
P o sitio n
* N O T LEGAL IN IN D U ST R IES SU B JE C T TO T H E
FA IR LABOR STA N D A R D S A C T OF 1 9 3 8 .
M inors m a y hot w ork before five a.m . or . after ten p.m.
The total n u m b er of hours of school a n d w ork m a y not exceed
eig h t h o u rs in a n y one d a y or forty-eight hours in one w eek.
A ll occupations d an g e ro u s to life a n d lim b or injurious to
h e a lth or m orals a re d e c la red u n law ful for minors u n d er 16,
according to Section 4 of the Child Labor Law.
S ignature of Minor.
F orm 34-EH-19 20M 3-40
Calif. State Dept, of .Education.
Form No. B-2
Date------.......... -......
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION
To B e F ille d in a s F o llo w s arid in the
II—STATEM ENT OF EMPLOYMENT
O rd e r'In d ic a te d B elow
I—By th e p a re n t (see over)
II—By p ro sp ectiv e em p lo y er
III—-By School A tte n d a n c e Office
IV—(B ring to. 890 C. o f C. Bidg.)
V—By school D o cto r w h en req u ire d
---............. -.....--
To the Superintendent of Schools:
I intend to employ............................................................................................... Address........ !..........
..
He/She will be required to work as (kind of work)...........................................................
Between the hours
each day
a.m. to
a.m. and................................ p.m..to.........................
He will use street car, bicycle, auto, truck in his work.....
Number of hours on Saturday
He attends regular school daily from..
Number of hours on Sunday...
____
Firm Name.................................................................................
Address.......................
...to.
Phone............
.Signed............. ................................... ............
Name of M inor.................. ..... ....................... .
Address of Minor
MO.
Ill—SCHOOL RECORD
.......T.......... ..........................
GRADE COMPLETED
AGE
DATE OF BIRTH
YEAR
D AY
,.........
This OUTSIDE of School Hours
Blank is to be given to the child
by his school principal. '
HOURS TO BE IN SCHOOL '
From
To
SCHOOL WORK
Satisfactory
| Unsatisfactory
ATTENDA NC E
Regular
|
Irregular
(Signed)..
Date.................... ............. .......................
Attendance and Em ployment of Minors Section
Los Angeles C ity Schools Form 32.26—5M—8-39
School.
m fe H E -te T H ^CERTIFICATE •*;
*
pirn.
I certify t*hat I*have,examiried....A...^„.v.^....~.':..*y...':.'..._ .. .... _
and fmxl'fhis5*??)nS.??$>h a s indicated beiow:
„
i.*
Date.
>J* ‘' - Ra’ce
i -*ik mtt r
Color Eyes Color Hair
Height
W e ig h t ;
■' '1
vvt-'iii
>-D efective C o n d itio n
.xcivso
{•Itb
p o sitiv e
a w t r
N e g a t i v e *>t
I reco m m en d th e fo llo w irig ^o ^rectiv en treatm eh t: *
■ oj-j'o*- ;
....................
- ? - v r h h f;.
•Eyes
.
•Ears
Nose
. -.......... .
1WV* V i ........
:.iV:
Heart
8v n
ru x .-'w :
*-1--
T' ,v i.5 J <*>» $: i m
‘
*
* ' ✓
>
>
,*
... In m y o p in io n h e /sh e m a y rio t u n d e rta k e th e w o rk described
n
n a n - !
G?.
v ife h T o
.KT
Lungs
>7rf.**” *7
:>
1-
Throat
•Teeth
i£
Abdomen
!
Belifevfe*tBis^w ork should^Fe^carrifed o n 1w ith th e follow ing
re stric tio n s:
<■
(> P e rm it lim ited to .................
dayc
.........L hours.......................
#i a
N u tr itio n ..............
