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Development aid information management
and its impact on aid volume
Simon Scott, OECD
International Conference on MDG Statistics,
Manila, October 2011
How can aid volume targets be achieved?
Pledges must be realistic:
Measurement must be:
• Clearly defined
• Continuous
• Achievable
• Politically visible
• Have political buy-in
• Undisputed
• Be for short-medium term
• Apply to all pledgers
• Apply at national level, i.e.
not be just a global target
• Of an aggregate
• “Unfudgeable”
Good pledging
0.7% UN aid target,
1970:
• “Each economically advanced
country will progressively
increase its official development
assistance to the developing
countries and will exert its best
efforts to reach a minimum net
amount of 0.7 per cent of its
gross national product at
market prices by the middle of
the decade.”
Gleneagles G8 targets,
2005 (extracts):
• France has announced a timetable to
reach 0.5 per cent ODA/GNI in 2007
• The UK has announced a timetable to
reach 0.7 per cent ODA/GNI by 2013
• The US proposes to double aid to SubSaharan Africa between 2004 and 2010
• Japan intends to increase its ODA volume
by $10 billion in aggregate over the next five
years
• Canada will double its international
assistance from 2001 to 2010
Pledges that are more difficult to monitor
Copenhagen Accord,
2009:
• The collective commitment by
developed countries is to provide new
and additional resources, including
forestry and investments through
international institutions, approaching
USD 30 billion for the period 20102012
Global Strategy for Women’s and
Children’s Health, 2010:
• Australia will invest around US$1.5
billion (A$1.6 billion) over the five
years to 2015 on interventions
evidence shows will improve
maternal and child health outcomes
• The UK’s new Business Plan for
Reproductive Maternal and Newborn
Health will set out how the UK aims
to increase efforts up to 2015 to
double the number of maternal,
newborn and children's lives saved
Official development assistance
over 50 years
140
120
Constant 2009 USD billion
100
1970: UN ODA/GNI
target agreed
80
1996: Shaping the 21st Century Strategy
2000: Millennium Development Goals
2002: Monterrey Conference on Financing
for Development
60
40
20
0
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
Note: Total ODA excludes exceptional debt relief to Iraq and Nigeria in 2005-06.
2010
How much of their projected aid increases for 2010 will donors achieve?
160
Per cent of target met
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
Countries that met the ODA/GNI target of 0.7% (0.7%=100%)
Countries that met or exceeded the minimum targets they set for 2010 (0.51% ODA/GNI for EU countries)
Countries that did not meet the targets they set for 2010
Progress against the aid target for
Least Developed Countries
Aid to LDCs is much higher than to
other recipients
ODA per capita
60
Constant 2008 USD
50
40
30
20
10
0
1970
1975
1980
1985
LDCs
1990
1995
Other developing countries
2000
2005
2010
How to do better in future
OECD-DAC Recommendation on Good Pledging Practice (2011)
Conscious of the need to ensure that donor aid pledges are credible, achievable, and properly monitored,
DAC members will strive to observe, to the largest extent possible, the following principles in their future
pledging practice in respect of financial undertakings towards developing countries.
1. Clarity. Pledges should specify all parameters relevant to assessing their achievement. These include,
but are not limited to, the date or period covered, the source and terms of finance, and the baseline
against which to assess any claims of additionality to existing flows or existing commitments.
2. Comparability. Global pledges by the donor community should be an actual sum of individual donor
pledges, and these pledges should as far as possible be compatible in their terms, dates, baselines,
and units of measurement.
3. Realism. Pledges should be made for periods and amounts over which those pledging have an
appropriate degree of control and authority. The pledges should be reasonable and achievable in the
donor’s budgetary and economic circumstances.
4. Measurability. Pledges should be made on the basis of existing measures of aid and other resource
flows wherever possible. If the data necessary for monitoring a pledge are not already available, then
monitoring responsibilities should be specifically assigned.
5. Accountability and transparency. Pledges should respond in a timely and efficient fashion to priority
needs identified by aid beneficiaries, and donors should provide information sufficient to allow
beneficiaries and third parties to track performance.
Thank you
For more information
www.oecd.org/dac
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