N erv o u slS y stem . Xa .TCllT. .1’., A:■
-.eifft
■ff'&VfSS
At «
O rth o p ed ic D efeats..:.,..;......:,...
i
*
/£ • i‘ H ii It M y o p ih io n .is based. u p o n .........1.......................7. . ' . . : :
,
_______ __________
M a tu rity A p p a re n tly A ttain ed : Yes..:..........
1.
/
R eco rd of p rev io u s ex a m in a tio n given.........,.y..i
/
N o.
VJ‘
REM A RK S:
2.
__________ (If p o sitiv e s ta te d efectiv e co n d itio n )
Month'
Day
Year
E x a m in a tio n m ad e th is d ate.
(S ig n ed ............................1..................
M D.1
I—STATEM ENT OF PARENT
Said minor is being employed with my full knowledge and consent.
D a te --
Signature of Parent or Guardian
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR PERMISSION TO APPLY FOR WORK PERMIT
.................................................., .........................., ....................., School...........................................................................
Name of Minor
Birthdate
Grade
has permission to apply for a work permit.
I recommend that the above named minor be assigned to Continuation School when employment is
secured.
I hereby consent to this request.
Signed.....................;.......................................................
Principal
Signed.............................................................................
Parent or Guardian
Per................................... Date.............................................
(Note:— It is preferable for Parent or Guardian to come to school for an interview before a minor is
given this form. In such case parent or guardian shall sign on the line above. If this is impossible it will
be necessary for the Attendance and Employment of Minors Section to secure the parent’s signature.
Child is not to be released from school until he or she presents Promise of Employment blank properly
filled out. It is suggested that during periods of unemployment, economic need be the major factor con­
sidered in recommending the issuance of permits.)
Minor to bring Original to 890 Chamber of Commerce Building, 12th and Broadway.
Los Angeles City Schools— Form 34-H-19— 7500 Sets— 10-38
REPORTS FOR STUDENTS SENT TO THE PROBATION OFFICER
ORSTO SPECIAL SCHOOLS
1.
Social History Folder
(Form 32.48)
2.
Special Report to Probation Officer
(Form 32.77)
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
DIVISION OF SERVICE
ATTENDANCE AND EMPLOYMENT OF MINORS SECTION
12^
SOCIAL HISTORY FOLDER
N am e......................... ...........................................
.Address...................................
.D ate...
School................................... -..... -.......................
..A ge........................Birthdate.
. Grade.
Father.................................................................. .
..Address...................................
..Tel......
Mother..................................................................
..Address...................................
..Tel......
Mother’s Maiden N am e..................................
..Guardian.................................
.Tel......
Business Address o f P arent or Guardian.
..Tel......
Problem..........................................
R eferred to....................................
.Asst. Supvr. of A ttendance......
Other Schools A ttended in L. A .? 1........
2...................................... 3.
Private School or Institution A ttended.....
Fam ily
Father
Country
o f Birth
Race
Years
in U.S.
Speaks
English
Citizenship
Mother
Living
Yes | No
Religion
1
Subject
Current Year— ATTENDANCE— P ast Y ear
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Total
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Total
1
D ays Present
j
A bsent (Excused)
|
l
A bsent (Illeg a l)
|
1
I
R esults of Intelligence Tests
Name o f T est
Date
Place Given
By Whom
C.A.
M.A.
I.Q.
S ta tem en t o f P roblem : Give N ature o f difficulty, causal factors, immediate cause o f transfer, home conditions, and other
facts pertinent to the case.
RECOM MENDATION:
Form
3 2 .4 8 — 5M — 8 -3 8
Principal
PHYSIOLOGICAL FINDINGS
Place
Date
Age
W eight
H eight
COM MENDATION:
PSYCHOLOGICAL FINDINGS
Name o f Test
Date Given
Place Given
Given by
M ental A ge
Chron. Age
1
Analysis of B inet:
C O M M ENDATIO N:
I.Q.
1
rm 32.77— 30M — 9-37
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOLS
SCHOOL REPORT TO PROBATION OFFICER
126
R E :........................................................................................... No
............ Probation Officer.
ibdivision No............................................................................. Hearing Date..........................................
)me Address...............................................................................Present Location...................................
hool................................................................. ............................ Grade................. Birthdate..................
[TEN DA N C E:
onths (School)
lys Present
jsent (Excused)
>sent (Illegal)
Sept. I Oct.
Nov.
Dec. I Jan.
Mar.
Feb.
Age.
Apr. | May | June |
Total
ite of Entrance in School present school year:.............................................
CMA R K S: (If child is attendance problem, state to what extent, etc.)
Intelligence And Other Tests
Kind
Date
Examiner
G. A.
M.A.
I.Q.
Gr. PI.
bjects taken and grades received:
5HAVIOR AND PERSONALITY TRAITS: (Indicate temperament and character, social attitudes, type of
companions, etc.)
3MEDIAL MEASURES ATTEMPTED:
JHOOL AND HOME RELATIONSHIPS: (State if any contact with home, parents cooperative or antagonis­
tic, broken home, general characteristics of home, etc.)
s soon as informed that pupil has been filed on,
ike out this form completely in triplicate and have
idy for the Probation Officer when he or she calls
SIGNED
your school.
(Use back for additional information)
P r in c ip a l or V ic e - P r in c ip a l
TRANSFERRING AWAY FROM THIS SCHOOL
1.
Clearance Card
(Form 34-H-16)
Zm
Pupil Accounting Report
(Form 34-H-3)
............................................................................................................................................ is transferring to ©
SCHOLARSHIP RECORD
....................................................................................................School..................................................... :...19____ I
New Address.—........................................................... .................................................................................................
1. Permission to leave
—Principal
2. Your signature indicates that you have dropped this student from your roll, and that he is
clear of all responsibility for school property.
Per.
I
II
Room
SUBJECT
Grade
Mark
TEACHER
S
o
I
I
Student
Grade
This is to be filled out in ink by the recitation teachers
and taken by the pupil to the school which he intends
to enter.
week,......................... Semester
Standing a t end of........
Year: 19______ 19_____
SUBJECT
Grade Mark
III
IY
V
VI
..................................................................
3
Counselor
8. Locker Keys Returned.....................................
4
................................................................
Librarian
9. Gym Equipment Returned.............................
..............................................................
5
Text Books
10.............................................................................
................................................................
6
Homeroom
11.................................................................................
................................................................
Registrar
7
12. Received Transfer............................................
..School
Los Angeles, California
Principal
Student
CLEARANCE CARD
......................................................................... School
Form 34-H-16—SOM—7-39
Per..
128
PUPIL ACCOUNTING REPORT
Room.
Family name of child
Given Name
Phone
Old Address
| Born, Mo.-Day-Yr.
1
Date last attended
| Age | Boy | Girl | Race | *Grade
New Address
Parent or Guardian
The pupil named above is hereby
released from this school to attend
Signed.
Phone
.School
______________________________________________________________________
Principal or R egistrar
School releasing pupil
Date.
NOTE: This form is to be given to every pupil leaving your school for any other school whatsoever. It is to be used when promoting
pupils to a school of higher grade at the close of a semester. *At term end indicate grade to which pupil is being promoted.
(Carbon copy may be made for your files.)
Form 34-EH-3—250M—12-38
Revised 10-1933
LOS ANGELES CITY SCHOOLS
Los Angeles, California
129
APPENDIX B
REVISED AND NEW FORMS
APPENDIX B
1.
Attendance Record
2.
File Card
3.
Cumulative Envelope
4.
Permission to Re-enter Glass
5.
Master Absence Sheet
6.
Form to help compile information for the
Statistical Report (Statistical Work
Sheet).
7.
Hall Pass
8.
Record Blank for Teachers* Home Visits
9.
The Technique of an Interview
10.
Program Card
11.
Registration Record
12.
Statistical Report
FORM
34-H -3A
LOS A N G E L E S JUNIOR A N D SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
100M
A T T E N D A N C E RECORD
Date
Name
Grade
Date
Grade
Date
Grade
W
Address
Telephone
W
Parent or Guardian
Change of Address
Business Address
W
Boy or Girl
Race
Date of Birth
Pr.
HJR.
To
Place of Birth
Pr.
To
Pr.
To
RL
AB
Name
PR
132
133
REVERSE SIDE OF ATTENDANCE RECORD CARD
Nam©
Date
M
T
W
T
F
M
T
W
T
F
Class of
Date of Birth
Par en t s T Name
Date Entered
Date Left
Transfered to
Graduate, Yes
No
M.
T
W
T
F
Winter
Comments
Summer
M
T
W
T
F
RL
kB
PR
Grade
-
Date
Grade
Date
Grade
134
FILE CARD
__________F i l e N o .
Name
FIR ST NAM E
D A T E O F B I R T H ________________
P A R E N T ’S
N A M E ______________
D A T E E N T E R E D ________________
D A T E L E F T _______________________
T R A N S F E R R E D T O ____________
KERN A VE NU E J U N I O R HIGH
2M
K -100
©*3 9
The file card contains the information usually re­
quested by other schools.
use.
The size is very convenient for
Other information may be obtained from the cumulative
envelope.
135
PERMISSION TO RE-ENTER CLASS
F ir s t N a m e
L a st N a m e
G rade
F ir s t N a m e
L a st N a m e
H .R .
G rade
H . R.
H A S P E R M IS S IO N
D a te o f A b sen ce
TO
R E -E N T E R C L A S S
REASO NS
D a t e o f A b s e n c e .........
1. . I lln e s s
1
N o . d a y s .....................
F ro m
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
'
From
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
To
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
i
To
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
!
..._ R ea so n o f A b s e n c e
I
i
P u p ils m u s t h a v e
r e v e r s e o f th is c a r d
s ig n e d
by e a c h
2.
W e a th e r
3.
U r g e n t N e c e s s ity
4.
O ffice E x c u se
5.
U n s a tis fa c to r y
r e c ita tio n t e a c h e r up on
r e - e n te r in g c la ss , a n d file d w ith a d v is e r .
Form 34-H-49— 25OM— 5-40
Revised Form
Last Name
First Name
Grade
H.R.
Date of Absence
to
Period H.R. 123456 Days_
Period H.R. 123456
Date of Birth
Parent
Address
Phone
Last Name
First Name
Grade
e 7R.
REASONS
1 Illness
Date of Absence
to__
2 Weather
3 Urgent
Period H.R. 123456 Days_
Necessity
4 Office
Period H.R. 123456 Days_
Excuse
5.Unsatisfactory
Pupils must have reverse of this
card signed by each recitation
teacher upon re-entering class,
and filed with adviser.
NOTE: The regular form used at present is at the top and the re­
vised form is below. The left side of the card has all of
■.the information necessary to make out the Request for Inves­
tigation (Form 34-EH-5), which saves looking at the Attend­
ance Record or some other source for this information. The
right side of the card has the same information as before
except that the reasons are transposed so that the numbers
are on the left side of the perforation. When a child re­
turns from an absence a line may be drawn through the number
and the reason at one motion instead of marking in two
places.
137
DAILY MASTER ABSENCE SHEET
Date_
Today’s Absentees
Jones, John
Titus, James
Previous
Today’s Absentees
3 Allen, ?/. Davis, Grace
5 Smith, L. Moore, Bernice
Palmer, Jessie
Previous
6 Price, H.
NOTE: Home room will make out an absence card (Form 34H-49), on the first day only for those absent from Home room
and will send it to the Attendance Office at the close of
Home room.
First Period teachers will see than an absence notice
is placed in the clip at the door with the names of those ab­
sent from that class during the first ten minutes of the class
period.
At the close of period one or at the beginning of period
two an alphabetized MASTER ABSENCE SHEET will be sent to each
teacher. If a pupil whose name is not on this master sheet is
absent from any class, a white absence slip for that pupil
should be sent to the attendance office. If a pupil whose name
is on the master sheet is present, the pupil should be sent to
the attendance office at once, unless this pupil has a Permis­
sion to Re-enter Class”TForm 34-H-49).
Absence Notice
L ast N am e
IL
F irst N a m e
Last N am e
c
3
First N am e
Date
D a te_______________________ Period VI
Teacher
Absence Notice
.Period V
____________________________________
.
Absence Notice
L ast N am e
First N am e
J Date______________________
Period IV
Teacher
.T eacher
9000301)
Absence N otice
L ast N am e
First N am e
Absence Notice
L ast N am e
First N am e
Absence Notice
L ast N am e
First N am e
D a t e _______________________ Period III
Date__________
Period II
Date__________________________Period I
____________________ ;_________________________ Teacher
_____________________________________________ T eacher
_________________________________________ Teacher
138
STATISTICAL WORK SHEET
GRADE_______BOYS-GIRLS
No. on Register
STATISTICAL WORK SHEET
GRADE
BOYS-GIRLS
___________ No. on Register________________
Perfect Att.______ ___________ Perfect Att._____ ____________
Not Enrolled________ .
_________ Not Enrolled__________________
Absence
Attendance
E:
___________ __
Absence_________________ _____
_______________ Attendance,____________ _______
Boys______Girls_________ E:
Boys______Girls_________
Etrs: Boys______Girls_________ Etrs: Boys______ Girls___ _____
Etr; Duplicates_______________ Etr. Duplicates________________
No. on Register Excluding
Duplicates: Boys
No. on Register Excluding
Girls______ Duplicates: Boys
Girls_____
NOTE: This form has been devised to help compile the informa­
tion necessary for the STATISTICAL REPORT (Form 51.5). Half
of the form may be used for the boys in one of the half grades.
The other half may be used for the girls in the half grade.
After the information for the entire grade is compiled this
information may be assembled on another half sheet before it
is transmitted to the STATISTICAL REPORT (Form 51*5).
139
HALL PASS
Date
Name
Time Left
Time Returned
NOTE: A five-by-eight card may be mimeographed as the
above is started. This card is held in a metal holder upon
which the teacher’s name is stamped.
When a child leaves the room he fills out most of a
line on this card. The card is left with the teacher and the
metal hall pass is carried by the pupil. This saves on teacher
time. The time returned is completed by the child later and
at times is checked by the teacher. The hall pass may be seen
at a short distance by any other teacher and yet the pass is
large enough so that the pupil cannot hide it very easily.
140
RECORD BLANK
TEACHERS * HOME VISITS
Pupil’s name____________________H.R.
Address_________
Member of family interviewed_______ ____ Date interviewed
Purpose of visit________________________________________
Home conditions
Attitude of parent or guardian
Comments
Name of visiting teacher
NOTE: The above form is filled in after the home visit
has been made. It is suggested that no writing be made dur­
ing the interview as people are a little suspicious of any­
thing you write unless you tell them what you are writing.
On the next page will be given some suggestions to fol
low in a home visit.
141!
THE TECHNIQUE OE AN INTERVIEW
1. Make an appointment by letter or phone in all but emer­
gency cases. Going unannounced often embarrasses the
parent and pupil. Letters for appointment are to be had
in the office.
2. Have the case well in hand before the interview.
3. Explain your interest in improving the health or social
adjustments of the pupil, depending on the particular
need.
4#
Explain how the school may be improved through acquaint­
ance with the parent.
5. Tell what the school is trying to do for the boys and
girls.
6^
Try to determine how the parent feels toward the school.
Is she satisfied with it?
7.
How does the pupil feel toward the school.
or dislike it?
8.
Invite the parent to come to the school. If the problem
is a serious one, make an appointment for the parent to
visit for conference.
Does he like
142
____________________________________________________________ 1 9
LAST
NAME
FIR ST
GRADE
NAME
HR.
AGE
R ESID EN C E
B U SIN E SS
COURSE
ROOM
OF
BIR TH
MO.
DAY
YEAR
HR
A D V ISER
TELEPHONE
PA R E N T OR G U A RD IA N
PER.
DATE
SCHOOL
PARENT
LAST ATTENDED
GRADE
SU BJEC T
DAYS
ADDRESS O F
TEACHER
I
!
No n e e d
fo r
1
in e
s
«
2
3
*
4
t
i
5
.
6
t
7
i
i
i
8
•
t
9
\
PROGRAM CARD
Los A ngeles C
it y
S chools
FORM
34-H -53-300M
7-39
H '106— 4500— 3-39
REGISTRATION RECORD
143
School
INSTRUCTIONS
nter names of all pupils who did not attend this school last semester. Pupils who are new to the school should be given
utive file numbers. Pupils who have previously attended this school should be given their old file numbers.
Date
Entered
'fo.
PU PIL’S N A M E
sh o u ld
ft
n n liim n
School
Last Attended
E,
ETR,
ETRS,
in which to write the Home Room.-.
Has Pupil
Previously Attended
This School?
F O R M S 1 .S
SM
8 -4 1
L O S A N G E L E S CITY HIGH S C H O O L D IST R IC T
To be made in duplicate.
ORIGINAL to be sent to the Statistical Office of the Budget Division.
DUPLICATE to be retained by Principal.
(Consult “Calendar of Reports Bulletin” for dates reports are to be
submitted.)
A LPH A B ET IC A L
BUDGET DIVISION
JU N IO R AND SE N IO R HIGH SC H O O L STATISTICAL REPORT
SCHOOL
MONTH
D ISTRICT
NO.
EN D ING -
19.
121LL
lO
Legal
Holidays
Holidays
Declared ! Number
and Days by School I of Days
i. Taught
at Institute] Authorities ,1
TO TA L D A Y S'
7
TO TA L DA Y S'
ABSENCE
TOTA L D AY S’
ATTENDANCE
AVERAGE
ETR S P U P IL S
ATTENDANCE
TOTAL
E AND ETR S P U P IL S
N U M B E R O N R E G IS T E R
E X C L U D I N G D U P L IC A T E S
G IR L S
th
STH
SPEC.
Vertical lines should conform to the single
+J
I I
e the typewriter.
*
space of
TOTAL— 7
th
to
S
pe c
.,
In
c l u s iv e
9
th
IO
th
l 1t h
12
th
[ SPEC,
if I n c . p . g .
--------- 4}-■
TOTAL— 9
to
S
pe c
.,
In
c l u s iv e
I Compulsory
Continuation r
j
4—
TOTAL
9TH
TO O TH ER
In c l u s iv e
SPEC.
O th e r
S p ec. D ay
1
DAY,
_____
GRAND TOTAL FO R SC H O O L
13.
"E T R ”
AND “ R”
P U P I L S R E C E IV E D F R O M
O T H E R S C H O O L S T H IS M O N T H .
14.
LTR”
P U P IL S
TRA N SFERRED TO OTH ER
SCHOOLS
T H IS
M ONTH.
P E R C E N T O F A TTEN D A N C E T H IS
LO W PERCEN TA G E
_%
M ONTH.
(9 0 %
OR L E S S)
(
(A )
W AS DUE T O :/ (B )
, (D )
•L ”
P U P IL S
W HO LEFT
T H IS
E P ID E M I C
(S T A T E
BAD W E A T H E R .
OTHER
T Y P E ).
(C )
T R A N S IE N T P O P U L A T IO N -
REASONS-
M ONTH -
( S E E IN S T R U C T I O N S O N R E V E R S E S ID E O F B L A N K )
I CER TIFY THAT T H E ABOVE F IG U R E S ARE A T R U E AND C O RRECT
C O M PILA TIO N O F IN DIV ID UA L P U P IL A TTEN D A N C E R EC O R D S.
SIG NED:.
P R IN C I P A L
SCHOOL
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